Intermediate Accounting Volume 1, 11th Canadian Edition by Bruce J. McConomy; Donald E. Kieso – Test Bank +A

$35.00
Intermediate Accounting Volume 1, 11th Canadian Edition by Bruce J. McConomy; Donald E. Kieso – Test Bank +A

Intermediate Accounting Volume 1, 11th Canadian Edition by Bruce J. McConomy; Donald E. Kieso – Test Bank +A

$35.00
Intermediate Accounting Volume 1, 11th Canadian Edition by Bruce J. McConomy; Donald E. Kieso – Test Bank +A
  1. Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective. It is critical to understand a transaction from a business perspective before attempting to account for it. The analysis should begin with what is being sold to the customer (goods or services) and note also the nature and amount of the consideration. When one party is in a better bargaining position than the other, it may be able to negotiate concessions such as more lenient payment terms. These concessions often complicate the accounting as they introduce measurement uncertainty in many cases.

Selling transactions are based on contractual arrangements between a buyer and a seller. Contracts create rights and obligations under law that must be considered when accounting for the transactions. In addition to contractual law, rights and obligations may exist under other forms of the law, such as common law or contract law. These should also be considered.

  1. Identify the five steps in the revenue recognition process. The five steps in the revenue recognition process are (1) identify the contract with customers, (2) identify the separate performance obligations in the contract, (3) determine the transaction price, (4) allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations, and (5) recognize revenue when each performance obligation is satisfied.

  1. Identify the contract with customers. A contract is an agreement that creates enforceable rights or obligations. A company applies the revenue guidance to contracts with customers and must determine if new performance obligations are created by a contract modification.

  1. Identify the separate performance obligations in the contract. A performance obligation is a promise in a contract to provide a product or service to a customer. A contract may be composed of multiple performance obligations. The accounting for multiple performance obligations is based on evaluation of whether the product or service is distinct within the contract. If each of the goods or services is distinct, but is interdependent and interrelated, these goods and services are combined and reported as one performance obligation.

  1. Determine the transaction price. The transaction price is the amount of consideration that a company expects to receive from a customer in exchange for transferring goods and services. In determining the transaction price, companies must consider the following factors: (1) variable consideration, (2) time value of money, (3) noncash consideration, and (4) consideration paid or payable to a customer.

  1. Allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations. If more than one performance obligation exists in a contract, allocate the transaction price based on relative fair values. The best measure of fair value is what the good or service could be sold for on a stand-alone basis (stand-alone selling price). Estimates of stand-alone selling price can be based on (1) adjusted market assessment, (2) expected cost plus a margin approach, or (3) a residual approach.

  1. Understand how to recognize revenue when the company satisfies its performance obligation. A company satisfies its performance obligation when the customer obtains control of the good or service. Companies satisfy performance obligations either at a point in time or over a period of time. Companies recognize revenue over a period of time if (1) the customer controls the asset as it is created or the company does not have an alternative use for the asset, and (2) the company has a right to payment.

  1. Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach. Under ASPE, the revenues are earned when the risks and rewards of ownership are passed or when the company has done what it said it would do to be entitled to the revenues. Where sale of goods is involved, legal title and possession provide evidence of this. The accounting is more complex when the contract is a long-term contract and when it involves both goods and services.

  1. Identify other revenue recognition issues. Refer to Illustration 6-29 for a summary of the accounting for (1) right of return, (2) repurchase agreements, (3) bill-and-hold sales, (4) principal-agent relationships, (5) consignments, (6) warranties, and (7) non-refundable upfront fees.

  1. Describe presentation and disclosure regarding revenue. Under the asset-liability approach, to recognize revenue, companies present contract assets and contract liabilities on their balance sheets (net). Contract assets are rights to receive consideration. A contract liability is a company’s obligation to transfer goods or services to a customer for which the company has received consideration from the customer. Companies may also report assets associated with fulfillment costs and contract acquisition costs related to a revenue arrangement. Companies disclose qualitative and quantitative information about (1) contracts with customers with disaggregation of revenue, presentation of opening and closing balances in contract assets and contract liabilities, and significant information related to their performance obligations; (2) significant judgements that affect the determination of the transaction price, the allocation of the transaction price, and the determination of the timing of revenue; and (3) assets recognized from costs incurred to fulfill a contract.

  1. Identify differences in accounting between ASPE and IFRS. The main differences are identified in the chart in Illustration 6-34.

  1. 12. Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts. To apply the percentage-of-completion method to long-term contracts, a company must have some basis for measuring the progress toward completion at particular interim dates. One of the most popular input measures used to determine the progress toward completion is the cost-to-cost basis. Using this basis, a company measures the percentage of completion by comparing costs incurred to date with the most recent estimate of the total costs to complete the contract. The company applies that percentage to the total revenue or the estimated total gross profit on the contract, to arrive at the amount of revenue or gross profit to be recognized to date.

  1. Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts. Under this ASPE method, companies recognize revenue and gross profit only when the company completes the contract. The company accumulates costs of long-term contracts in process and current billings. It makes no interim charges or credits to income statement accounts for revenues, costs, and gross profit. The annual journal entries to record costs of construction, progress billings, and collections from customers would be identical to those for the percentage-of-completion method—with the significant exclusion of the recognition of revenue and gross profit.

Multiple Choice—Conceptual

Answer No. Description

a 1. Definition of “acquired”

b 2. Definition of credit risk

c 3. Concept of commercial substance

d 4. Definition of concessionary terms

d 5. Concessionary or abnormal terms

c 6. Definition of constructive obligation

b 7. Allocation of selling price in bundled sales

b 8. Reasons to recognize revenue

a 9. Problems with the earnings approach

b 10. Definition of revenue

a 11. Definition of “recognition.”

c 12. Control of an asset

c 13. Revenue recognition process

c 14. Definition of control

b 15. New IFRS standard

d 16. Measurement uncertainty

b 17. Accounting for a volume rebate

c 18. Definition of onerous contract

d 19. Recording sales when right of return exists

c 20. Recording sales when right of return exists

a 21. Contract signing

d 22. Contract modification

c 23. Performance obligation

b 24. Performance obligation

d 25. Transaction price

c 26. Expected value approach

a 27. Allocation approach

d 28. Selling price of a bundle

b 29. Revenue recognition over a period of time

c 30. Revenue recognition over a period of time

c 31. Definition of earnings process

c 32. Definition of discrete earnings process

d 33. Earnings process

a 34. Critical event

b 35. Returned asset

a 36. Consignment sales

b 37. Consignment sales—consignor vs. consignee

d 38. Consignment sales—revenue recognition

a 39. Revenue recognition in consignment sales

d 40. Contract liability

a 41. Conditional rights

b 42. Right to return under IFRS

a 43. Long-term contract revenue under APSE

a 44. ASPE requirements

c 45. ASPE requirements

b 46. Accounting for long-term contracts – principal factors

b 47. Preferred method under ASPE

Answer No. Description

c 48. Classification of progress billings and construction in process

a 49. Disclosure of earned but unbilled revenues

b 50. Disadvantage of using percentage-of-completion method

c 51. Measuring progress of long-term contracts

c 52. Measuring progress of long-term contracts

d 53. Revenue, cost, and gross profit under completed-contract method

a 54. Recognition of loss on long-term contract

c 55. Recognition of loss on long-term contract

a 56. Completed-contract method

b 57. Completed-contract method

d 58. Recognition of loss on long-term contract

c 59. Measuring progress of long-term contracts

b 60. Measuring progress of long-term contracts

Multiple Choice—Computational

Answer No. Description

a 61. Revenue to be recognized under collection uncertainty

d 62. Calculation of the net contract position – contract-based approach

d 63. Sales on consignment

b 64. Reporting inventory on consignment

b 65. Calculate contract costs incurred during year.

b 66. Bundled sales – application of the relative fair value method

c 67. Bundled sales – application of the residual value method

d 68. Calculate gross profit using percentage-of-completion method.

a 69. Calculate gross profit using completed-contract method.

d 70. Calculate gross profit using completed-contract method.

c 71. Revenue to be recognized from consignment sales

c 72. Gross profit to be recognized using percentage-of-completion

b 73. Gross profit to be recognized using percentage-of-completion

b 74. Calculate cash collected on long-term construction contract

d 75. Calculate gross profit using percentage-of-completion

c 76. Gross profit to be recognized using percentage-of-completion

b 77. Gross profit to be recognized using percentage-of-completion

c 78. Gross profit to be recognized using completed-contract method

b 79. Gross profit to be recognized using percentage-of-completion

c 80. Calculate total construction costs

a 81. Application of the percentage-of-completion method

a 82. Gross profit to be recognized using completed-contract method

c 83. Gross profit or loss to be recognized using completed-contract method

d 84. Gross profit to be recognized using completed-contract method

c 85. Reporting a current liability with completed-contract method

a 86. Reporting assets under completed-contract method

Exercises

Item Description

E6-87 Constructive obligation

E6-88 Economies of a transaction

E6-89 Concessionary terms

E6-90 Definitions

E6-91 Terminology

E6-92 Revenue recognition process

E6-93 Revenue recognition process

E6-94 Contract identification

E6-95 Contract identification

E6-96 Performance obligations

E6-97 Performance obligations

E6-98 Sales with discounts

E6-99 Transaction price

E6-100 Allocate transaction price

E6-101 Discounted transaction price

E6-102 Bundled sales

E6-103 Contract-based approach

E6-104 Timing of revenue recognition

E6-105 Timing of revenue recognition/percentage of completion

E6-106 Percentage-of-completion method

E6-107 Risks & rewards of ownership

E6-108 Earnings approach to revenue recognition

E6-109 Percentage-of-completion method

E6-110 Performance obligations and warranties

E6-111 Revenue recognition

E6-112 Consignment sale

E6-113 Reporting of gross or net revenues

E6-114 Presentation & the percentage-of-completion method

E6-115 Percentage-of-completion method

PROBLEMS

Item Description

P6-116 Long-term contract (contract-based approach)

P6-117 Long-term construction project accounting

P6-118 Accounting for long-term construction contracts

P6-119 Percentage-of-completion and completed-contract methods

P6-120 Percentage-of-completion and completed-contract methods

P6-121 Completed-contract method

P6-122 Consignment sales

MULTIPLE CHOICE—Conceptual

  1. When dealing with sales agreements, “acquired” means
  2. a) consideration or rights to consideration.
  3. b) goods to be delivered in the future.
  4. c) dealing at arm’s length.
  5. d) measurement of the transaction.

Answer: a

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a siness perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. If an entity sells on credit, the risk that the customer will not pay is called
  2. a) price risk.
  3. b) credit risk.
  4. c) commercial substance.
  5. d) credit policy.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Finance

CPA: Financial Reporting

CPA: Strategy and Governance

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. The concept of commercial substance in purchase and sales transactions means that
  2. a) the transaction is a bona fide purchase and sale.
  3. b) the entity’s cash flows are expected to change.
  4. c) the transaction is a bona fide purchase and sale, and the entity’s cash flows are expected to change.
  5. d) the transaction must involve tangible assets.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Terms negotiated by a party to the contract that are more favourable than normal are called
  2. a) credit terms.
  3. b) barter transactions.
  4. c) arm’s length terms.
  5. d) concessionary terms.

Answer: d

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Concessionary or abnormal terms may
  2. a) reflect that risks and reward has not yet passed to the customer.
  3. b) create additional recognition and measurement uncertainty.
  4. c) indicate that no sale has taken place at all.
  5. d) all of the above

Answer: d

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. In many cases, an entity may have an implicit obligation even if it is NOT explicitly noted in a sales contract. This is called a(n)
  2. a) onerous obligation.
  3. b) legal obligation.
  4. c) constructive obligation.
  5. d) earnings obligation.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. When a sale involves goods and services, the selling price should NOT be
  2. a) allocated to each of these parts.
  3. b) allocated only to the part with the higher value.
  4. c) allocated using the relative fair value method.
  5. d) allocated using the residual method.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Under the earnings approach for the sale of goods, which of the following would NOT be a reason to recognize revenue?
  2. a) The risks and rewards are transferred to the buyer.
  3. b) The vendor continues to have control over the goods sold.
  4. c) Collectability is reasonably assured.
  5. d) Costs and revenues can be reliably measured.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Revenue from selling products is generally recognized
  2. a) at the point of delivery.
  3. b) at the completion of production.
  4. c) after costs are recovered.
  5. d) as cash is collected.

Answer: a

Difficulty: MediumLearning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective. Section Reference: Fundamentals of Understanding Sales Transactions

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. A credit that is realized through an entity’s ordinary activities would be treated as
  2. a) a gain.
  3. b) revenue.
  4. c) other income.
  5. d) other comprehensive income.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. According to the AcSB guidelines, the process of reporting an item in the financial statements of an entity is
  2. a) recognition.
  3. b) realization.
  4. c) allocation.
  5. d) matching.

Answer: a

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

  1. Control of an asset normally coincides with
  2. a) transfer of possession to the buyer.
  3. b) transfer of legal title to the buyer.
  4. c) transfer of both possession and legal title to the buyer.
  5. d) the receipt of payment from the buyer.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

Learning Objective: Identify the five steps in the revenue recognition process.

Section Reference: Five-Step Revenue Recognition Process—Example

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. The first step in the revenue recognition process under IFRS is
  2. a) determine the transaction price.
  3. b) identify the separate performance obligations of the contract.
  4. c) identify the contract with customers.
  5. d) allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

Learning Objective: Identify the five steps in the revenue recognition process.

Section Reference: Five-Step Revenue Recognition Process—Example

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Which of the following is NOT part of the definition of control?
  2. a) ability to direct use of the asset
  3. b) ability to obtain substantially all remaining benefits of the asset
  4. c) ability to return the asset to its original owner
  5. d) ability to prevent other companies from directing the use or receiving benefits from assets

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

Learning Objective: Understand how to recognize revenue when the company satisfies its performance obligation.

Section Reference: Recognizing Revenue When (or as) Each Performance Obligation Is Satisfied—Step 5

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. The new IFRS standard, IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers adopts a(n)
  2. a) earnings approach to revenue recognition.
  3. b) asset-liability approach to revenue recognition.
  4. c) cash-based approach to revenue recognition.
  5. d) earned and realized approach to revenue recognition.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Identify the five steps in the revenue recognition process.

Section Reference: Five-Step Revenue Recognition Process—Example

Learning Objective: Identify differences in accounting between IFRS and ASPE and potential changes.

Section Reference: IFRS/ASPE Comparison

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Measurement uncertainty does NOT arise from
  2. a) the inability to reasonably estimate related costs of the transaction.
  3. b) the inability to reasonably estimate the consideration of the transaction.
  4. c) the ability to measure the outcome of the transaction.
  5. d) the inability to allocate costs already recorded to the correct account.

Answer: d

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Identify the contract with customers.

Section Reference: Identifying the Contract with Customers—Step 1

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Under IFRS, when a vendor gives a volume rebate to a customer, the vendor should account for it as a(n)
  2. a) expense.
  3. b) reduction of revenue.
  4. c) reduction of inventory.
  5. d) other gain or loss.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Identify the contract with customers.

Section Reference: Identifying the Contract with Customers—Step 1

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. When a contract becomes unprofitable to an entity, this is called a(n)
  2. a) uncompleted contract.
  3. b) zero-profit contract.
  4. c) onerous contract.
  5. d) unenforceable contract.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Identify the contract with customers.

Section Reference: Identifying the Contract with Customers—Step 1

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. When a vendor is exposed to continued risks of ownership because of potential return of the product, which of the following accounting procedures should NOT be used?
  2. a) recording the sale, and accounting for returns as they occur in future periods
  3. b) not recording the sale until all return privileges have expired
  4. c) recording the sale, but reducing revenue by an estimate of future returns
  5. d) recording the sale, but ignoring future returns

Answer: d

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Identify the contract with customers.

Section Reference: Identifying the Contract with Customers—Step 1

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Under the earnings approach, if a company sells its product but gives the buyer the right to return the product, revenue from the sales transaction should be recognized at the time of sale if
  2. a) the market for returnable goods is untested.
  3. b) there is a transfer of the risks and rewards of ownership.
  4. c) the amount of future returns can be reasonably estimated.
  5. d) the amount of goods returned is likely to be high.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Identify the contract with customers.

Section Reference: Identifying the Contract with Customers—Step 1

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. At the time of contract signing,
  2. a) no journal entry is recorded.
  3. b) a contract liability is recorded.
  4. c) a contract asset is recorded.
  5. d) a note to the financial statements must be included.

Answer: a

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Identify the contract with customers.

Section Reference: Identifying the Contract with Customers—Step 1

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. When contract modification occurs, and the company determines a new contract and performance obligation has resulted,
  2. a) the accounting for the original contract must be modified to reflect the new contract.
  3. b) the original contract remains the same.
  4. c) the new contract must be recorded separately.
  5. d) Both b) and c) are correct.

Answer: d

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Identify the contract with customers.

Section Reference: Identifying the Contract with Customers—Step 1

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. To determine if a performance obligation exists,
  2. a) the company must provide a distinct product or service.
  3. b) a customer must be able to benefit from the product or service.
  4. c) Both a) and b) are correct.
  5. d) none of the above

Answer: c

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Identify the separate performance obligations in the contract.

Section Reference: Identifying Separate Performance Obligations—Step 2

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Where there are potentially multiple performance obligations within a single contract, if products or services are interdependent and interrelated, they must be
  2. a) accounted for as multiple performance obligations.
  3. b) combined and reported as a single performance obligation.
  4. c) sold separately.
  5. d) combined under a new contract.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Identify the separate performance obligations in the contract.

Section Reference: Identifying Separate Performance Obligations—Step 2

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. The transaction price recorded by a company should be based on
  2. a) the expected value.
  3. b) the most likely amount.
  4. c) the amount agreed to under contract.
  5. d) Both a) and b) are correct.

Answer: d

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Determine the transaction price.

Section Reference: Determining the Transaction Price—Step 3

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Which of the following is NOT true with regard to the expected value approach to measuring earnings?
  2. a) It must be highly probable that there will not be a significant reversal of revenue previously recognized.
  3. b) The company likely has experience with similar contracts.
  4. c) It must be highly probable that there will be a significant reversal of revenue previously recognized.
  5. d) The company is able to estimate the cumulative amount of net revenue.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Determine the transaction price.

Section Reference: Determining the Transaction Price—Step 3

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Which of the following is NOT an acceptable allocation approach to transaction pricing?
  2. a) expected value approach
  3. b) adjusted market assessment approach
  4. c) expected cost plus a margin approach
  5. d) residual approach

Answer: a

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations.

Section Reference: Allocating the Transaction Price to Separate Performance Obligations—Step 4

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. When a company sells a bundle of goods or services, the selling price of the bundle
  2. a) will always be greater than the sum of individual stand-alone prices.
  3. b) will always be equal to the sum of individual stand-alone prices.
  4. c) may be less than the sum of individual stand-alone prices.
  5. d) will always be less than the sum of individual stand-alone prices.

Answer: d

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations.

Section Reference: Allocating the Transaction Price to Separate Performance Obligations—Step 4

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Which of the following is NOT a scenario under which a company may recognize revenue over a period in time?
  2. a) The customer receives and consumes the benefits as the seller performs.
  3. b) The company’s earnings would be more consistent under this approach.
  4. c) The customer controls the asset as it is created or enhanced.
  5. d) The company does not have an alternative use for the asset created or enhanced.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Understand how to recognize revenue when the company satisfies its performance obligation.

Section Reference: Recognizing Revenue When (or as) Each Performance Obligation Is Satisfied—Step 5

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. The most popular input measure used to determine the progress toward completion in the event a company qualifies to recognize revenue over a period of time is
  2. a) cost-benefit basis.
  3. b) percentage-of-completion basis.
  4. c) cost-to-cost basis.
  5. d) collection basis.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Understand how to recognize revenue when the company satisfies its performance obligation.

Section Reference: Recognizing Revenue When (or as) Each Performance Obligation Is Satisfied—Step 5

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. The actions a company takes to add value are referred to as the
  2. a) critical event.
  3. b) earnings approach.
  4. c) earnings process.
  5. d) risks and rewards of ownership.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. If the earnings process has a critical event, it is often referred to as a
  2. a) point of delivery.
  3. b) constructive obligation.
  4. c) discrete earnings process.
  5. d) transfer of risks and rewards of ownership.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. The earnings process
  2. a) is the same for every company.
  3. b) is unique to each company.
  4. c) is unique to each industry.
  5. d) Both b) and c) are correct.

Answer: d

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. If the earnings process has a critical event, it is referred to as
  2. a) a discrete earnings process.
  3. b) a continuous earnings process.
  4. c) a completed contract.
  5. d) a critical earnings process.

Answer: a

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. A returned asset should be recorded
  2. a) as a direct reduction to inventory.
  3. b) in a separate account from inventory.
  4. c) at the same value it was sold for, without considering impairment.
  5. d) Silly question, returned assets aren’t recorded.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Identify other revenue recognition issues.

Section Reference: Other Revenue Recognition Issues

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Under a consignment arrangement, the risk that merchandise might NOT sell is
  2. a) held with the consignor.
  3. b) held with the consignee.
  4. c) shared by the consignor and the consignee.
  5. d) There is no risk associated with goods held on consignment.

Answer: a

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Identify other revenue recognition issues.

Section Reference: Other Revenue Recognition Issues

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Under a consignment sales arrangement,
  2. a) the consignor receives the merchandise to sell.
  3. b) the consignor retains legal title.
  4. c) the consignee ships the merchandise to the consignor.
  5. d) the consignee retains legal title.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Identify other revenue recognition issues.

Section Reference: Other Revenue Recognition Issues

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Under a consignment sales arrangement, revenue is recognized under the earnings approach
  2. a) upon shipment of the merchandise to the consignee.
  3. b) upon receipt of the merchandise by the consignee.
  4. c) upon sale by the consignee.
  5. d) upon receipt by the consignor of notification of the sale.

Answer: d

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Identify other revenue recognition issues.

Section Reference: Other Revenue Recognition Issues

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. The journal entries to recognize the revenue from a consignment sale would likely be identical under the earnings and the contract-based approaches assuming
  2. a) the contract is entered into at the same time as when control over the goods is passed to the customer.
  3. b) the underlying goods or services are valued under the residual value method.
  4. c) the completed contract method is used.
  5. d) the percentage-of-completion method is used.

Answer: a

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Identify other revenue recognition issues.

Section Reference: Other Revenue Recognition Issues

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. A contract liability is often referred to as
  2. a) a contra-contract asset.
  3. b) a performance obligation.
  4. c) unearned revenue.
  5. d) Both b) and c) are correct.

Answer: d

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Describe presentation and disclosure regarding revenue.

Section Reference: Presentation and Disclosure

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Conditional rights should be reported on the statement of financial position
  2. a) as contract assets.
  3. b) as receivables.
  4. c) only once the conditions have been met.
  5. d) as contract liabilities.

Answer: a

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Describe presentation and disclosure regarding revenue.

Section Reference: Presentation and Disclosure

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Under IFRS, where a right to return exists,
  2. a) sales returns and allowances are recognized as contra accounts to Revenues and Accounts Receivable.
  3. b) a refund liability is recognized.
  4. c) this right is disclosed in the financial statements; no accrual necessary.
  5. d) this right does not need to be disclosed or accrued anywhere.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Identify differences in accounting between IFRS and ASPE and potential changes.

Section Reference: IFRS/ASPE Comparison

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. The appropriate approach to recognize long-term contract revenue under ASPE is
  2. a) earnings approach to revenue recognition.
  3. b) asset-liability approach to revenue recognition.
  4. c) cash-based approach to revenue recognition.
  5. d) earned and realized approach to revenue recognition.

Answer: a

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Identify differences in accounting between IFRS and ASPE and potential changes.

Section Reference: IFRS/ASPE Comparison

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. When there is a continuous earnings process, but the progress toward completion is not measurable, ASPE requires the use of the
  2. a) completed-contract method.
  3. b) percentage-of-completion method.
  4. c) zero-profit method.
  5. d) discrete earnings method.

Answer: a

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Under ASPE, the profession requires that the percentage-of-completion method be used when certain conditions exist. Which of the following is NOT one of those necessary conditions?
  2. a) Estimates of progress toward completion, revenues, and costs are reasonably dependable.
  3. b) The contractor can be expected to perform the contractual obligation.
  4. c) The buyer can be expected to satisfy some of the obligations under the contract.
  5. d) The contract clearly specifies the enforceable rights of the parties, the consideration to be exchanged, and the manner and terms of settlement.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Under ASPE, when selecting an accounting method for a newly contracted long-term construction project, the principal factor to be considered should be
  2. a) the terms of payment in the contract.
  3. b) the degree to which a reliable estimate of the costs to complete and extent of progress toward completion can be made.
  4. c) the method commonly used by the contractor to account for other long-term construction contracts.
  5. d) the inherent nature of the contractor’s technical facilities used in construction.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Under ASPE, when work to be done and costs to be incurred on a long-term contract can be estimated reliably, which of the following methods of revenue recognition is preferable?
  2. a) instalment method
  3. b) percentage-of-completion method
  4. c) completed-contract method
  5. d) zero-profit method

Answer: b

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Under the percentage-of-completion method, how should the balances of progress billings and construction in process be disclosed in the financial statements prior to the completion of the contract?
  2. a) progress billings as deferred income, construction in progress as a deferred expense
  3. b) progress billings as income, construction in process as inventory
  4. c) net, as a current asset if a debit balance, and a current liability if a credit balance
  5. d) net, as income from construction if a credit balance, and loss from construction if a debit balance

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Under the percentage-of-completion method, how should earned but unbilled revenues on a long-term contract be disclosed on the statement of financial position?
  2. a) as construction in process in the current asset section
  3. b) as construction in process in the noncurrent asset section
  4. c) as a receivable in the noncurrent asset section
  5. d) in a note to the financial statements until the customer is formally billed for the portion of work completed

Answer: a

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. The principal disadvantage of using the percentage-of-completion method of recognizing revenue from long-term contracts is that it
  2. a) is unacceptable for income tax purposes.
  3. b) gives results based upon estimates which may be subject to considerable uncertainty.
  4. c) is likely to assign a small amount of revenue to a period during which a large amount of revenue was actually earned.
  5. d) no revenue is recognized during the contract.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. All of the following are disadvantages of input measures in measuring progress toward completion of long-term contracts EXCEPT
  2. a) inefficiencies may cause the productivity relationship to change.
  3. b) front-end loading.
  4. c) units are not comparable in time, effort, or cost to complete.
  5. d) the measures are not universally applicable.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. The principal disadvantage of output measures in measuring progress toward completion of long-term contracts is
  2. a) inefficiencies may cause the productivity relationship to change.
  3. b) front-end loading.
  4. c) units are not comparable in time, effort, or cost to complete.
  5. d) the measures are not universally applicable.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Under the completed-contract method,
  2. a) revenue, costs, and gross profit are recognized during the contract.
  3. b) revenue and costs are recognized during the contract, but gross profit recognition is deferred until the contract is completed.
  4. c) costs are recognized during the contract, but revenue and gross profit are not.
  5. d) revenue, costs and gross profit are not recognized until the contract is finished.

Answer: d

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Cost estimates on a long-term contract may indicate that a loss will result on completion of the entire contract. In this case, the entire expected loss should be
  2. a) recognized in the current period, regardless of whether the percentage-of-completion or completed-contract method is used.
  3. b) recognized in the current period under the percentage-of-completion method, but the completed-contract method should defer recognition of the loss to the time when the contract is completed.
  4. c) recognized in the current period under the completed-contract method, but the percentage-of-completion method should defer the loss until the contract is completed.
  5. d) deferred and recognized when the contract is completed, regardless of whether the percentage-of-completion or completed-contract method is used.

Answer: a

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Cost estimates at the end of the second year indicate a loss will result on completion of the entire contract. Which of the following statements is correct?
  2. a) Under the completed-contract method, the loss is not recognized until the year the construction is completed.
  3. b) Under the percentage-of-completion method, the gross profit recognized in the first year must not be changed.
  4. c) Under the completed-contract method, when the billings exceed the accumulated costs, the amount of the estimated loss is reported as a current liability.
  5. d) Under the completed-contract method, when the Construction in Process balance exceeds the billings, the estimated loss is added to the accumulated costs.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. The completed contract method for accounting for long-term construction projects requires that
  2. a) no revenue is recognized until the project is completed.
  3. b) costs are accumulated and revenue is recognized in proportion to cash collected.
  4. c) gross profit is calculated each period, but deferred until the end of the contract.
  5. d) revenue is calculated each period, but deferred until the end of the contract.

Answer: a

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Which of the following statements does NOT describe a long-term construction project that is accounted for under the completed-contract method?
  2. a) Revenues are recognized at the end of the contract.
  3. b) Revenues are recognized evenly throughout the contract.
  4. c) Gross profit is recognized at the end of the contract.
  5. d) Losses are recognized immediately.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Losses on unprofitable long-term construction projects
  2. a) are generally deferred until the contract is complete.
  3. b) are only recognized immediately under the completed-contract method.
  4. c) are only recognized immediately under the percentage-of-completion method.
  5. d) are recognized immediately under both the completed-contract method and the percentage-of-completion method.

Answer: d

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Losses in a current period on a profitable contract
  2. a) are generally deferred until the contract is complete.
  3. b) are only recognized immediately under the completed-contract method.
  4. c) are only recognized immediately under the percentage-of-completion method.
  5. d) are recognized immediately under both the completed-contract method and the percentage-of-completion method.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

  1. Which of the following statements regarding the completed contract method is NOT true?
  2. a) The company makes the same annual entries to record costs of construction, progress billings, and collections from customers as those under the percentage-of-completion method.
  3. b) The company makes the same entries to recognize revenue as those under the percentage-of-completion method.
  4. c) The company makes different entries to recognize revenue than under the percentage-of-completion method.
  5. d) Losses on an unprofitable contract are immediately recorded.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Multiple Choice—Computational

  1. On January 1, 2017, Reggae Ltd. sold land that cost $180,000 for $240,000, receiving a note bearing interest at 10 percent. The note will be paid in three annual instalments of $96,510 starting December 31, 2017. Assuming that collection of the note is very uncertain, how much revenue from this sale should Reggae recognize in 2017?
  2. a) $0
  3. b) $18,000
  4. c) $24,000
  5. d) $96,510

Answer: a

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $0

  1. R&B Inc. entered into a contract with Jingles Corporation, in which R&B agreed to provide Jingles with building supplies. Jingles agreed to pay a total of $18,000 at delivery. Under the contract-based view, R&B’s net contract position can be assumed to be
  2. a) $18,000.
  3. b) $9,000.
  4. c) $4,500.
  5. d) $0.

Answer: d

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $0

Use the following information for questions 63–64.

On April 1, Heavy Metal Corp. consigned 50 handcrafted benches to Disco Co. Heavy Metal’s cost was $350 per bench. Total freight costs were $700, which were paid by Disco. On August 1, Heavy Metal received a cheque for $14,100 from Disco which included the following information:

Number of units sold:………………………………………………. 20

Expenses deducted:

Freight:………………………………………………………… $700

Commission (20% of sales price)…………………………. ?

Advertising……………………………………………………. $450

Delivery………………………………………………………. $290

  1. Under the earnings approach, total sales were
  2. a) $15,540.
  3. b) $18,550.
  4. c) $19,060.
  5. d) $19,425.

Answer: d

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: 80% Sales – $700 – $450 – $290 = $14,100 (cheque received)

80% Sales = $15,540

Sales = $19,425

64 The inventory of benches will be reported on whose statement of financial position and at what amount?

  1. a) Heavy Metal’s statement of financial position, $10,500
  2. b) Heavy Metal’s statement of financial position, $10,920
  3. c) Disco’s statement of financial position $10,500
  4. d) Disco’s statement of financial position, $10,920

Answer: b

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: ($350 x 30) + ($700 x 30 ÷ 50) = $10,920

  1. Blues Construction Corp. has consistently used the percentage-of-completion method. During 2017, Blues entered into a fixed-price contract to construct an office building for $6,000,000. Information relating to the contract is as follows:

At December 31

2017 2018

Percentage of completion 15% 45%

Estimated total cost at completion $4,500,000 $4,800,000

Gross profit recognized (cumulative) 225,000 540,000

Under the earnings approach, contract costs incurred during 2015 were

  1. a) $1,440,000.
  2. b) $1,485,000.
  3. c) $1,575,000.
  4. d) $2,160,000.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Feedback: ($4,800,000 × 45%) – ($4,500,000 × 15%) = $1,485,000

Use the following information for questions 66–67.

A product and service are bundled together and sold to customers for $450. The fair values of the product and service are $350 and $150 respectively.

  1. Under the relative fair value method, how much would be allocated to the product?
  2. a) $150.00
  3. b) $388.89
  4. c) $350.00
  5. d) $300.00

Answer: b

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations.

Section Reference: Allocating the Transaction Price to Separate Performance Obligations—Step 4

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

  1. Under the residual method, how much would be allocated to the product?
  2. a) $350.00
  3. b) $388.89
  4. c) $300.00
  5. d) $150.00

Answer: c

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations.

Section Reference: Allocating the Transaction Price to Separate Performance Obligations—Step 4

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

  1. Punk Construction Corp. has consistently used the percentage-of-completion method. In 2017, Punk started work on a $7,000,000 construction contract that was completed in 2018. The following information was taken from Cymbal’s 2017 accounting records:

Billings to date…………………………………….. $2,200,000

Costs incurred…………………………………….. .. 2,100,000

Collections to date……………………………….. .. 1,400,000

Estimated costs to complete…………………. .. 4,200,000

Under the earnings approach, what amount of gross profit should Cymbal recognize in 2017 on this contract?

  1. a) $700,000
  2. b) $466,667
  3. c) $350,000
  4. d) $233,333

Answer: d

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $2,100,000

—————– × ($7,000,000 – $6,300,000) = $233,333

$6,300,000

Use the following information to answers questions 69–70.

During 2017, Indie Corp. started a construction job with a total contract price of $700,000. Indie has consistently used the completed contract method. The job was completed on December 15, 2017. Additional data are as follows:

2017 2018

Actual costs incurred…………………………………………….. $270,000 $305,000

Estimated remaining costs…………………………………….. 270,000 —

Billings to date……………………………………………………… 240,000 460,000

Collections to date………………………………………………… 200,000 480,000

  1. For 2017, what amount should Horn recognize as gross profit?
  2. a) $0
  3. b) $80,000
  4. c) $95,000
  5. d) $125,000

Answer: a

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $0

  1. For 2015, what amount should Horn recognize as gross profit?
  2. a) $0
  3. b) $80,000
  4. c) $95,000
  5. d) $125,000

Answer: d

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $700,000 – $270,000 – $305,000 = $125,000

  1. On June 1, Freedom Distributions (FD) shipped 100 TVs to Universal TV (UTV) on consignment. FD buys these TVs from their supplier for $600 each and sells them to UTV for $800. UTV then retails them for $1,200 each. By the end of June, Universal TV reported that they had sold 60 of these TVs, and remitted the appropriate amount to FD. How much revenue should be recorded by FD in connection with this transaction?
  2. a) $72,000
  3. b) $60,000
  4. c) $48,000
  5. d) $36,000

Answer: c

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Identify other revenue recognition issues.

Section Reference: Other Revenue Recognition Issues

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: 60 x $800 = $48,000

  1. Country Corp. contracted to construct a building for $1,500,000. Construction began in 2017 and was completed in 2018. Data relating to the contract follow:

Year ended

December 31,

2017 2018

Costs incurred……………………………………………………… $600,000 $460,000

Estimated costs to complete………………………………….. 400,000 —

Country uses the percentage-of-completion method. For the calendar years 2014 and 2015, respectively, Country should report gross profit of

  1. a) $270,000 and $170,000.
  2. b) $900,000 and $600,000.
  3. c) $300,000 and $140,000.
  4. d) $0 and $440,000.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $600,000

—————————— × ($1,500,000 – $1,000,000) = $300,000

$600,000 + $400,000

($1,500,000 – $1,060,000) – $300,000 = $140,000

  1. In 2017, Pop Construction Corp. began work on a contract for $3,700,000. Other details follow:

2017

Costs incurred during the year………………………………………………… $1,800,000

Estimated costs to complete as of December 31………………………. 1,200,000

Billings during the year…………………………………………………………… 1,650,000

Collections during the year……………………………………………………… 975,000

Pop uses the percentage-of-completion method. For calendar 2017, Pop should report gross profit of

  1. a) $150,000.
  2. b) $420,000.
  3. c) $700,000.
  4. d) $2,220,000.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $1,800,000

——————————–— × ($3,700,000 – $3,000,000) = $420,000

$1,800,000 + $1,200,000

Use the following information for questions 74–75.

In 2017, Hip-hop Inc. began a three year construction contract for $7,000,000. Hip-hop uses the percentage-of-completion method. The income to be recognized each year is based on the proportion of costs incurred to total estimated costs for completing the contract. The financial statement presentation relating to this contract for calendar 2017 follow:

Statement of Financial Position

Accounts receivable—construction contract billings………….. $300,000

Construction in progress………………………………………………… $850,000

Less contract billings……………………………………………………… 640,000

Costs and recognized profit in excess of billings……………….. 210,000

Income Statement

Income (before tax) on the contract recognized in 2014……. $210,000

  1. How much cash was collected in 2014 on this contract?
  2. a) $50,000
  3. b) $340,000
  4. c) $400,000
  5. d) $600,000

Answer: b

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $640,000 – $300,000 = $340,000

  1. What was the initial estimated gross profit on this contract?
  2. a) $762,860
  3. b) $810,462
  4. c) $1,300,408
  5. d) $1,729,412

Answer: d

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $850,000 – $210,000 = $640,000

$640,000

————————— × ($7,000,000 – Total estimated cost) = $210,000

Total estimated cost

Total estimated cost = $5,270,588

$7,000,000 – $5,270,588 = $1,729,412

  1. Rap Construction Corp. uses the percentage-of-completion method. In 2017, Rap began work on a contract for $1,650,000 which was completed in 2018. Data on the costs are:

Year Ended December 31

2017 2018

Costs incurred………………………………………………………………. $585,000 $420,000

Estimated costs to complete………………………………………….. 390,000 —

For the calendar years 2017 and 2018, Rap should recognize gross profit of

2017 2018

  1. a) $0 $645,000
  2. b) $387,000 $258,000
  3. c) $405,000 $240,000
  4. d) $405,000 $645,000

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $585,000

——–——- × ($1,650,000 – $975,000) = $405,000

$975,000

($1,650,000 – $1,005,000) – $405,000 = $240,000

Use the following information for questions 77–78.

Alternative Ltd. Began work in 2017 on a contract for $1,200,000. Other details follow:

2017 2018

Costs incurred during the year……………………………….. $200,000 $612,500

Estimated costs to complete as of December 31……… 600,000 0

Billings during the year………………………………………….. 225,000 900,000

Collections during the year…………………………………….. 150,000 975,000

  1. Assume that Alternative uses the percentage-of-completion method of accounting. The portion of the total gross profit to be recognized in 2017 is
  2. a) $75,000.
  3. b) $100,000.
  4. c) $300,000.
  5. d) $400,000.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $200,000

————— × ($1,200,000 – $800,000) = $100,000

$800,000

  1. Assume that Alternative uses the completed-contract method of accounting. The portion of the total gross profit to be recognized in 2018 is
  2. a) $150,000.
  3. b) $225,000.
  4. c) $387,500.
  5. d) $1,200,000.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $1,200,000 – $812,500 = $387,500

  1. Classical Ltd. Began work in 2017 on a contract for $1,250,000. Other data are:

2017 2018

Costs incurred to date…………………………………………… $540,000 $335,000

Estimated costs to complete as of December 31……… 360,000 —

Billings to date……………………………………………………… 420,000 1,250,000

Collections to date………………………………………………… 300,000 1,000,000

If Classical uses the percentage-of-completion method, the gross profit to be recognized in 2017 is

  1. a) $450,000.
  2. b) $210,000.
  3. c) $200,000.
  4. d) $100,000.

Answer: b

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $540,000

————— × ($1,250,000 – $900,000) = $210,000

$900,000

  1. A project was correctly accounted for under the percentage-of-completion method. At the end of the project, the Construction-in-Process account includes total debits and credits of $3,500,000. Assuming that total gross profit of $1,200,000 was recognized throughout the contract, total construction costs were
  2. a) $4,600,000.
  3. b) $3,500,000.
  4. c) $2,300,000.
  5. d) $2,100,000.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $3,500,000 – $1,200,000 = $2,300,000

81 At the end of year 2, the accounting records for a multi-year construction project indicate actual costs incurred to date of $3,200,000, and the most recent estimate of total costs of $9,500,000. Assuming the percentage-of completion method is used, to one decimal, at the end of year 2 the project is

  1. a) 33.7% complete.
  2. b) 31.2% complete.
  3. c) 26.1% complete.
  4. d) 25.2% complete.

Answer: a

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $3,200,000 ÷ $9,500,000 = 33.7%

  1. Classical Ltd. Began work in 2017 on a contract for $1,250,000. Other data are:

2017 2018

Costs incurred to date…………………………………………… $540,000 $335,000

Estimated costs to complete as of December 31……… 360,000 —

Billings to date……………………………………………………… 420,000 1,250,000

Collections to date………………………………………………… 300,000 1,000,000

If Classical uses the completed-contract method, the gross profit to be recognized in 2018 is

  1. a) $375,000.
  2. b) $400,000.
  3. c) $850,000.
  4. d) $1,000,000.

Answer: a

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $1,250,000 – $875,000 = $375,000

  1. Bluegrass Builders Ltd. Is using the completed-contract method for a $2,000,000 contract that will take two years to complete. Data at December 31, 2017, the end of the first year, are

Costs incurred to date…………………………………………… $ 925,000

Estimated costs to complete………………………………….. 1,100,000

Billings to date……………………………………………………… 850,000

Collections to date………………………………………………… 700,000

The gross profit or loss that should be recognized for 2017 is

  1. a) $50,000 gross profit.
  2. b) $25,000 gross profit.
  3. c) $25,000 loss.
  4. d) $0.

Answer: c

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $2,000,000 – ($925,000 + $1,100,000) = ($25,000) loss; must be recognized in current year.

Use the following information for questions 84–86.

Folk Construction Corp. began operations in 2017. Construction activity for 2017 is shown below. Folk uses the completed-contract method.

Billings Collections Estimated

Contract Through Through Costs to Costs to

Contract Price 12/31/17 12/31/17 12/31/17 Complete

1 $1,280,000 $1,260,000 $1,040,000 $860,000 —

2 1,440,000 600,000 400,000 328,000 $752,000

3 1,320,000 760,000 700,000 900,000 480,000

  1. Which of the following should be shown on the income statement for 2017 related to Contract 1?
  2. a) gross profit, $180,000
  3. b) gross profit, $240,000
  4. c) gross profit, $400,000
  5. d) gross profit, $420,000

Answer: d

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $1,280,000 – $860,000 = $420,000

  1. Which of the following should be shown on the statement of financial position at December 31, 2017 related to Contract 2?
  2. a) inventory, $272,000
  3. b) inventory, $328,000
  4. c) liability, $272,000
  5. d) liability, $600,000

Answer: c

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $600,000 – $328,000 = $272,000

  1. Which of the following should be shown on the statement of financial position at December 31, 2017 related to Contract 3?
  2. a) unbilled contract costs, $140,000
  3. b) unbilled contract costs, $60,000
  4. c) accounts receivable, $760,000
  5. d) construction in process, $480,000

Answer: a

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Feedback: $900,000 – $760,000 = $140,000

Exercises

Ex. 6-87 Constructive obligation

Picot Ltd. Sells goods with $200 with a standard return policy. The policy states customers may return goods within 30 days of purchase if defective. This policy is stated on the bill and contract; however, Picot advertises that it stands by its products 100%. In the past, they have been known to accept returns beyond the 30 day return policy. Sally made her purchase from Picot 45 days ago and now wishes to return it.

Instructions

Discuss whether Picot has an obligation to accept Sally’s return. Explain your answer.

Solution 6-87

Yes, Picot has an obligation to accept customer returns for any reason at any time because it has created an expectation. This is known as a constructive obligation.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-88 Economics of a transaction

The following are independent situations that require professional judgement for determining when to recognize revenue from the transactions.

  1. Volkswagen sells all its vehicles with the promise that any service required in the first year of ownership will be free of charge.
  2. Walmart sells you a new wardrobe online. The wardrobe is shipped and arrives in November, and you charge it to your Walmart credit card. In December, you receive your Walmart credit card statement and pay the amount due.
  3. Norwegian Cruise lines sells you a 10-day Mediterranean cruise. The cost includes your transportation (of course), room and board, and meals and entertainment on the ship. Shore excursions are an additional cost.
  4. You go back to Walmart and buy some hangers and socks to go in your new wardrobe. You pay with cash.
  5. Students pre-register for online classes at Royal Roads University year round, one month in advance of their course start-date.
  6. In February, Splashes sells dishwashers with 3 year extended warranties. The dishwashers are delivered in April, and payment is due upon delivery. Warranty plans are normally sold separately.

Instructions

For each scenario, identify what is being “sold”: goods, services, or a combination.

Solution 6-88

  1. The car is a goods, while the promised service is a service.

  1. The wardrobe is a good. By using Walmart’s credit card, you have also used their credit-lending services.

  1. The room is a good (though if cleaned, part of the room is a service). The food is part good/part service. Entertainment is a service. Transportation is a service.

  1. Good

  1. Service

  1. Combination

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-89 Concessionary terms

Explain what concessionary terms are, and give four examples.

Solution 6-89

Concessionary terms are terms that are more favourable than normal. This is often seen when supply exceeds demand, and the buyer can negotiate a better deal than usual.

Examples include:

  1. Deep discounts on selling price
  2. Looser credit policy (e.g. giving the customer a longer period to pay)
  3. Extended trial periods, with the sale subject to customer acceptance after the trial period
  4. Seller provides ongoing or additional services that are beyond normal practice
  5. Extended warranties or free warranties
  6. More lenient (looser) return policies than normal

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Ex. 6-90 Definitions

Provide clear, concise answers for the following:

  1. Explain the conceptual difference between the earnings approach and the contract-based approach to accounting for revenues.
  2. How is revenue recognized under the earnings approach?
  3. How is revenue recognized under the contract-based approach?
  4. How are sales accounted for in the presence of collection and measurement uncertainty?
  5. What are the two main methods to account for long-term construction projects allowed under ASPE?
  6. Why is it important to understand the business perspective of selling transactions?
  7. Explain the term onerous contracts and its implications.

Solution 6-90
  1. The earnings approach focuses on the earnings process itself and how value is added. The contract-based approach focuses on the creation of contractual rights and obligations that are created by sales contracts.

  1. Under the earnings approach, revenue is recognized when performance is substantially complete, the transaction can be measured, and collection is reasonably assured.

  1. Under the contract-based approach, the net contract position is initially recognized (through assets and corresponding liabilities) when the contract has been entered into. Revenue is subsequently recognized as the contract obligations are fulfilled.

  1. In the absence of reasonable expectation of collection and/or ability to measure the related revenue, sales should not be booked.

  1. The two main methods allowed under ASPE are the percentage-of-completion and the completed-contract methods.

  1. The business perspective includes the physical and reciprocal nature as well as any concessionary terms of the transaction. This may impact the timing, measurement and recognition of those sales.

  1. Onerous contracts are contracts that are no longer profitable to the company. These contracts should be re-measured and a loss should be recognized.

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

Learning Objective: Identify the five steps in the revenue recognition process.

Section Reference: Five-Step Revenue Recognition Process—Example

Learning Objective: Identify the contract with customers.

Section Reference: Identifying the Contract with Customers—Step 1

Learning Objective: Identify the separate performance obligations in the contract.

Section Reference: Identifying Separate Performance Obligations—Step 2

Learning Objective: Understand how to recognize revenue when the company satisfies its performance obligation.

Section Reference: Recognizing Revenue When (or as) Each Performance Obligation Is Satisfied—Step 5

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

Learning Objective: Identify other revenue recognition issues.

Section Reference: Other Revenue Recognition Issues

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Ex. 6-91 Terminology

In the space provided at right, write the word or phrase that is defined or indicated.

  1. A contract that is no longer ______

profitable to the company.

  1. An entity may have an implicit obligation ______

even if it is not explicitly noted

in the sales contract.

  1. Sales that are comprised of ______

several individual components.

  1. The party acting as an agent for ______

the seller.

  1. The method to allocate sales prices ______

to individual components of a sales

bundle where the fair value of the

undelivered item is subtracted from

the overall purchase price.

  1. The method used to account for ______

long-term contracts that do not

recognize profits before the completion

of the project.

  1. The account used in the percentage-of ______

completion and completed-contract

methods to accumulate costs and

recognize profits.

  1. Cash or other assets an entity ______

receives in return for the provision

of goods or services.

  1. The actions a company takes to ______

add value.

Solution 6-91
  1. onerous

  1. constructive obligation

  1. bundled sales

  1. consignee

  1. residual value method

  1. completed-contract method

  1. construction in process account

  1. consideration

  1. earnings process

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Understand the economics and legalities of selling transactions from a business perspective.

Section Reference: Understanding the Nature of Sales Transactions from a Business Perspective

Learning Objective: Identify the five steps in the revenue recognition process.

Section Reference: Five-Step Revenue Recognition Process—Example

Learning Objective: Identify the contract with customers.

Section Reference: Identifying the Contract with Customers—Step 1

Learning Objective: Identify the separate performance obligations in the contract.

Section Reference: Identifying Separate Performance Obligations—Step 2

Learning Objective: Understand how to recognize revenue when the company satisfies its performance obligation.

Section Reference: Recognizing Revenue When (or as) Each Performance Obligation Is Satisfied—Step 5

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

Learning Objective: Identify other revenue recognition issues.

Section Reference: Other Revenue Recognition Issues

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

Learning Objective: Apply the completed-contract method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Completed-Contract Method (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Ex. 6-92 Revenue recognition process

Assume that Bombardier Inc. signs a contract to sell light-rail-transit (LRT) vehicles to the Region of Waterloo for $15 million.

Instructions

Using this transaction as an example, illustrate the five steps in the revenue recognition process for Bombardier.

Solution 6-92

  1. A contract is an agreement between two parties that creates enforceable rights or obligations. In this case, Bombardier has signed a contract to deliver LRT vehicles to Waterloo.

  1. Bombardier has only one performance obligation: to deliver LRT vehicles to Waterloo.

  1. Transaction price is the amount of consideration that a company expects to receive from a customer in exchange for transferring a good or service. In this case, the transaction price is straightforward. It is $15 million.

  1. In this case, Bombardier has only one performance obligation, to deliver LRT vehicles to the Region of Waterloo.

  1. Bombardier recognizes revenue of $15 million for the sale of LRT vehicle when it satisfies its performance obligation, the delivery of the LRT vehicles to the Region of Waterloo.

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Identify the five steps in the revenue recognition process.

Section Reference: Five-Step Revenue Recognition Process—Example

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-93 Revenue recognition process

How would your answer to Exercise 6-92 change if Bombardier had also contracted to maintain the LRT vehicles for the Region of Waterloo?

Solution 6-93

  1. Bombarder may have signed two contracts, or the maintenance could be included in the initial contract. Either way they should acknowledge that one deliverable is relatively punctuated and the other is long-term.

  1. A separate performance obligation is recorded for the promise to maintain the cars in whatever magnitude of cost the expected maintenance is anticipated to create.

  1. The transaction price would need to be estimated unless, for example, a flat annual rate were set out in the original contract.

  1. In this case, Bombardier has two performance obligations – to deliver LRT vehicles and to maintain them.

  1. Bombardier recognizes revenue of $15 million for the sale of LRT vehicle when it satisfies its performance obligation, the delivery of the LRT vehicles to the Region of Waterloo. Cost relating to the service portion of the contract would be recognizes as service is provided, or with the passage of time, depending on the terms of the contract.

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Identify the five steps in the revenue recognition process.

Section Reference: Five-Step Revenue Recognition Process—Example

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-94 Contract identification

Coffee Co. enters into a contract to delivery coffee to the House of Commons on July 1, 2017. The House agrees to pay the full price of $3,000 on August 1, 207. The cost of goods is $1,400. Coffee Co. delivers the coffee to the House on July 1, 2017 and receives payment on August 1, 2017.

Instructions

Prepare the journal entries for Coffee Co. related to this contract.

Solution 6-94

On July 1, 2017, Coffee Co. delivers and therefore should recognize the revenue on that date because it satisfies the performance obligation by delivering the coffee to the House. There is now an unconditional right to receive the payment (and therefore an accounts receivable)

The journal entry to record the sale and related cost of goods sold is as follows:

July 1, 2017

Accounts Receivable………………………………………………….. 3,000

Sales Revenue…………………………………………………….. 3,000

Costs of Goods Sold…………………………………………………… 1,400

Inventory…………………………………………………………….. 1,400

After receiving payment on August 1, 2017, Coffee Co makes the following entry:

August 1, 2017

Cash…………………………………………………………………………. 3,000

Accounts Receivable……………………………………………. 3,000

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Identify the contract with customers.

Section Reference: Identifying the Contract with Customers—Step 1

Learning Objective: Describe presentation and disclosure regarding revenue.

Section Reference: Presentation and Disclosure

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex 6-95 Contract identification

Tiger Ltd. has an ongoing contract with to deliver 700 stripes to Orange Inc. over a seven-month period for $7,000. After 400 stripes have been delivered, Tiger modifies the contract by promising to delivery 140 more stripes for $1,120, or $8 per stripe (which is the stand-alone selling price of stripes at the time of contract modification). Tiger regularly sells stripes separately.

Instructions

Will the additional promise be considered part of the original contract? Explain.

Solution 6-95

In this situation, the contract modification for the additional 140 stripes is, in effect, a new and separate contract because it meets both of the conditions:

  1. The promised goods or services are distinct

  1. The price increased by an amount of consideration that reflects the stand-alone selling price of the promised goods or services (in this case, the stripes).

It does not affect the accounting for the original service.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Identify the contract with customers.

Section Reference: Identifying the Contract with Customers—Step 1

Learning Objective: Describe presentation and disclosure regarding revenue.

Section Reference: Presentation and Disclosure

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-96 Performance obligations

Trikonasana Inc. enters into a contract to design and build a bridge connecting a busy downtown core to a shoreline across the way that is home to many commuters. Trikonasana is responsible for overall management of the project and identifies various goods and services to be provided, including engineering, site clearance, foundation, procurement, construction of the structure, and so on.

Instructions

Under IFRS, does Trikonasana have a single performance obligation to the city in this revenue arrangement?

Solution 6-96

The overall management of the bridge construction project and the construction itself are interdependent, and therefore should be accounted for as one performance obligation.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Identify the separate performance obligations in the contract.

Section Reference: Identifying Separate Performance Obligations—Step 2

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-97 Performance obligations

Island Foods Inc. has a promotional program whereby for every $10 spent in store, customers receive stamps which can later be redeemed for knives and cookware.

Instructions

Under IFRS does Island Foods have a single performance obligation to its customers in this revenue arrangement?

Solution 6-97

For the items customers buy in store, Island Foods has fulfilled its performance obliation (maybe less any allowance they might estimate based on past returns). The rights associated with the stamps are essentially giving the customer future items for free and should be treated as separate performance obligations as they provide the customer with a right they would otherwise not be entitled to (i.e., Without the stamps they would need to pay for such knives and cookware). A portion of the customer’s bill is hence advance payment for future goods and services, and the transaction price must be allocated accordingly, between the two separate performance obligations.

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Identify the separate performance obligations in the contract.

Section Reference: Identifying Separate Performance Obligations—Step 2

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-98 Sales with discounts

Green Company sells goods to Thumb Inc. on account on January 1, 2017. The goods have a sales price of $312,000 (cost $164,000). The terms of sale are net 30. If Thumb pays within 5 days, it receives a cash discount of $12,000. Past history indicates that the cash discount will be taken.

Instructions

  1. a) Prepare the journal entries for Green for January 1, 2017.
  2. b) Prepare the journal entries for Green for January 31, 2017, assuming Thumb does not make payment until January 31, 2017.

Solution 6-98

  1. a) January 1, 2017

Accounts Receivable……………………………………………. 300,000

Sales Revenue………………………………………………. 300,000

Cost of goods sold………………………………………………… 164,000

Inventory………………………………………………………. 164,000

  1. b) January 31, 2017

Cash…………………………………………………………………… 312,000

Accounts Receivable……………………………………… 300,000

Sales Discounts Forfeited……………………………….. 12,000

Sales discounts forfeited is reported in the “Other revenue and gains” section of the income statement.

It was assumed the discount would be taken because historical experience suggested as such.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Determine the transaction price.

Section Reference: Determining the Transaction Price—Step 3

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-99 Transaction price

Presented below are three revenue recognition situations:

  1. a) Bliss sells goods to Jusu for $10,000 payment due at delivery.
  2. b) Bliss sells goods on account to Saanich for $23,000 payment due in 30 days.
  3. c) Bliss sells goods to Nourish for $50,000 due in two instalments: the first instalment payable in 20 months, and the second payment due 4 months later. The present value of the future payments is $47,000.

Instructions

Indicate the transaction price for each of these transactions and when revenue will be recognized.

Solution 6-99

  1. a) $10,000 recognized at time of delivery.

  1. b) $23,000 recognized at time of delivery, less any allowance to account for estimated bad debts.

  1. c) $47,000 recognized at the time of delivery/ sale. The $3,000 imputed interest income will be recognized with the passage of time at the imputed rate, which discounts the payments ($50K) to the current value of $47K.

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Determine the transaction price.

Section Reference: Determining the Transaction Price—Step 3

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Exercise 6-100 Allocate transaction price

Periwinkle Company manufactures equipment. Periwinkle’s products range form simple automated machinery to complex systems containing numerous components. Unit selling pices range from $140,000 to $1,200,000 and are quoted inclusive of installation. The installation process does NOT involve changes to the features of the equipment to perform specifications. Periwinkle has the following relationship with Rose Inc.

  • Rose can purchase equipment from Periwinkle for a price of $200,000 and contracts with Periwinkle to install the equipment. Using market data, Rose determines installation service is estimated to have a fair value of $20,000. The cost of the equipment is $78,000.
  • Rose is obligated to pay Periwinkle the $200,000 upon delivery and installation of the equipment.

Periwinkle delivers the equipment on August 1, 2017, and completes the installation of the equipment on October 1, 2017. The equipment has a useful life of 7 years. Assume the equipment and the installations are two distinct performance obligations that should be accounted for separately.

Instructions

  1. a) How should the transaction price of $200,000 be allocated among the service obligations?
  2. b) Prepare the journal entries for Periwinkle for this revenue arrangement for 2017, assuming Periwinkle receives payment when installation is completed.

Solution 6-100

  1. a) Having been provided the market value of the installation, the residual approach is used here, and allocation is as follows:

$20,000 Installation

$180,000 Equipment

  1. b) Journal Entries

August 1, 2017: Equipment Delivery

Accounts Receivable……………………………………………. 180,000

Sales Revenue………………………………………………. 180,000

Cost of Equipment Sold………………………………………… 78,000

Equipment Inventory………………………………………. 78,000

October 1, 2017: Equipment Installation

Cash…………………………………………………………………… 200,000

Installation Revenue……………………………………….. 20,000

Accounts Receivable……………………………………… 180,000

If there was a cost of labour associated with installation, we would record that here, too; however, this information was not provided in the question.

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations.

Section Reference: Allocating the Transaction Price to Separate Performance Obligations—Step 4

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-101 Discounted transaction price

Gabby Inc., is selling tickets to a conference. In addition, Gabby offers an online course. Online courses are often sold separately at a rate of $259 per course.

Item Stand-alone Selling Price Price when Bundled

Conference $60

Course $249

Both $185

Total $309 $185

Instructions

How should the discount be allocated to the elements of the revenue arrangement?

Solution 6-101

In this case, the discount applies to the performance obligations related to providing the course. As a result, Gabby allocates the discount solely to the course, as follows:

Allocated Amounts

Courses………………………………………………………………. $125

Conference…………………………………………………………. 60

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations.

Section Reference: Allocating the Transaction Price to Separate Performance Obligations—Step 4

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-102 Bundled sales

Canucks Inc., a software company sells new accounting software and user support bundled together. The fair value of the software is $1,500 and the fair value of the user support is $500. The user support is valid for a period of 12 months from the date of software purchase. To be able to compete with a competitor’s offering, Loon decided to sell the bundle at a discount for $1,800.

During its first month of sales, 100 units of this software bundle were sold at the discounted price, and expenses were $50,000.

Instructions

  1. a) Calculate the sale price that should be allocated to each component of the bundle using the adjusted market assessment approach.
  2. b) Calculate the sale price that should be allocated to each component of the bundle using the residual approach.
  3. c) Assuming that the relative fair value method is used and income tax rate is 30%, calculate the net income applicable to Loon’s first month of sales.

Solution 6-102

  1. a) Adjusted Market Assessment Approach:

Software: $1,500 x [$1,800 / ($1,500 + $500)] =…………….. $1,350

User Support: $500 x [$1,800 / ($1,500 + $500)] =…………. 450

$1,800

  1. b) Residual approach:

Software: $1,800 – $500……………………………………………… $1,300

User Support: $1,800 – $1,300…………………………………….. 500

$1,800

  1. c) Net income calculation:

Sales ($1,800 x 100)…………………………………………………… $180,000

Less: Expenses………………………………………………………….. (50,000)

User Support Unearned Portion……………………………………. (41,250)

[($450 x 100) x 11÷12]

Income before tax………………………………………………………. 88,750

Less income tax (30%)……………………………………………….. (26,625)

Net Income………………………………………………………………… $ 62,125

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations.

Section Reference: Allocating the Transaction Price to Separate Performance Obligations—Step 4

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-103 Contract-based approach

In January 2017, Bruins Construction Corp. contracted to construct a building for $6,000,000. Construction started in early 2017 and was completed in 2018. The following additional information is available:

2017 2018

Costs incurred……………………………………………… $2,430,000 $2,700,000

Estimated costs to complete…………………………. .. 2,600,000 —

Collections during the year……………………………. .. 2,400,000 3,600,000

Bruins uses the percentage-of-completion method.

Instructions

Under the contract-based approach,

  1. a) How much revenue should Bruins report for 2017 and 2018?
  2. b) Prepare all journal entries for 2017 and 2018 for this contract.

Solution 6-103

a)

2017: [$2,430,000 ÷ ($2,430,000 + $2,600,000)] x $6,000,000 = $2,898,608

2018: [($2,430,000 + $2,700,000) ÷ ($2,430,000 + 2,700,000 + $0) x $6,000,000] – $2,898,608 = $3,101,392

b)

2017:

Contract asset…………………………………………………………………………….. 6,000,000

Contract liability…………………………………………………………………….. 6,000,000

To record contract rights and obligations—January 2017

Contract liability…………………………………………………………………………… 2,430,000

Materials, Cash, Payables etc………………………………………………… 2,430,000

To record construction cost—2017

Cash………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2,400,000

Contract asset………………………………………………………………………. 2,400,000

To record collections—2017

Construction expenses…………………………………………………………………. 2,430,000

Contract liability…………………………………………………………………….. 2,430,000

To recognize revenue and gross profit—2017

Contract asset…………………………………………………………………………….. 2,898,608

Revenue from long-term contract…………………………………………… 2,898,608

2018:

Contract liability…………………………………………………………………………… 2,700,000

Materials, Cash, Payables etc………………………………………………… 2,700,000

To record construction cost—2018

Cash………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3,600,000

Contract asset………………………………………………………………………. 3,600,000

To record collections—2018

Construction expenses…………………………………………………………………. 2,700,000

Contract liability…………………………………………………………………….. 2,700,000

To recognize revenue and gross profit—2018

Contract asset…………………………………………………………………………….. 3,101,392

Revenue from long-term contract…………………………………………… 3,101,392

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations.

Section Reference: Allocating the Transaction Price to Separate Performance Obligations—Step 4

Learning Objective: Understand how to recognize revenue when the company satisfies its performance obligation.

Section Reference: Recognizing Revenue When (or as) Each Performance Obligation Is Satisfied—Step 5

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-104 Timing of revenue recognition

Asana Inc. enters into a contract with Modo Company to develop and install a customized enterprise resource planning system (ERP). Progress payments are made upon completion of each stage of the contract. If the contract is terminated, the partly completely ERP will pass to Modo Company. Asana is prohibited from directing the software to another customer (and besides, it is likely too customized to do so, anyway). Asana Inc. prepares its financial statements in accordance with IFRS.

Instructions

At what point should Asana recognize revenue related to its contract with Modo Company?

Solution 6-104

Asana creates an asset with no alternative use because it is prohibited from redirecting the software. In addition, Asana is entitled to payments for performance to date and expects to complete the project. Therefore, Asana concludes that the contract meets the criteria for recognition of revenue over time.

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Understand how to recognize revenue when the company satisfies its performance obligation.

Section Reference: Recognizing Revenue When (or as) Each Performance Obligation Is Satisfied—Step 5

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-105 Timing of revenue recognition/percentage of completion

Crush Inc. provides demolition services. In order to determine the progression of its projects, the company could use several measures, including estimated labour hours, total machine hours, and output of material demolished. A project Crush currently has underway has taken 400 labour hours, 900 machine hours, and 2,000 tons of material output. The estimated total resources required (and resulting outputs) for this project are 1,000 labour hours, 1,400 machine hours and 4,500 tons of materials.

Instructions

Consider the three alternative means of tracking percentage completion. Under each method, calculate the percentage-completion rate for this project.

Solution 6-105

  1. a) Labour Hours

400 hours / 1,000 hours = 40% complete

  1. b) Machine Hours

900 hours / 1,400 hours = 64% complete

  1. c) Material Output

2,000 tons / 4,500 tons = 45% complete

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Understand how to recognize revenue when the company satisfies its performance obligation.

Section Reference: Recognizing Revenue When (or as) Each Performance Obligation Is Satisfied—Step 5

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-106 Percentage-of-completion method

Jets Ltd. contracted to build a high-rise for $6,000,000. Construction began in 2017 and is expected to be completed in 2020. Data for 2017 and 2018 are:

2017 2018

Costs incurred……………………………………………………… $ 900,000 $1,700,000

Estimated costs to complete………………………………….. 3,600,000 2,400,000

Instructions

Using the percentage-of-completion method and the cost-to-cost basis,

  1. a) How much gross profit should be reported for 2017? Show your calculation.
  2. b) How much gross profit should be reported for 2018? Show your calculation.
  3. c) Prepare the journal entry to record the revenue and gross profit for 2018.

Solution 6-106
  1. a) $900,000

————–— × ($6,000,000 – $4,500,000) = $300,000

$4,500,000

  1. b) $2,700,000

————––— × ($6,000,000 – $5,000,000) = $520,000

$5,000,000

Less 2017 gross profit (300,000)

Gross profit in 2018 $220,000

  1. c) Construction in Process (gross profit)………………………………………. 220,000

Construction Expenses………………………………………………………….. 1,700,000

Revenue from Long-term Contracts…………………………………. 1,920,000

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Understand how to recognize revenue when the company satisfies its performance obligation.

Section Reference: Recognizing Revenue When (or as) Each Performance Obligation Is Satisfied—Step 5

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-107 Risks & rewards of ownership

Describe the factors one must consider in determining who has the risk and rewards of ownership and, therefore, whether a sale has occurred at the point of delivery, under the earnings approach.

Solution 6-107

  1. Who has possession of the goods?
  2. Who has legal title?
  3. Who is exposed to risk of loss?
  4. Who recognizes the related goods or services as an asset?

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-108 Earnings approach to revenue recognition

Fabathletics sends an outfit to monthly subscribers each month. If the customer does NOT want the outfit in a given month they can send it back before the last day of that month free of charge in exchange for a store credit. Fab prepares its financial statements in accordance with ASPE.

Instructions

Describe when these transactions should be recognized as sales under the earnings approach.

Solution 6-108

The shipment of the goods signifies Fab has completed their performance obligation in relation to the sale only if the customer chooses not to return the item. Thus, after the final day of the month revenues can be recognized. The balance related to any returned goods is considered unearned revenue until the customers redeem it for credits. If Fab has sufficient sales history to estimate the amount of returns it may recognize a proportion of revenue commensurate with past experience.

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

Learning Objective: Identify other revenue recognition issues.

Section Reference: Other Revenue Recognition Issues

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-109 Percentage-of-completion method

Oilers Construction was awarded a contract to construct an interchange at the junction of two major freeways in a Canadian city at a total contract price of $10,000,000. The estimated total costs to complete the project were $8,000,000, and it is expected to take two years.

Instructions

Using the percentage-of-completion method and the cost-to-cost basis,

  1. a) Prepare the journal entry to record construction costs of $4,400,000 for the first year.
  2. b) Prepare the journal entry to record progress billings of $5,000,000 for the first year.
  3. c) Prepare the journal entry to recognize the revenue and gross profit for the first year.

Solution 6-109

% complete = 4,400,000 ÷ 8,000,000 = 55%

  1. a) Construction in Process…………………………………………………………. 4,400,000

Materials, Cash, A/P, etc…………………………………………………. 4,400,000

  1. b) Accounts Receivable…………………………………………………………….. 5,000,000

Billings on Construction in Process……………………………………. 5,000,000

  1. c) Construction Expenses………………………………………………………….. 4,400,000

Construction in Process (gross profit)………………………………………. 1,100,000

Revenue from Long-term Contract (55% x $10,000,000)……. 5,500,000

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Analyze and determine whether a company has earned revenues under the earnings approach.

Section Reference: Earnings Approach

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex 6-110 Performance obligations and warranties

Kimbo Corporation sold 500 widgets during 2017 at a total price of $1.4 million, with a warranty guarantee that the widgets were free from any defects. The cost of widgets sold is $600,000. The term of the assurance warranty is one year, with an estimated cost of $10,000.

Instructions

What are the journal entries that Kimbo Company should make in 2017 related to the sale and the related warranties?

Solution 6-110

To record the revenue and liabilities related to the warranties:

Cash…………………………………………………………………… 1,400,000

Warranty Liability…………………………………………… 10,000

Warranty expenses would be recorded as incurred and the liability reduced accordingly

To reduce inventory and recognize cost of goods sold:

Cost of goods sold………………………………………………… 600,000

Inventory………………………………………………………. 600,000

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Identify other revenue recognition issues.

Section Reference: Other Revenue Recognition Issues

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Exercise 6-111 Revenue recognition

Alpine sells forklifts to Cusco Ltd. Cusco places an order for 50 forklifts to take advantage of a volume discount. Cusco does NOT have storage space to store the forklifts; therefore, they request that Alpine store the forklifts and provide them a delivery schedule. Cusco provides Alpine with insurance coverage for the forklifts and acknowledges that they are taking title to the forklifts immediately. Alpine stores the forklifts in a separate part of the warehouse and specifically identifies them as belonging to Cusco. Alpine invoices Cusco once the paperwork is complete and requires payment within the customary 30-day term.

Instructions

Explain when Alpine can recognize the revenue related to sale of forklifts to Cusco and why.

Solution 6-111

The transaction between Cusco and Alpine meets the criteria for a bill-and-hold sale, and can therefore be recognized as revenue at the time of invoicing. These criteria are:

  1. Probability that delivery will be made
  2. Item is on hand, identified, and ready for delivery to the buyer
  3. The buyer specifically recognizes the deferred delivery instructions
  4. The usual payment terms apply.

Alpine has transferred control to Cusco; that is, Alpine has the right to payment for the forklifts and legal title has transferred.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Identify other revenue recognition issues.

Section Reference: Other Revenue Recognition Issues

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-112 Consignment sale

In 2017, the following transaction occurred between Senators Wholesale Corp. (consignor) and Canadiens Stores (consignee):

On March 2, 2017 Senators shipped merchandise costing $52,000 to Canadiens. Senators paid $4,000 for freight and Canadiens paid $3,000 for advertising (to be reimbursed by Senators). By the end of the third quarter of 2017 (September 30, 2017), Canadiens advised Senators that all the merchandise has been sold for $70,000, and forwarded the proceeds (net of a 15% commission and the outlay for advertising) to Senators.

Instructions

  1. a) Prepare all entries for Canadiens to account for this transaction.
  2. b) Prepare all entries for Senators to account for this transaction.

Solution 6-112

  1. a) Canadiens

Receivable from Consignor………………………………………………………….. 3,000

Cash……………………………………………………………………………………. 3,000

To set up receivable for advertising

Cash………………………………………………………………………………………….. 70,000

Payable to Consignor…………………………………………………………….. 70,000

To record sale

Payable to Consignor…………………………………………………………………… 70,000

Receivable from Consignor……………………………………………………. 3,000

Commission Revenue*………………………………………………………….. 10,500

*$70,000 x 15% = $10,500

Cash……………………………………………………………………………………. 56,500

To record Remittance to consignor

  1. b) Senators

Inventory on Consignment……………………………………………………………. 52,000

Merchandise Inventory………………………………………………………….. 52,000

To record Shipment of consigned merchandise

Inventory on Consignment……………………………………………………………. 4,000

Cash……………………………………………………………………………………. 4,000

To record Payment of freight costs

Cash………………………………………………………………………………………….. 56,500

Advertising Expense……………………………………………………………………. 3,000

Commission Expense………………………………………………………………….. 10,500

Revenue from Consignment Sales………………………………………….. 70,000

To record Remittance from consignee

Cost of Goods Sold (52,000 + 4,000)…………………………………………….. 56,000

Inventory on Consignment……………………………………………………… 56,000

To record Cost of sales for consignment sales

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Identify other revenue recognition issues.

Section Reference: Other Revenue Recognition Issues

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-113 Reporting of gross or net revenues

Discuss three factors to consider in determining whether gross or net revenues should be reported on the income statement.

Solution 6-113

Factors to consider:

  1. Is the company acting as principal or are they acting as agent or broker? If as principal, this would support reporting gross revenue; if as agent/broker, this would support reporting net revenue.
  2. Is the company taking title to the goods being sold? Taking title supports reporting gross revenue.
  3. Who has the risks and rewards of ownership of the goods being sold? Having the risks and rewards supports reporting gross revenue.

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Identify other revenue recognition issues.

Section Reference: Other Revenue Recognition Issues

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-114 Presentation & the percentage-of-completion method

Thuxton Inc. began work on a $6,000,000 non-cancellable contract in 2017 to construct a retail building. During 2017, Thuxton incurred costs of $1,500,000 and billed its customers for $1,400,000 (non-refundable), and collected $1,000,000. At December 31, 2017, the estimated future costs to complete the project total $2,500,000.

Instructions

Prepare Thuxton’s 2017 journal entries using the percentage-of-completion method.

Solution 6-114

To record the cost of construction:

Contract asset/liability…………………………………………………. 1,500,000

Materials, Payables, Cash etc……………………………….. 1,500,000

To record progress billings:

Accounts receivable……………………………………………………. 1,400,000

Contract asset/liability…………………………………………… 1,400,000

The debit represents an unconditional right to receive consideration because the billings are non-refundable and the contract non-cancellable.

To record collections:

Cash…………………………………………………………………………. 1,000,000

Accounts receivable……………………………………………… 1,000,000

To record revenues

Contract asset/liability…………………………………………………. 2,571,429

Revenue from long-term contracts…………………………. 2,571,429

To record construction expenses:

Construction expenses………………………………………………… 1,500,000

Contract asset/liability…………………………………………… 1,500,000

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Describe presentation and disclosure regarding revenue.

Section Reference: Presentation and Disclosure

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

Ex. 6-115 Percentage-of-completion method

Flames Corp. contracted to build a bridge for $5,000,000. Construction began in 2017 and was completed in 2018. Data relating to the construction are:

2017 2018

Costs incurred……………………………………………… $1,620,000 $1,400,000

Estimated costs to complete…………………………. .. 1,380,000 —

Instructions

Using the percentage-of-completion method and the cost-to-cost basis,

  1. a) How much revenue should be reported for 2017? Show your calculation.
  2. b) Prepare the journal entry to record progress billings of $1,700,000 during 2017.
  3. c) Prepare the journal entry to record the revenue and gross profit for 2017.
  4. d) How much gross profit should be reported for 2018? Show your calculation.

Solution 6-115
  1. a) $1,620,000

————–— × $5,000,000 = $2,700,000

$3,000,000

  1. b) Accounts Receivable…………………………………………………………….. 1,700,000

Billings on Construction in Process……………………………………. 1,700,000

  1. c) Construction Expenses………………………………………………………….. 1,620,000

Construction in Process…………………………………………………………. 1,080,000

Revenue from Long-term Contracts…………………………………. 2,700,000

  1. d) Revenue………………………………………………………………………………. $5,000,000

Less actual costs…………………………………………………………………… (3,020,000)

Total gross profit……………………………………………………………………. 1,980,000

Recognized in 2017……………………………………………………………….. (1,080,000)

Recognized in 2018……………………………………………………………….. $ 900,000

OR

Total revenue……………………………………………………………………….. $5,000,000

Recognized in 2017……………………………………………………………….. (2,700,000)

Recognized in 2018……………………………………………………………….. 2,300,000

Actual costs in 2018………………………………………………………………. (1,400,000)

Gross profit in 2018……………………………………………………………….. $ 900,000

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Apply the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts.

Section Reference: Long-Term Contracts (Appendix 6A)

CPA: Communication

CPA: Financial Reporting

Bloomcode: Knowledge

Bloomcode: Application

PROBLEMS

Pr. 6-116 Long-term contract

On January 1, 2017, Charger Corp., a management consulting firm, entered into a contract with Viking Company to provide advisory services over a four-year period. The contract price was $4,000,000 and was to be paid in four equal annual payments at the end of each year. Charger’s expenses relating to this contract were $650,000, $730,000, $780,000 and $710,000 for 2017–2020. Collectibility was reasonably assured throughout the duration of the contract and measurement uncertainties were NOT an issue.

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