Give Me Liberty An American History 5Th Edition Volume 1 by Eric Foner -Test Bank A+

$35.00
Give Me Liberty An American History 5Th Edition Volume 1 by Eric Foner -Test Bank A+

Give Me Liberty An American History 5Th Edition Volume 1 by Eric Foner -Test Bank A+

$35.00
Give Me Liberty An American History 5Th Edition Volume 1 by Eric Foner -Test Bank A+

What was the impact of King Philip’s War (1675–1676)?

a. New England’s tribes united against the colonists.

b. In the long run, the war produced a broadening of freedom for whites in New England.

c. Native Americans up and down the eastern seaboard began rebelling against colonial rule when they saw what happened to their New England counterparts.

d. Massachusetts banned all Native Americans from living within its borders.

e. Great Britain formed the New England Confederation to protect against Native American depredations.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 73

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Ethnicity | Introduction MSC: Understanding

Both King Philip’s War and Bacon’s Rebellion were conflicts that:

a. Native Americans ultimately won.

b. led to indentured servants gaining more rights.

c. slaves started in hopes of gaining their freedom.

d. started with disputes over Native American territory.

e. involved the spread of Christianity.

ANS: D DIF: Moderate REF: p. 73 | pp. 83–84

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Ethnicity | Introduction | Bacon’s Rebellion: Land and Labor in Virginia

MSC: Evaluating

According to the economic theory known as mercantilism:

a. merchants should control the government because they contributed more than others to national wealth.

b. the government should regulate economic activity so as to promote national power.

c. the government should encourage manufacturing and commerce by keeping its hands off of the economy.

d. colonies existed as a place for the mother country to send raw materials to be turned into manufactured goods.

e. England wanted the right to sell goods in France, but only to non-Catholic buyers.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 74

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Economic Development | The Mercantilist System

MSC: Understanding

In 1651 the first English Navigation Act:

a. required the Royal Navy to use only Protestant navigators on its ships.

b. aimed to wrest control of world trade from the Dutch.

c. freed England’s North American colonies from economic regulations (to stimulate prosperity).

d. added New Netherland to the British empire.

e. authorized several mapmaking expeditions to the New World.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 74

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Economic Development | The Mercantilist System MSC: Understanding

“Enumerated” goods:

a. made up the bulk of items imported into the colonies from abroad.

b. were those the English colonies could not produce under the terms of the Navigation Acts.

c. created a financial drain on the English government during the seventeenth century.

d. were colonial products, such as tobacco and sugar, that first had to be imported to England.

e. were specifically exempt from England’s mercantilist regulations.

ANS: D DIF: Difficult REF: p. 74

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Economic Development | The Mercantilist System MSC: Remembering

What sparked a new period of colonial expansion for England in the mid-seventeenth century?

a. England’s defeat of the Netherlands in the Fourth Anglo-Dutch War of 1649.

b. England’s victory in a 1676 religious war with Spain.

c. A treaty signed with the Iroquois Confederacy.

d. The incredible financial success of the British East India Company.

e. The restoration of the monarchy in 1660.

ANS: E DIF: Difficult REF: p. 74

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Political History | The Conquest of New Netherland MSC: Remembering

How did the Dutch lose New Netherland to England?

a. It resulted from a treaty in Europe.

b. The Duke of York married into the Dutch royal family.

c. The Dutch traded the colony back to Indians, who sold it to the English.

d. The English seized it during the Anglo-Dutch War.

e. Puritans from New England mounted an invasion with the idea of setting up a holy community.

ANS: D DIF: Difficult REF: p. 76

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Political History | The Conquest of New Netherland MSC: Remembering

A goal for the English in gaining New Amsterdam and New Netherland from the Dutch was to:

a. gain slaves. d. gain more farmland.

b. control more territory. e. spread the Protestant faith.

c. control trade.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 74 | p. 76

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Political History | Changes | Economic Development | The Conquest of New Netherland

MSC: Analyzing

When England gained control of New York from the Dutch, what happened to African-Americans?

a. They banned the institution of slavery in their new colony.

b. They introduced the practice of slavery in New York.

c. The free black population gained more job opportunities.

d. The English moved the free black population to nearby New Jersey.

e. Free blacks lost employment opportunities in skilled jobs.

ANS: E DIF: Moderate REF: p. 76

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Political History | Social History | New York and the Rights of Englishmen and Englishwomen

MSC: Understanding

How did English rule affect the Iroquois Confederacy?

a. They created an alliance in order to aid each other’s imperial ambitions.

b. The English destroyed the Iroquois Confederacy temporarily but revived it under Sir Edmund Andros’s rule after the Glorious Revolution of 1688.

c. English oppression drove the Iroquois to the side of the French, who eagerly sought their support.

d. It enabled the Iroquois to build alliances with other tribes against a common enemy.

e. The Iroquois adopted the English constitutional system.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 76

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Ethnicity | New York and the Indians MSC: Understanding

What was the Covenant Chain?

a. The promise James II gave Parliament that he would marry a Protestant princess.

b. An agreement between the Dutch and the Mohican Nation that led to the founding of New Netherland.

c. A mythical piece of priceless gold jewelry that Europeans wished to acquire from the Iroquois.

d. An important Puritan text that spelled out the doctrine of predestination.

e. An alliance made by the governor of New York and the Iroquois Confederacy.

ANS: E DIF: Moderate REF: p. 76

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Ethnicity | New York and the Indians MSC: Remembering

By the end of the seventeenth century, who was most successful at using diplomacy in securing rights to use land?

a. Hurons. d. Creeks.

b. Iroquois. e. Powhatan.

c. Wampanoags.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 77

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Ethnicity | Political History | New York and the Indians MSC: Analyzing

The Charter of Liberties and Privileges in New York:

a. was the work of the Dutch, who did not trust the English to protect their religious freedom.

b. resulted especially from displeasure among residents of Manhattan.

c. required that elections be held every three years.

d. affirmed religious toleration for all denominations.

e. eliminated the property requirement for voting.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 77

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Political History | The Charter of Liberties MSC: Understanding

In its early years, Carolina was the “colony of a colony” because its original settlers included many:

a. former indentured servants from Virginia.

b. supporters of Anne Hutchinson seeking refuge from Massachusetts.

c. landless sons of wealthy planters in Barbados.

d. Protestants upset over Catholic rule in Maryland.

e. planters from Cuba hoping to expand their sugarcane empires.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 78

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Social History | The Founding of Carolina MSC: Remembering

The Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina:

a. were modeled after the Cherokee government.

b. permitted only members of the Church of England to worship freely.

c. resulted in absolute power over slaves and indentured servants.

d. did not allow a headright society.

e. wanted only a feudal society and no assembly.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 92

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Constitutional History | The Founding of Carolina MSC: Understanding

What inspired the 1715 uprising by the Yamasee and Creek peoples against English colonists in Carolina?

a. The colonists’ refusal to trade with the Yamasee and Creek.

b. An alliance of the Yamasee and Creek with the Iroquois Confederacy, which had declared war against New York colonists.

c. High debts incurred by the Yamasee and Creek in trade with the English settlers.

d. The English colonists’ plans to begin capturing Native Americans to sell as slaves.

e. A bloody rebellion by African slaves against their masters near Charles Town.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 92

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Ethnicity | The Founding of Carolina MSC: Understanding

Of colonists in British North America, which group was the wealthiest?

a. Philadelphia merchants. d. South Carolina rice planters.

b. Boston political elite. e. New York merchants.

c. Virginia tobacco farmers.

ANS: D DIF: Moderate REF: p. 78

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Economic Development | The Founding of Carolina MSC: Remembering

In Carolina, conflict with Indians occurred, but similar problems did NOT take place in Pennsylvania because:

a. few Indians lived in Pennsylvania.

b. the English wiped out all of the Indians within the first five years of the start of the colony.

c. from the beginning, William Penn ordered the seizure of all Indian land.

d. William Penn did not allow the enslavement of Indians.

e. William Penn preferred enslaving Africans.

ANS: D DIF: Moderate REF: p. 79

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Social History | The Holy Experiment MSC: Understanding

If Massachusetts Bay’s Jonathan Winthrop had been present at the start of the Pennsylvania colony, he would have:

a. praised William Penn’s Native American policy.

b. condemned the idea of whole families migrating to Pennsylvania.

c. praised the diversity of the immigrants.

d. condemned land being used for farming.

e. praised the idea of religion serving as a model for the colony.

ANS: E DIF: Difficult REF: p. 79

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Social History | The Holy Experiment MSC: Applying

To Quakers, liberty was:

a. limited to white, landowning men.

b. strictly defined.

c. a universal entitlement.

d. extended to women but not to blacks.

e. limited to the spiritually inclined.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 79

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Political History | The Holy Experiment MSC: Remembering

Pennsylvania’s treatment of Native Americans was unique in what way?

a. Pennsylvania was the only colony in which efforts at conversion focused on turning Native Americans into Quakers.

b. The colony bought all of the land the Native Americans occupied and moved them west of the Appalachians, meaning that Indians were relocated but not decimated.

c. Because Quakers were pacifists, they had to bring in militias from other colonies to take over Native American lands.

d. Despite Quaker pacifism, Pennsylvanians were determined to exterminate the natives.

e. Pennsylvania purchased Indian land that was then resold to colonists and offered refuge to tribes driven out of other colonies.

ANS: E DIF: Moderate REF: p. 79

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Social History | Ethnicity | The Holy Experiment MSC: Understanding

What was one of Pennsylvania’s only restrictions on religious liberty?

a. Settlers could belong to any denomination but had to sign an oath affirming that they would not oppress Quakers.

b. Holding office required an oath affirming a belief in Jesus Christ, which eliminated Jews from serving.

c. Atheists were welcome as long as they promised not to publicly attack religion.

d. Church attendance was mandatory, but the state did not specify which type of church.

e. There were no restrictions.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 79

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Social History | The Holy Experiment MSC: Understanding

What ironic consequence did William Penn’s generous policies, such as religious toleration and inexpensive land, have?

a. They contributed to the increasing reliance of Virginia and Maryland on African slave labor.

b. Now that Pennsylvania attracted so many settlers, Carolina was desperate for laborers and began a vast Indian slave trade.

c. They actually discouraged suspicious Europeans from choosing Pennsylvania as a place to settle.

d. They led the Puritan authorities in Massachusetts to adopt religious toleration in order to compete with Pennsylvania for colonists.

e. They encouraged poor residents of New York and New Jersey to move to Pennsylvania in such numbers that Penn repealed his policies within a decade.

ANS: A DIF: Difficult REF: p. 80

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Social History | Land in Pennsylvania MSC: Understanding

Who in the Pennsylvania colony was eligible to vote?

a. Everyone, male and female. d. Quakers.

b. A majority of the male population. e. All people of European descent.

c. All males.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: pp. 79–78

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Political History | Land in Pennsylvania MSC: Remembering

What was key to making the enslavement of Africans an enduring economic and social institution in colonial America?

a. Slavery became perpetual, as the children of slaves were slaves too.

b. Africans were less likely to run away than Native Americans.

c. Racism had existed since ancient times in England.

d. Africans fell under the purview of English common law.

e. The word “slave” came from several different West African languages.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 80

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Civil Rights | Origins of American Slavery MSC: Analyzing

In seventeenth-century England, the main lines of division focused on:

a. race. d. religion.

b. ethnicity. e. literature.

c. political ideals.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 80

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Social History | Englishmen and Africans MSC: Understanding

Which of the following is true of slavery?

a. The English word “slavery” derives from “Slav,” reflecting the slave trade in Slavic peoples until the fifteenth century.

b. Christians never were enslaved.

c. The Roman Empire outlawed it, but it revived, thanks to Columbus.

d. It was nonexistent in Africa until the arrival of European slave traders.

e. In every culture in which it existed, it was based on the needs of large-scale agriculture.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 81

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Social History | Slavery in History MSC: Understanding

Unlike slavery in America, slavery in Africa:

a. declined in importance during the 1600s.

b. was more likely to be based in the household than on an agricultural plantation.

c. led to much higher death rates.

d. was entirely race-based.

e. existed only for women.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 81

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Social History | Slavery in History MSC: Understanding

Which commodity drove the African slave trade in Brazil and the West Indies during the seventeenth century?

a. Tobacco. d. Cotton.

b. Indigo. e. Sugar.

c. Silver.

ANS: E DIF: Easy REF: p. 81

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Global Awareness | Slavery in the West Indies MSC: Remembering

A West African captured and sold into slavery in 1650 most likely ended up in:

a. Massachusetts. d. the Carolinas.

b. the West Indies. e. Virginia.

c. Mexico.

ANS: B DIF: Easy REF: pp. 81–82

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Global Awareness | Slavery in the West Indies MSC: Applying

Which of the following is true of the English West Indies in the seventeenth century?

a. By the end of the century, the African population far outnumbered the European population on most islands.

b. Mixed economies with small farms worked by indentured servants dominated islands such as Barbados throughout the century.

c. Frequent uprisings by African slaves caused the English to abandon the West Indies by the 1680s and to relocate staple crop production to mainland North America.

d. The free labor system of the West Indies stood in stark contrast to the slave labor system of the Chesapeake.

e. Indentured servants replaced African slaves in the West Indies once the demand for slaves in Carolina drained away the African population of the islands.

ANS: A DIF: Easy REF: p. 82

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Global Awareness | Slavery in the West Indies MSC: Understanding

Slavery developed more slowly in North America than in the English West Indies because:

a. it was a longer trip from Africa to North America, making slavery less profitable.

b. planters in Virginia and Maryland agreed that indentured servants were far less troublesome.

c. the high death rate among tobacco workers made it economically unappealing to pay more for a slave likely to die within a short time.

d. Parliament passed a law in 1643 that gave tax breaks to British West Indian planters who imported slaves but not to American colonists who imported slaves.

e. those living in the British West Indies opposed slavery until the American colonies won their independence in the Revolutionary War.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 82

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Social History | Slavery in the West Indies MSC: Analyzing

According to laws in the seventeenth-century Chesapeake:

a. black men were not permitted to marry white women but black women could marry white men.

b. free blacks had the right to sue and testify in court.

c. free blacks were not permitted to serve in the militia unless they signed a loyalty oath.

d. the sale of any married slave was prohibited.

e. the children of enslaved women were free; the status of enslavement was not inherited.

ANS: B DIF: Difficult REF: p. 83

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Civil Rights | Slavery and the Law MSC: Understanding

When the Virginia House of Burgesses decreed that religious conversion did not release a slave from bondage:

a. every other colonial assembly followed suit.

b. Governor William Berkeley vetoed the measure, which led to Bacon’s Rebellion.

c. it meant that, under Virginia law, Christians could own other Christians.

d. mass protests followed.

e. slaves quit attending church.

ANS: C DIF: Easy REF: p. 83

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Civil Rights | The Rise of Chesapeake Slavery MSC: Understanding

Which of the following was true of small farmers in 1670s Virginia?

a. The economy was doing so well that even though they made less money than large-scale planters, their problems were too small to justify their rebellion.

b. They had access to the best land, but a glut in the tobacco market left them in poverty.

c. Their taxes were incredibly low—the one issue with which they were pleased.

d. They could count on the government to help them take over Native American lands and thereby expand their meager holdings.

e. They lacked access to good land for farming.

ANS: E DIF: Moderate REF: p. 84

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Social History | Bacon’s Rebellion: Land and Labor in Virginia

MSC: Understanding

Bacon’s Rebellion was a response to:

a. worsening economic conditions in Virginia.

b. increased slavery in the Carolinas.

c. Indian attacks in New England.

d. the Glorious Revolution in England.

e. the Salem witch trials.

ANS: A DIF: Easy REF: p. 84

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Social History | Bacon’s Rebellion: Land and Labor in Virginia

MSC: Remembering

Nathaniel Bacon:

a. actually was socially closer to the elite than to the indentured servants who supported him.

b. had no connection to Virginia’s wealthiest planters.

c. won unanimous support for his effort to reduce taxes, but his effort to remove all Native Americans from the colony doomed his rebellion.

d. burned down Jamestown but never succeeded in taking over the colony or driving out Governor Berkeley.

e. was the first colonist to open his own slaughterhouse.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 84

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Social History | Bacon’s Rebellion: Land and Labor in Virginia

MSC: Understanding

What happened to Jamestown during Bacon’s Rebellion?

a. The town was impenetrable and well fortified.

b. The town accepted the surrender of Bacon.

c. The small landowners sided with the Jamestown elite.

d. It was invaded by the Powhatans.

e. It was burned to the ground.

ANS: E DIF: Easy REF: p. 84

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Social History | Bacon’s Rebellion: Land and Labor in Virginia

MSC: Remembering

Bacon’s Rebellion contributed to which of the following in Virginia?

a. A large and sustained increase in the importation of indentured servants.

b. Generous payments to Native Americans to encourage them to give up their lands to white farmers.

c. Changes in the political style of Virginia’s powerful large-scale planters, who adopted a get-tough policy with small farmers and hired their own militia to enforce their will.

d. The replacing of indentured servants with African slaves on Virginia’s plantations.

e. An order from Governor Berkeley that Native Americans could serve in the militia.

ANS: D DIF: Moderate REF: p. 86

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Social History | Bacon’s Rebellion: Land and Labor in Virginia

MSC: Understanding

Slave labor in the Chesapeake region increasingly supplanted indentured servitude during the last two decades of the seventeenth century, in part because:

a. the opening of the new colony of North Carolina attracted enough whites to make up for the loss of those who would have come to the New World as indentured servants.

b. Bacon’s Rebellion reminded leaders of the dangers of allowing racial intermarriage.

c. the price of imported slaves from Africa had become less expensive.

d. a monopoly on the slave trade made it easier to import Africans.

e. indentured servants began forming associations that went on strike for better conditions.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 85

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Economic Development | A Slave Society MSC: Understanding

The Virginia slave code of 1705:

a. simply brought together old aspects of the laws governing slaves and slavery.

b. completely rewrote and changed the earlier slave laws.

c. embedded the principle of white supremacy in law.

d. made clear that slaves were subject to the will of their masters but not to anyone who could not claim ownership of them.

e. was the work of Nathaniel Bacon.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 85

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Civil Rights | A Slave Society MSC: Understanding

Which of the following is true of slave resistance in the colonial period?

a. Runaways were very rare because slaves knew that attempting to escape would be futile.

b. Running away was common as colonial newspapers ran ads from slave owners looking to recover their property.

c. A number of bloody rebellions prompted a wholesale revision of slave codes.

d. It was limited because slaves at the time were too new to the colonies to understand the concept of freedom.

e. All runaways headed for freedom in French Canada.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 85

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Civil Rights | A Slave Society MSC: Understanding

The Glorious Revolution of 1688:

a. resulted mainly from the fears of English aristocrats that the birth of James II’s son would lead to a Catholic succession.

b. ended parliamentary rule in Great Britain until Queen Anne’s War in 1702.

c. was the work of an ambitious Danish prince out to avenge his father’s murder by a British nobleman.

d. had no impact on the British colonies in America.

e. prompted Scotland’s secession from Great Britain and thus a reduction in Scotch-Irish immigration to the colonies.

ANS: A DIF: Easy REF: p. 87

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Political History | The Glorious Revolution

MSC: Understanding

The English Bill of Rights of 1689:

a. was unwritten, like the English constitution on which it was based.

b. was King William’s finest writing on the importance of liberty.

c. divided power in England between the king and Parliament.

d. was copied word for word into the U.S. Constitution a century later.

e. listed such individual rights as trial by jury.

ANS: E DIF: Moderate REF: p. 87

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Political History | The Glorious Revolution

MSC: Remembering

In what ways did England reduce colonial autonomy during the 1680s?

a. Charles II revoked the charters of all colonies that had violated the Navigation Acts.

b. It created the Dominion of New England, run by a royal appointee without benefit of an elected assembly.

c. Because Charles II and James II were at least closet Catholics, the colonies no longer could establish churches within their borders.

d. The king started appointing all judges.

e. Not at all; this was the era in which colonies achieved autonomy.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 88

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Political History | The Glorious Revolution in America

MSC: Understanding

Why did Massachusetts have its charter revoked by Charles II?

a. The Salem witch trials made a mockery of colonial law.

b. Massachusetts’s opposition to the Glorious Revolution angered Parliament.

c. The king planned on living in Massachusetts after fleeing England.

d. Charles did not like Massachusetts’s violations of Navigation laws.

e. Charles wanted to give more colonial power to Plymouth.

ANS: D DIF: Difficult REF: p. 103

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Political History | Changes | The Glorious Revolution in America

MSC: Understanding

Which colony had its charter revoked because of mismanagement, according to King William?

a. New Hampshire. d. New York.

b. Pennsylvania. e. Maryland.

c. Virginia.

ANS: E DIF: Moderate REF: p. 88

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Social History | The Glorious Revolution in America

MSC: Remembering

Captain Jacob Leisler, the head of the rebel militia that took control of New York in 1689:

a. was a close ally of Sir Edmund Andros, who was trying to regain control of the Dominion of New England.

b. was overthrown and killed in so grisly a manner that the rivalry between his friends and foes polarized New York politics for years.

c. was knighted for his role in supporting the Glorious Revolution.

d. sought to impose Catholic rule but was defeated by a Protestant militia in a short but bloody civil war.

e. slaughtered so many Native Americans that wars between whites and the remaining tribes kept New York in an uproar for the next two decades.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 88

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Social History | The Glorious Revolution in America

MSC: Remembering

What resulted from the disbanding of the Dominion of New England?

a. New York and New Jersey were unified.

b. West Jersey and East Jersey were created.

c. Land was returned to the Iroquois.

d. Massachusetts absorbed Plymouth.

e. Carolina was divided into two colonies.

ANS: D DIF: Difficult REF: pp. 88–89

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: The Glorious Revolution in America

MSC: Understanding

Once Massachusetts became a royal colony in 1691:

a. it was required to abide by the English Act of Toleration, which displeased many Puritan leaders.

b. it received the right to have its voters elect its own governor and legislative assembly.

c. Plymouth was split off from Massachusetts to become its own independent colony.

d. church membership became the chief legal requirement for voting.

e. social tensions generally decreased and a relatively peaceful period ensued.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 89

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Political History | The Glorious Revolution in America

MSC: Understanding

According to New England Puritans, witchcraft:

a. was perfectly acceptable when it was used for proper purposes.

b. was punishable by hanging unless it was used to reinforce men’s standing and God’s will.

c. resulted from pacts that women made with the devil to obtain supernatural powers or interfere with natural processes.

d. was restricted to Salem.

e. was due entirely to exposure to Catholicism.

ANS: C DIF: Easy REF: p. 89

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Social History | The Salem Witch Trials

MSC: Remembering

Which of the following fits the description of a person most likely to have been accused of witchcraft in seventeenth-century New England?

a. a single young woman whose attractiveness meant that some saw her as a threat to Puritan values.

b. a married woman who normally was subservient to her husband and the community, which made her behavior seem all the more bizarre.

c. a widow who presumably was too lonely or too dependent on the community to be taken seriously, but who had to be tried and convicted to keep others from thinking similarly.

d. a married woman who had just lost a child.

e. a woman beyond childbearing age who was outspoken, economically independent, or estranged from her husband.

ANS: E DIF: Moderate REF: p. 89

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Social History | The Salem Witch Trials

MSC: Evaluating

Why did the accusations of witchcraft in Salem suddenly snowball in 1692?

a. The only way to avoid prosecution was to confess and name others.

b. When Tituba testified, the issue became racial and divided the town.

c. All of the accused were children, and Puritans were determined to force their young to accept their religious traditions or face death.

d. The colonial capital had just been moved to Salem, upsetting the normally staid town.

e. They did not; actually, the number of accusations was average and Salem was highly overrated as a place for charges of witchcraft.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 90

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Social History | The Salem Witch Trials

MSC: Understanding

Who finally ended the Salem witch trials?

a. The Massachusetts governor. d. Tituba.

b. The local pastor. e. Increase Mather.

c. Salem’s judge.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 90

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Social History | The Salem Witch Trials

MSC: Remembering

Which of the following best sums up population diversity in colonial English America?

a. From the beginning of English settlement, the colonies were highly diverse in race and religion.

b. England originally promoted emigration to the colonies as a means of ridding itself of excess population but cut back in the eighteenth century.

c. Men and women arrived in almost equal numbers because English officials encouraged women to leave, believing that fewer women in the mother country would equal slower population growth.

d. England urged professionals and skilled craftspeople to go to its colonies in America because it wanted to create a model society there, but eventually it began to urge vagabonds and “masterless men” to go instead.

e. Germans were the only non-British group allowed to live in the colonies.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 91

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Ethnicity | A Diverse Population MSC: Understanding

England sought to attract which of the following to its American colonies in the eighteenth century?

a. Protestants from non-English and less prosperous parts of the British Isles.

b. Catholics from France and Spain, thereby weakening England’s enemies.

c. Professionals and skilled craftsmen from England.

d. Members of nonmainstream religions, particularly Quakers and Anabaptists.

e. Wealthy merchants who could spur economic growth in the colonies.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 91

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Ethnicity | A Diverse Population MSC: Understanding

The immigrant group that was primarily Presbyterian was:

a. Irish. d. English.

b. Scotch-Irish. e. German.

c. Swedish.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 91

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Geographic Issues | A Diverse Population MSC: Remembering

The German migration to the English colonies:

a. was small when compared to other European migrants.

b. involved fur trapping west of the Appalachian Mountains.

c. was to frontier areas as farmers.

d. was mainly to New England as they came to frontier areas.

e. was as slaveholders in the coastal Carolina region.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 95

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Ethnicity | The German Migration MSC: Understanding

English and Dutch merchants created a well-organized system for “redemptioners.” What was this system for?

a. For New Englanders to trade molasses for rum with the West Indies.

b. For bringing Protestant refugees to North America for a hefty fee.

c. For carrying indentured German families to America, where they would work off their transportation debt.

d. For unloading the unwanted convicts of London and Amsterdam to ports such as Boston and New York.

e. For pirating against Spain and France, their Catholic archenemies.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 95

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Ethnicity | The German Migration MSC: Remembering

The separation of church and state:

a. existed only in Virginia and North Carolina.

b. was due largely to the increasing Jewish presence in the colonies.

c. was in the majority of colonies because of the proliferation of many different Protestant groups.

d. expanded in the colonies because of the English Civil War.

e. was not the norm, as most colonies had taxes to pay the salary of clergy.

ANS: E DIF: Moderate REF: p. 95

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Political History | Religious Diversity MSC: Understanding

Indians in eighteenth-century British America:

a. were well integrated into the British imperial system.

b. benefited from the Walking Purchase of 1737.

c. were viewed in the same way by traders, British officials, and farmers.

d. never warred with the colonists.

e. had access to the liberties guaranteed to Englishmen.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 95

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Ethnicity | Indian Life in Transition MSC: Understanding

The Walking Purchase of 1737:

a. led to war with the Iroquois and a divided confederacy.

b. was a deceitful land deal for the Cherokees.

c. was drawn up from William Penn’s agreement with the English monarchy.

d. sparked a slave revolt.

e. involved swift runners being used to map out land being taken away from Indians.

ANS: E DIF: Moderate REF: p. 96

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Ethnicity | Indian Life in Transition MSC: Understanding

The colonists that proved most harmful to Native Americans were:

a. merchants. d. fur trappers.

b. slave traders. e. silversmiths.

c. farmers.

ANS: C DIF: Difficult REF: p. 96

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Economic Development | Indian Life in Transition MSC: Applying

The letter from the Swiss-German immigrant would have

a. served to deter other immigrants coming to America.

b. attracted immigrants facing starvation.

c. led to more Germans coming for religious freedom.

d. attracted slaveowners.

e. served as a cautionary tale about colonial taxes.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 93

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Social History | Voices of Freedom MSC: Applying

In “Voices of Freedom,” the writer of “Memorial against Non-English Immigration” might find some common ground with the Swiss-German who wrote a letter home to his family in 1769. What could they have in common?

a. They both advocated that all people in America should carry weapons.

b. If the Swiss-German was Protestant, he might share a fear of Catholicism with the other writer.

c. They both believed squatting on land was acceptable.

d. The writer of “Memorial” would actually want the Swiss-German to be reunited with his family in the American colonies.

e. The Swiss-German actually wanted to limit the number of immigrants to the colonies, too.

ANS: B DIF: Difficult REF: p. 92

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Social History | Voices of Freedom MSC: Applying

By the eighteenth century, consumer goods such as books and ceramic plates:

a. were found in many colonial residents’ homes.

b. were specifically banned in the colonies by the Navigation Acts.

c. were rare in the colonies, thus demonstrating that the colonists lived in a premodern world.

d. were manufactured in several mainland English colonies but had to be shipped to England for sale.

e. were almost entirely Dutch-made.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 97

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Social History | The Consumer Revolution MSC: Remembering

During the colonial era, Philadelphia:

a. became home to a varied population of artisans and craftsmen.

b. was one of the empire’s least successful seaports.

c. was large by European standards.

d. was populated almost entirely by wealthy citizens.

e. came under the almost dictatorial control of Benjamin Franklin.

ANS: A DIF: Easy REF: p. 98

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Social History | Colonial Cities MSC: Remembering

Which of the following was true of the colonial elite?

a. Like the mother country, the colonies had a titled aristocracy.

b. They controlled colonial government.

c. They often encountered financial trouble because they lacked connections to their counterparts back in the mother country.

d. Most of them were as wealthy as, if not wealthier than, the British aristocracy.

e. All of them were careful to marry outside their families.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 99

OBJ: 5. Explain how the patterns of class and gender roles changed in eighteenth-century America.

TOP: Social History | The Colonial Elite MSC: Understanding

Which of the following was true of poverty in the colonial period?

a. Poverty was greater in the colonies than it was in Great Britain, which had more economic activity.

b. The percentage of colonists living in poverty was great because the northern colonists considered slaves poverty-stricken.

c. Limited supplies of land contributed to poverty.

d. Colonists differed greatly from the British back in England in how they viewed poverty and those living in poverty.

e. It declined in the cities because of the rise of consumer markets.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 100

OBJ: 5. Explain how the patterns of class and gender roles changed in eighteenth-century America.

TOP: Social History | Poverty in the Colonies MSC: Understanding

Over the course of the eighteenth century in colonial America, the:

a. percentage of landowners increased in urban areas.

b. economic rights of slaves increased.

c. wealthy wanted to spread the wealth to decrease poverty.

d. percentage of landowners became less in the colonies than it was in England.

e. rich became richer.

ANS: E DIF: Difficult REF: pp. 100–101

OBJ: 5. Explain how the patterns of class and gender roles changed in eighteenth-century America.

TOP: Economic Development | Poverty in the Colonies MSC: Analyzing

By the eighteenth century, colonial farm families:

a. almost always owned at least three slaves.

b. were in decline as bigger cities like Philadelphia expanded.

c. saw freedom as depending on their political rights, not their ownership of property.

d. viewed land ownership almost as a right, a precondition of freedom.

e. engaged in arranged intermarriages.

ANS: D DIF: Moderate REF: p. 101

OBJ: 5. Explain how the patterns of class and gender roles changed in eighteenth-century America.

TOP: Social History | The Middle Ranks MSC: Understanding

As English colonial society became more structured in the eighteenth century, what were the effects on women?

a. They received more legal rights, such as the right to own property in their own names.

b. Women’s work became more clearly defined as tied closely to the home.

c. Their workloads decreased thanks to technological advances such as the spinning wheel and to declining infant mortality rates.

d. Women were permitted to practice law.

e. Women bore so few children that population levels slightly declined in the 1740s, then stabilized until the American Revolution.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 102

OBJ: 5. Explain how the patterns of class and gender roles changed in eighteenth-century America.

TOP: Social History | Women and the Household Economy MSC: Understanding

For an eighteenth-century middle-class colonial woman, what would have been the top priority in daily life?

a. Helping her artisan husband make his product.

b. Taking to market corn harvested by her husband.

c. Cooking the family meals.

d. Teaching her children to sing and dance properly.

e. Keeping a family journal.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 102

OBJ: 5. Explain how the patterns of class and gender roles changed in eighteenth-century America.

TOP: Social History | Women and the Household Economy MSC: Applying

MATCHING

TEST 1

Match the person or term with the with the correct description.

a. established a Committee of Safety in New York

b. a Protestant who became King of England

c. Metacom

d. formed Covenant Chain with Iroquois

e. elite planter who called for reform in Virginia

f. governor of Virginia during Bacon’s Rebellion

g. a Catholic who became King of England

h. restoration of monarchy

i. proprietor of Pennsylvania

j. Walking Purchase

k. overthrown in the Glorious Revolution

Nathaniel Bacon

Charles II

William Penn

William of Orange

James Logan

Duke of York

Jacob Leisler

James II

King Philip

William Berkeley

Edmund Andros

ANS: E

ANS: H

ANS: I

ANS: B

ANS: G

ANS: A

ANS: K

ANS: C

ANS: F

ANS: D

ANS: J

TEST 2

Match the person or term with the with the correct description.

a. elites in America becoming more culturally English

b. allowed Protestant Dissenters to worship freely in England

c. government regulation of the nation’s economy (to enssure national power)

d. placed William of Orange on the English throne

e. had a monopoly on the slave trade

f. a very liberal frame for government

g. English demanded this over their former Dutch rulers

h. agreement between New York and Iroquois

i. believed in the equality of all persons

j. law that regulated the shipping and selling of colonial products

k. the poor of Virginia demand change

l. war between New Englanders and Indians

Charter of Liberties

mercantilism

Royal African Company

Anglicization

Bacon’s Rebellion

Toleration Act

King Philip’s War

Navigation Act

West Jersey Concessions

Quakers

Covenant Chain

Glorious Revolution

ANS: G

ANS: C

ANS: E

ANS: A

ANS: K

ANS: B

ANS: L

ANS: J

ANS: F

ANS: I

ANS: H

ANS: D

TRUE/FALSE

New Netherland never became an important or sizable colony in the Dutch empire.

ANS: T DIF: Moderate REF: p. 76

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Global Awareness | The Conquest of New Netherland MSC: Remembering

Rice was Carolina’s major cash crop, leading to a very wealthy elite.

ANS: T DIF: Moderate REF: p. 78

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Ethnicity | The Founding of Carolina MSC: Remembering

William Penn believed in equality and liberty, but not for Indians or blacks.

ANS: F DIF: Easy REF: p. 79

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Political History | The Holy Experiment MSC: Remembering

The freedom William Penn valued the most dealt with the right to worship freely.

ANS: T DIF: Easy REF: p. 79

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Political History | The Holy Experiment MSC: Remembering

Race and racism are modern concepts and had not been fully developed by the seventeenth century.

ANS: T DIF: Moderate REF: p. 80

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Civil Rights | Englishmen and Africans MSC: Understanding

Slavery flourished in Brazil and the West Indies in the seventeenth century because of tobacco.

ANS: F DIF: Moderate REF: p. 81

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Social History | Slavery in the West Indies MSC: Remembering

As in the Spanish empire, British North America developed a distinctive mulatto, or mixed-race, class.

ANS: F DIF: Moderate REF: p. 83

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Geographic Issues | The Rise of Chesapeake Slavery MSC: Remembering

Bacon’s Rebellion was caused by a conflict between blacks and whites in Virginia.

ANS: F DIF: Moderate REF: pp. 83–85

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Social History | Bacon’s Rebellion: Land and Labor in Virginia

MSC: Remembering

A consequence of Bacon’s Rebellion was a consolidation of power among Virginia’s elite.

ANS: T DIF: Moderate REF: p. 85

OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Social History | Bacon’s Rebellion: Land and Labor in Virginia

MSC: Understanding

The Glorious Revolution in England was bloody and violent.

ANS: F DIF: Easy REF: p. 87

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Political History | The Glorious Revolution

MSC: Remembering

Parliament enacted a bill of rights upon the completion of the Glorious Revolution.

ANS: T DIF: Moderate REF: p. 87

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Political History | The Glorious Revolution

MSC: Remembering

Following the Glorious Revolution, the Massachusetts colony had to abide by the Toleration Act.

ANS: T DIF: Moderate REF: p. 89

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Political History | The Glorious Revolution in America

MSC: Remembering

Most of those executed for witchcraft in Salem were women.

ANS: T DIF: Easy REF: p. 90

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century. TOP: Social History | The Salem Witch Trials

MSC: Remembering

In the eighteenth century, efforts began to stop emigration from England, except that convicts were still sent to bolster the Chesapeake labor force.

ANS: T DIF: Moderate REF: p. 91

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Social History | A Diverse Population MSC: Understanding

German immigrants greatly enhanced the ethnic and religious diversity of Britain’s colonies.

ANS: T DIF: Easy REF: p. 91

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Ethnicity | The German Migration MSC: Remembering

The Indians entered into the Walking Purchase in good faith, but they were taken advantage of by the Pennsylvania governor.

ANS: T DIF: Moderate REF: p. 96

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Ethnicity | Indian Life in Transition MSC: Remembering

Many perceived Pennsylvania to be “the best poor man’s country.”

ANS: T DIF: Moderate REF: p. 97

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Social History | Regional Diversity MSC: Understanding

The cities were the most rapidly growing region in North America by the mid-eighteenth century.

ANS: F DIF: Moderate REF: pp. 96–97

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Social History | Regional Diversity | Colonial Cities MSC: Remembering

Most colonists did not complain about the British regulating trade through the Navigation Acts.

ANS: T DIF: Easy REF: p. 98

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Economic Development | An Atlantic World MSC: Understanding

Charleston was the richest city in British North America.

ANS: T DIF: Moderate REF: p. 99

OBJ: 5. Explain how the patterns of class and gender roles changed in eighteenth-century America.

TOP: Economic Development | The Colonial Elite MSC: Remembering

Anglicization meant that the colonial elites rejected all things British.

ANS: F DIF: Easy REF: p. 100

OBJ: 5. Explain how the patterns of class and gender roles changed in eighteenth-century America.

TOP: Ethnicity | Anglicization MSC: Remembering

To minimize the burden on taxpayers, poor persons were frequently set to labor in workhouses, where they produced goods that reimbursed authorities for part of their upkeep.

ANS: T DIF: Moderate REF: p. 101

OBJ: 5. Explain how the patterns of class and gender roles changed in eighteenth-century America.

TOP: Social History | Poverty in the Colonies MSC: Understanding

In an English colony, a person was less likely than someone in Europe to be a landowner and voter.

ANS: F DIF: Moderate REF: p. 102

OBJ: 5. Explain how the patterns of class and gender roles changed in eighteenth-century America.

TOP: Social History | Political History | North America at Mid-Century

MSC: Understanding

SHORT ANSWER

Identify and give the historical significance of each of the following terms, events, and people in a paragraph or two.

Slavery

ANS:

Answers will vary

Indentured servitude

ANS:

Answers will vary

William Berkeley

ANS:

Answers will vary

Duke of York

ANS:

Answers will vary

Poverty in the colonies

ANS:

Answers will vary

German migration

ANS:

Answers will vary

Charter of Liberties and Privileges

ANS:

Answers will vary

The Maryland Uprising

ANS:

Answers will vary

Glorious Revolution in America

ANS:

Answers will vary

Anglicization

ANS:

Answers will vary

Consumer revolution

ANS:

Answers will vary

William Penn

ANS:

Answers will vary

Leisler’s Rebellion

ANS:

Answers will vary

ESSAY

Discuss the major social and political crises that the English colonies of North America experienced in the late seventeenth century. What were the sources of these crises, and how did they affect the inhabitants of the colonies?

ANS:

Answers will vary

DIF: Moderate

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century.

TOP: Political History | Social History | Bacon’s Rebellion: Land and Labor in Virginia | The End of the Rebellion and Its Consequences | The Glorious Revolution in America | The Salem Witch Trials

MSC: Understanding

Various groups in this period of colonial history seized on the language of freedom to advance their goals. Analyze how these groups defined freedom and used its language. How successful were they in achieving their goals?

ANS:

Answers will vary

DIF: Moderate

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Political History | Social History | The Holy Experiment | The Glorious Revolution in America | A Diverse Population | Religious Diversity | Regional Diversity | North America at Mid-Century

MSC: Analyzing

William Penn called his colony a “holy experiment.” Chronicle the development of Pennsylvania, with particular attention to the advantages that the colony offered to settlers. What liberties were guaranteed and to whom? Why and how did conflicts with the Indians start?

ANS:

Answers will vary

DIF: Moderate

OBJ: 1. Explain how the English empire in America expanded in the mid-seventeenth century.

TOP: Cultural History | Political History | Social History | The Holy Experiment | Land in Pennsylvania MSC: Understanding

The Glorious Revolution solidified the notion that liberty was a birthright of the Englishman. Explain how the Glorious Revolution contributed to this idea and how it subsequently affected the colonies. Did all of the colonists react to the Glorious Revolution in the same way? If there were differences, what were they? How was the language of liberty used?

ANS:

Answers will vary

DIF: Moderate

OBJ: 3. Identify the major social and political crises that rocked the colonies in the late seventeenth century.

TOP: Political History | Social History | Global Awareness | The Glorious Revolution | The Glorious Revolution in America MSC: Analyzing

“Liberty of conscience,” wrote a German newcomer in 1739, was the “chief virtue” of British North America, “and on this score I do not repent my immigration.” Explain what he meant by that remark. What did immigrants find attractive about the British colonies? What liberties and freedoms were available to the newcomers?

ANS:

Answers will vary

DIF: Moderate

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Political History | Social History | Global Awareness | Ethnicity | Primary Document Analysis | Religious Diversity | A Diverse Population MSC: Applying

“North America at mid-eighteenth century was home to a remarkable diversity of people and different kinds of social organization.” In a thoughtful essay, defend this statement, touching on each of the colonies, the various groups of people living in those colonies, and the freedoms and liberties extended to them.

ANS:

Answers will vary

DIF: Moderate

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies.

TOP: Ethnicity | Social History | Political History | Religious Diversity | A Diverse Population | Regional Diversity | The Colonial Elite | The Middle Ranks | New York and the Rights of Englishmen and Englishwomen | The Founding of Carolina | The Holy Experiment | Land in Pennsylvania | Colonial Cities | Women and the Household Economy MSC: Evaluating

By the 1750s, North American colonists possessed a dual identity: they were both British in their attempts at Anglicization and also distinctly American. What factors contributed to this dual identity? What reinforced the British identity? What reinforced the American identity? Be sure to discuss political, cultural, social, and economic aspects of society.

ANS:

Answers will vary

DIF: Moderate

OBJ: 4. Describe the directions of social and economic change in the eighteenth-century colonies. | 5. Explain how the patterns of class and gender roles changed in eighteenth-century America.

TOP: Ethnicity | Social History | Political History | Cultural History | Economic Development | Anglicization | Poverty in the Colonies | An Atlantic World | Religious Diversity | Regional Diversity

MSC: Analyzing

Explain how and why tobacco planters in the Chesapeake region came to rely on African slaves rather than European indentured servants over the course of the seventeenth century. At what point did the Chesapeake become a “slave society” rather than merely a “society with slaves”?

ANS:

Answers will vary

DIF: Moderate OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Civil Rights | Social History | Political History | Cultural History | Economic Development | The Rise of Chesapeake Slavery | Bacon’s Rebellion: Land and Labor in Virginia | Bacon’s Rebellion: Land and Labor in Virginia | A Slave Society MSC: Analyzing

The line between slavery and freedom was more permeable in the seventeenth century than it would become later. Explain how slavery was treated in the seventeenth century by discussing the law, customs, and liberties extended to slaves. What contributed to the hardening of the line between slavery and freedom?

ANS:

Answers will vary

DIF: Moderate OBJ: 2. Explain how slavery was established in the Western Atlantic world.

TOP: Civil Rights | Social History | Political History | Cultural History | Economic Development | Slavery and the Law | A Slave Society | The Rise of Chesapeake Slavery | Englishmen and Africans

MSC: Understanding

Explain why the colonies had fewer people in poverty than England. What economic and social conditions were at the root of this difference? For those who were in poverty in the colonies, what led to this condition increasing in the eighteenth century, and what was life like for them?

ANS:

Answers will vary

DIF: Moderate

OBJ: 5. Explain how the patterns of class and gender roles changed in eighteenth-century America.

TOP: Social History | Economic Development | Poverty in the Colonies | The Middle Ranks | North America at Mid-Century MSC: Evaluating

CHAPTER 5: The American Revolution, 1763-1783

MULTIPLE CHOICE

The attack by Massachusetts colonists on the home of lieutenant governor and chief justice Thomas Hutchinson:

a. convinced him that the Stamp Act, which he had previously supported, was unwise.

b. physically assaulted Hutchinson’s family, an act that prompted Great Britain to clamp down on colonial liberties.

c. resulted from protests over the Stamp Act.

d. led Parliament to repeal the Townshend Acts immediately.

e. included Samuel and John Adams.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 140

OBJ: 1. Describe the roots and significance of the Stamp Act controversy.

TOP: Political History | Introduction MSC: Understanding

After what major event did the British government make the colonies bear part of the cost of the empire?

a. The Declaration of Independence.

b. King Philip’s War.

c. The Seven Years’ War.

d. The Boston Tea Party.

e. The appointment of William Pitt as British prime minister.

ANS: C DIF: Easy REF: p. 141

OBJ: 1. Describe the roots and significance of the Stamp Act controversy.

TOP: Global Awareness | Military History | Consolidating the Empire

MSC: Remembering

Virtual representation was the idea:

a. that only those who were elected by a given population could represent that population in a legislative body.

b. about representation that most politically active American colonists in the 1760s and 1770s embraced.

c. endorsed by the Stamp Act Congress in 1765.

d. that each member of Britain’s House of Commons represented the entire empire, not just his own district.

e. that the king should appoint delegates to represent the colonies in the British House of Commons.

ANS: D DIF: Moderate REF: p. 141

OBJ: 1. Describe the roots and significance of the Stamp Act controversy.

TOP: Political History | Consolidating the Empire MSC: Understanding

The Sugar Act alarmed colonists, in part because it:

a. increased the tax on molasses and made rum more expensive to produce.

b. made sugar, a key consumer good, too expensive.

c. mandated that violators of the act be tried in a court with a jury.

d. eliminated the admiralty courts, which colonists had long favored.

e. was an attempt to get them to pay a levy they would otherwise have evaded.

ANS: E DIF: Difficult REF: p. 142

OBJ: 1. Describe the roots and significance of the Stamp Act controversy.

TOP: Economic Development | Taxing the Colonies MSC: Understanding

The Stamp Act created such a stir in the colonies because:

a. it raised prices on printed products so much that most colonists no longer could afford to buy books and newspapers.

b. lawyers were offended that they could be jailed for not using the correct stamp on legal documents.

c. it was the first direct tax Parliament imposed on the colonies.

d. none of the revenue raised would be spent within the colonies themselves.

e. Benjamin Franklin went public with his opposition to it.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 142

OBJ: 1. Describe the roots and significance of the Stamp Act controversy.

TOP: Political History | The Stamp Act Crisis MSC: Understanding

What contribution did the Stamp Act episode make to the colonists’ concept of liberty?

a. The elite became more aware of liberty, but the lower classes remained unconcerned, choosing instead just to follow leaders who encouraged them to riot.

b. The Stamp Act Congress insisted that the right to consent to taxation was essential to people’s freedom.

c. It led the Stamp Act Congress to adopt the Declaratory Act, which defined American liberties.

d. It convinced colonists that revolting against Great Britain was the only way to secure their liberties.

e. Requiring everyone freed from jail to wear a stamp reminded colonists that they were prisoners of the British empire.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: pp. 142–143

OBJ: 1. Describe the roots and significance of the Stamp Act controversy.

TOP: Political History | Taxation and Representation MSC: Understanding

What was the key political origin of the American Revolution?

a. The Sugar Act financially hurt New England merchants.

b. The Stamp Act was a tax that most colonists had to pay.

c. The colonists did not like a westward barrier to settlements.

d. The colonists criticized the lack of representation in Parliament.

e. The colonists did not want the writs of assistance to be used.

ANS: D DIF: Difficult REF: p. 143

OBJ: 1. Describe the roots and significance of the Stamp Act controversy.

TOP: Political History | Changes | Taxation and Representation | The Declaration of Independence

MSC: Understanding

In regards to the Stamp Act Congress of 1765, which statement was true?

a. The Congress wanted to stop written protests of the tax.

b. The Congress hoped to end boycotts.

c. According to the Congress, colonial governors should make decisions unilaterally.

d. The Congress did not want the colonies to work together.

e. The Congress did not look to declare independence from England.

ANS: E DIF: Moderate REF: p. 143

OBJ: 1. Describe the roots and significance of the Stamp Act controversy.

TOP: Political History | Changes | Taxation and Representation

MSC: Analyzing

What impact did the Committees of Correspondence have in America?

a. They allowed for good communication between the colonists and their Indian allies.

b. Enforcement of taxes and regulations became more efficient.

c. These networks allowed slaves to communicate about escaping from their owners.

d. Colonial leaders were able to spread ideas and information of resistance to taxes more quickly.

e. The first committee started in Charleston, South Carolina, and more were created in other colonies except New England.

ANS: D DIF: Moderate REF: p. 144

OBJ: 1. Describe the roots and significance of the Stamp Act controversy.

TOP: Political History | Liberty and Resistance MSC: Remembering

The Sons of Liberty:

a. enjoyed support from New York craftsmen and laborers.

b. won widespread support from New York’s upper classes.

c. opposed any violent response to the Stamp Act.

d. prompted founder Samuel Adams and his cousin John Adams to break off relations.

e. caused the Boston Massacre in 1765.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 144

OBJ: 2. Identify the key events that sharpened the divisions between Britain and the colonists in the late 1760s and early 1770s. TOP: Social History | Liberty and Resistance

MSC: Remembering

The Declaratory Act:

a. imposed a boycott on all manufactured goods produced in the colonies.

b. declared that colonists had to house British soldiers in their homes.

c. closed the Port of Boston because of the Boston Tea Party.

d. rejected American claims that only their elected representatives could levy taxes.

e. proclaimed the colonies’ independence from Great Britain.

ANS: D DIF: Moderate REF: p. 144

OBJ: 1. Describe the roots and significance of the Stamp Act controversy.

TOP: Political History | Liberty and Resistance MSC: Analyzing

What political movement of the seventeenth century resembled the 1760s Regulator movement in South Carolina?

a. The Salem witch trials. d. Dominion of New England.

b. Leisler’s Rebellion. e. Bacon’s Rebellion.

c. King Philip’s War.

ANS: E DIF: Difficult REF: p. 145

OBJ: 2. Identify the key events that sharpened the divisions between Britain and the colonists in the late 1760s and early 1770s. TOP: Political History | Changes | The Regulators

MSC: Evaluating

What idea did both the Regulators and Stamp Act Congress share?

a. There should be no taxes under any circumstances.

b. Colonists wanted to be represented in the government.

c. Colonial governors should make decisions unilaterally.

d. Boycotts did not work as a means of protest.

e. Native Americans should remain in control of land west of the Appalachians.

ANS: B DIF: Difficult REF: p. 143 | p. 145

OBJ: 1. Describe the roots and significance of the Stamp Act controversy.

TOP: Political History | Changes | Taxation and Representation | The Regulators

MSC: Evaluating

Which armed group, motivated by deep frustrations with the corruption of North Carolina’s county officials, was defeated by the colony’s militia at the 1771 Battle of Alamance?

a. The Sons of Liberty. d. The Association.

b. The Regulators. e. The Rangers.

c. The Paxton Boys.

ANS: B DIF: Difficult REF: p. 145

OBJ: 2. Identify the key events that sharpened the divisions between Britain and the colonists in the late 1760s and early 1770s. TOP: Political History | The Regulators

MSC: Remembering

Unlike the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts focused on:

a. taxing goods imported into the colonies.

b. taxing legal documents.

c. sugar and rum.

d. creating more smuggling opportunities.

e. raising revenue to pay the salaries of colonial assembly members.

ANS: A DIF: Easy REF: pp. 145–146

OBJ: 2. Identify the key events that sharpened the divisions between Britain and the colonists in the late 1760s and early 1770s. TOP: Political History | The Townshend Crisis

MSC: Understanding

The “Daughters of Liberty” was the name given to:

a. the female children of the Founding Fathers, especially the daughters of Washington, Adams, and Jefferson.

b. New England women who won voting rights in the 1770s.

c. the brave women who cared for wounded soldiers during the early battles of the Revolution.

d. women who spun and wove to create their own clothing rather than buy British goods.

e. the first national women’s patriotic organization, which raised money to provide supplies for the Continental army after Saratoga.

ANS: D DIF: Moderate REF: p. 146

OBJ: 2. Identify the key events that sharpened the divisions between Britain and the colonists in the late 1760s and early 1770s. TOP: Social History | The Townshend Crisis

MSC: Remembering

The Boston Massacre occurred when British soldiers:

a. killed Indians who were raiding frontier towns.

b. fired into a mob and killed a number of Boston residents.

c. captured members of the Sons of Liberty involved in the Boston Tea Party.

d. fired on local minutemen guarding an arsenal.

e. tried to defend Thomas Hutchinson from an angry mob.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: pp. 146–147

OBJ: 2. Identify the key events that sharpened the divisions between Britain and the colonists in the late 1760s and early 1770s. TOP: Social History | The Boston Massacre

MSC: Remembering

Crispus Attucks:

a. defended in court the British soldiers who participated in the Boston Massacre.

b. organized the boycott of British imports following the Townshend Act.

c. was the first person of mixed race to serve in the Continental Congress.

d. was a man of mixed race who was killed at the Boston Massacre.

e. died bravely at the Battle of Concord.

ANS: D DIF: Difficult REF: p. 147

OBJ: 2. Identify the key events that sharpened the divisions between Britain and the colonists in the late 1760s and early 1770s. TOP: Social History | The Boston Massacre

MSC: Remembering

The expulsion of the journalist John Wilkes from his seat in Parliament:

a. symbolized the threat to liberty for many in both Britain and America.

b. pleased most American colonists because of Wilkes’s pro-Stamp Act editorials.

c. resulted from a column Wilkes wrote that was sympathetic toward those killed in the Boston Massacre.

d. came after a London jury convicted him of colluding with pro-independence colonists.

e. was reversed by the king, which led to a British constitutional crisis that diverted attention from the colonies.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 147

OBJ: 2. Identify the key events that sharpened the divisions between Britain and the colonists in the late 1760s and early 1770s. TOP: Global Awareness | Wilkes and Liberty

MSC: Understanding

The treatment of John Wilkes resembled which act of Parliament against the colonies?

a. Tea Act. d. Townshend Duties.

b. Quebec Act. e. Intolerable Acts.

c. Sugar Act.

ANS: E DIF: Difficult REF: p. 147

OBJ: 2. Identify the key events that sharpened the divisions between Britain and the colonists in the late 1760s and early 1770s. TOP: Political History | Changes | Wilkes and Liberty

MSC: Applying

Why did colonists object to the Tea Act?

a. Because it would aid a different part of the empire than their own, colonists felt that this was the kind of discriminatory action that violated the concept of liberty.

b. By paying it, they would be acknowledging Great Britain’s right to tax the colonists.

c. It granted a monopoly, and the colonists opposed all forms of monopoly.

d. The British East India Company made inferior tea, and colonists preferred not to drink it.

e. It raised the tax on tea so much as to make tea prohibitively expensive.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 148

OBJ: 2. Identify the key events that sharpened the divisions between Britain and the colonists in the late 1760s and early 1770s. TOP: Political History | The Tea Act

MSC: Understanding

Which of the following was associated with the Intolerable Acts?

a. For the first time, British authorities stationed soldiers in Boston.

b. Parliament closed all American ports to all trade until the tea destroyed by the Boston Tea Party was paid for.

c. The Massachusetts Charter of 1691 was changed to curtail town meetings.

d. The office of governor of Massachusetts became an elected position.

e. Colonists were prevented from producing items made from glass, paper, or lead.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 148

OBJ: 2. Identify the key events that sharpened the divisions between Britain and the colonists in the late 1760s and early 1770s. TOP: Political History | The Intolerable Acts

MSC: Remembering

What prevents a law like the Intolerable Acts from occurring in the United States today?

a. The Declaration of Independence. d. State governors.

b. The Writs of Assistance. e. The president.

c. The Bill of Rights.

ANS: C DIF: Difficult REF: p. 148

OBJ: 2. Identify the key events that sharpened the divisions between Britain and the colonists in the late 1760s and early 1770s. TOP: Political History | Changes | The Intolerable Acts

MSC: Understanding

The Quebec Act:

a. granted religious toleration to Catholics in Canada.

b. placed a tax on all imported goods from Canada.

c. removed the Ohio River Valley from the province of Quebec.

d. called for Canada to join America in the struggle for independence.

e. created Quebec out of the preexisting provinces of Ontario and New Brunswick.

ANS: A DIF: Moderate REF: p. 149

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Political History | The Intolerable Acts MSC: Remembering

What were the Suffolk Resolves?

a. The peace treaty that ended the Regulator movement in North Carolina.

b. A list of demands addressed to landlords, made in 1772 by New York tenant farmers.

c. A group of anti-Tea Act petitions from Boston merchants to the Massachusetts royal governor.

d. The resolutions pledging the Continental Congress’s loyalty to King George III in 1775.

e. A set of resolutions made in 1774, urging Massachusetts citizens to prepare for war.

ANS: E DIF: Difficult REF: p. 149

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Political History | The Continental Congress MSC: Remembering

At the first Continental Congress, who declared, “I am not a Virginian, but an American”?

a. Thomas Jefferson. d. Patrick Henry.

b. George Washington. e. Edmund Randolph.

c. Richard Henry Lee.

ANS: D DIF: Moderate REF: p. 149

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Political History | The Continental Congress MSC: Remembering

The Committees of Safety:

a. served to warn colonists if the Royal Navy was approaching.

b. were part of a series of efforts by the Continental Congress to promote unity and to take action against enemies of liberty.

c. killed twenty-eight Loyalists before the Revolutionary War began.

d. took action against Catholics trying to spread Quebec’s influence.

e. were designed to protect British officials like Thomas Hutchinson but attracted too small a number of members to succeed.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 150

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Political History | The Continental Association MSC: Understanding

In the years immediately before the American Revolution, the concept of natural rights:

a. greatly influenced Thomas Jefferson’s early writings.

b. prompted Thomas Jefferson to support independence before the war even began.

c. caused many American colonists to call for the abolition of the monarchy.

d. contradicted the argument for colonial resistance.

e. led to Parliament’s passage of the Declaratory Act of 1766.

ANS: A DIF: Difficult REF: p. 150

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Political History | The Sweets of Liberty MSC: Understanding

Which of the following was a significant battle during the first year of the Revolutionary War?

a. Yorktown, a siege in Virginia.

b. Monmouth, where the opposing armies fought to a draw.

c. Bunker Hill, where the British suffered heavy casualties trying to dislodge colonial militiamen.

d. Saratoga, where a large British army surrendered.

e. Cowpens, which helped turn the tide of war in the South.

ANS: C DIF: Difficult REF: p. 151

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Chronology | Military History | The Outbreak of War MSC: Remembering

When the Second Continental Congress created an official army, how did the British respond?

a. They removed British troops from Boston.

b. They declared that the colonies were in a state of rebellion.

c. They asked the Spanish and French for help to defeat the Americans.

d. They sent diplomats to negotiate for peace.

e. They did not take the actions of Congress seriously because to them George Washington was an inexperienced commander.

ANS: B DIF: Moderate REF: p. 151

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Social History | The Outbreak of War MSC: Understanding

What did Lord Dunmore do that outraged many southerners?

a. He encouraged Indians to conduct raids against backcountry settlements in the Carolinas.

b. He issued a proclamation freeing all slaves south of the Ohio River.

c. He promised freedom to slaves who joined the British cause.

d. He confiscated property of Loyalists.

e. He circulated germ-ridden blankets among frontier towns to spread disease.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 152

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Social History | Independence? MSC: Remembering

Who warned that independence would lead to disunity in the colonies?

a. Ben Franklin. d. George Washington.

b. Sam Adams. e. Joseph Galloway.

c. Ethan Allen.

ANS: E DIF: Difficult REF: p. 152

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Political History | Independence? MSC: Remembering

Thomas Paine’s Common Sense:

a. argued that the British governmental system was perfectly good but that current officials had corrupted it.

b. made highly original arguments in favor of independence.

c. sold well among the elite, who in turn were able to convey its ideas to the lower classes.

d. argued that America would become the home of freedom and “an asylum for mankind.”

e. led to his arrest on charges of treason, but he saved himself by writing another pamphlet taking the opposite position.

ANS: D DIF: Moderate REF: p. 153

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Primary Document Analysis | Paine’s Common Sense MSC: Understanding

What made Thomas Paine’s Common Sense a unique document?

a. It was the only document in 1776 calling for American independence.

b. It was mostly original in its ideas and concepts.

c. It wanted the United States to form a representative government.

d. It expanded the size of the public sphere, going beyond the elite.

e. It talked about how American commerce would flourish even more once it was no longer under British regulations.

ANS: D DIF: Difficult REF: p. 153

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Primary Document Analysis | Paine’s Impact MSC: Understanding

Who wrote the following: “One of the strongest natural proofs of the folly of hereditary right in kings is that nature disapproves it, otherwise she would not so frequently turn it into ridicule, by giving mankind an ass for a lion”?

a. Thomas Jefferson. d. Ben Franklin.

b. Jonathan Boucher. e. Thomas Paine.

c. Samuel Seabury.

ANS: E DIF: Moderate REF: p. 157

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Primary Document Analysis | Voices of Freedom document | Common Sense

MSC: Applying

In what ways was Thomas Paine’s Common Sense similar to Thomas Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence?

a. Both Jefferson and Paine discussed how the United States could create a navy.

b. Both showed how a king can be a tyrant.

c. Paine used many Latin phrases, which led Jefferson to do the same.

d. Paine criticized using slaves from Africa, and that same criticism appeared in the Declaration of Independence.

e. Both documents contradicted the ideas of John Locke.

ANS: B DIF: Difficult REF: pp. 152–153 | p. 157

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Primary Document Analysis | Voices of Freedom document | Common Sense | Paine’s Common Sense MSC: Evaluating

Who was Samuel Seabury?

a. He was a Revolutionary War hero for the Americans.

b. He served in the Continental Congress from New York.

c. As a minister, he led colonial protests against British taxes.

d. He was a British general who chased after Washington’s army.

e. As a colonial minister, he remained a British Loyalist.

ANS: E DIF: Difficult REF: p. 156

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Primary Document Analysis | Voices of Freedom document | Common Sense

MSC: Applying

In his document “An Alarm to the Legislature of the Province in New-York,” the minister Samuel Seabury equated freedom with:

a. religion. d. property ownership.

b. British tyranny. e. Indians’ right to use land.

c. sedition.

ANS: C DIF: Moderate REF: p. 156

OBJ: 3. Identify the key events that marked the move toward American independence.

TOP: Primary Document Analysis | Voices of Freedom document | Common Sense

MSC: Applying

Most of the text of the Declaration of Independence:

a. was originally drafted by Benjamin Franklin and then brilliantly edited by Thomas Jefferson.

b. consists of a list of grievances against King George III.

c. is an updated version of John Locke’s classic, The Rights of Man.

d. specifically attacks the idea that Parliament has a right to enact any laws for the colonies.

e. is an irrefutable argument for the notion of virtual representation.

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