Moral Issues in Business 12th Edition by William H. Shaw -Test Bank =A

$35.00
Moral Issues in Business 12th Edition by William H. Shaw -Test Bank =A

Moral Issues in Business 12th Edition by William H. Shaw -Test Bank =A

$35.00
Moral Issues in Business 12th Edition by William H. Shaw -Test Bank =A
  1. The case of MacPherson v. Buick Motor Car in 1916 changed product liability law. As a result of it, the courts
a.permitted consumers to sue manufacturers with whom they had no contractual relationships.
b.adopted the principle of caveat emptor.
c.permitted consumers to sue the retailer from whom they had purchased the product.
d.adopted the principle of strict liability.

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 262

  1. According to the legal doctrine of strict product liability,
a.the producer of a product is responsible for any injury the consumer suffers.
b.consumers must assume all risk whenever they buy a product.
c.product liability presupposes negligence by more than one party.
d.a manufacturer need not be negligent to be held liable for a defective product.

ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: p. 263

  1. Which statement is accurate in its description of consumer protection?
a.The Consumer Product Safety Commission has the power to order recalls.
b.Statistics show that, in fact, safety regulations rarely succeed in increasing safety.
c.Critics agree that the cost of safety regulations and product recalls are negligible.
d.Safety regulations permit people to choose to save money by purchasing riskier (but less expensive) products.

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 264

  1. Legal paternalism is the doctrine that the law
a.may justifiably restrict the freedom of the individual for his or her own good.
b.may justifiably forbid lawsuits against those who act paternalistically.
c.should encourage business to develop a paternal sense of responsibility for consumers.
d.should only restrict people’s freedom in order to protect other people.

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 265

  1. “Puffery” is an example of which of the following deceptive or misleading advertising techniques?
a.ambiguityc.psychological appeals
b.exaggerationd.concealed facts

ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: p. 284

  1. For years Bayer aspirin advertised that it contained “the ingredient doctors recommend most.” This is an example of
a.ambiguity.c.exaggeration.
b.psychological appeals.d.concealed facts.

ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: p. 282

  1. The case of FTC v. Standard Education was important in the legal transition
a.toward the principle of caveat emptor.
b.toward something like the ignorant consumer standard.
c.toward the reasonable-person standard.
d.that removed power from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: p. 287

  1. In deciding whether an ad is deceptive, today the FTC basically follows
a.the reasonable consumer standard.
b.the ignorant/gullible consumer standard.
c.a “modified” ignorant-consumer standard.
d.none of these choices.

ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: p. 287

  1. Harvard business professor Theodore Levitt has
a.drawn an analogy between advertising and art.
b.proven the possibility of effective subliminal advertising.
c.argued that the process of production today creates the very wants it then satisfies.
d.invented the concept of “puffery”.

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 290

  1. According to Galbraith’s “dependence effect,”
a.production depends upon wants.
b.advertising depends on the wants of the consumer.
c.producers use advertising to shape consumer wants.
d.advertising depends on consumerism.

ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: p. 290

  1. Advertising
a.makes the market more efficient.
b.maximizes consumer well-being (thanks to the invisible hand).
c.can’t be restricted without violating the moral rights of advertisers.
d.subsidizes the media.

ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: p. 292

  1. Critics of advertising generally agree that
a.advertising rarely gives consumers much useful information.
b.brand loyalty increases price competition.
c.restrictions on advertising violate the moral rights of advertisers.
d.advertising can only influence us if we want it to.

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 281

  1. Caveat emptor means
a.strict product liability
b.due care
c.let the buyer beware
d.the customer and manufacturer meet as equals

ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: p. 263

  1. Before the case of MacPherson v. Buick Motor Car in 1916, the law based a manufacturer’s liability for injuries due to a defective product on
a.the principle of strict liability.
b.the direct contractual relationship between the producer and the consumer.
c.the principle of the reasonable person.
d.whether or not the manufacturer exercised due care.

ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: p. 262

  1. Due care is
a.based on the principle of caveat emptor.
b.based on the principle “let the buyer beware.”
c.the idea that consumers and sellers do not meet as equals and that consumer’s interests are particularly vulnerable to being harmed by the manufacturer.
d.based on the principle of absolute liability.

ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: p. 263

  1. Which statement is true from an ethical perspective?
a.The argument for strict liability is basically utilitarian.
b.Strict liability is identical with absolute liability.
c.The concept of due care is identical with that of caveat emptor.
d.The argument for due care is basically Kantian.

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 263

  1. In 1972 Congress created one of the most important agencies for regulating product safety. This agency is the
a.Securities and Exchange Commission.
b.Federal Drug Administration Agency.
c.Fair Packaging and Labeling Commission.
d.Consumer Product Safety Commission.

ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: p. 264

  1. Every year ____ of Americans require medical treatment from product related accidents.
a.tens of thousandsc.millions
b.hundredsd.hundreds of thousands

ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: p. 262

  1. People generally speak of two kinds of warranties. What are these two kinds of warranties?
a.express and impliedc.limited and unlimited
b.positive and negatived.legal and moral

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 273

  1. Which of the following is an example of price gouging?
a.Selling World Series Tickets for $300.
b.New York hotels that doubled or tripled their prices in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, attacks.
c.Having to pay above the seller’s original asking price for a home.
d.Increasing the price of lawn movers in the spring and summer.

ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: p. 277

  1. The consumer’s main source of product information is
a.testimonials of other customers.c.word of mouth.
b.billboards.d.the label and package.

ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: p. 278

  1. The goal of advertising is
a.to persuade people to purchase the product.
b.to provide information about goods and services.
c.to provide information about prices.
d.to subsidize the media.

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 281

  1. Terms like “can be,” “as much as,” and “help,” are examples of
a.concealment of facts.c.ambiguity.
b.truth in advertising.d.consumer confidence.

ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: p. 281

  1. The terms “best, finest, and most” are examples of
a.puffery.c.truth in advertising.
b.psychological appeals.d.trust building statements.

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 284

  1. Statistically, there is strong evidence that exposure to television advertising is strongly associated with
a.criminal behavior.
b.obesity in children under twelve.
c.low ethical sensitivity in children under ten.
d.liberal attitudes in children under nine.

ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: p. 289

TRUE/FALSE

  1. Statistics indicate that the faith consumers place in manufacturers is often misplaced.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 262

  1. Strict product liability is the doctrine that the seller of a product has legal responsibilities to compensate the user of that product for injuries suffered due to a defective aspect of the product, even if the seller has not been negligent in permitting that defect to exist.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 263

  1. In the 1960 case Greenman v. Yuba PowerProducts, injured consumers were awarded damages based on their proving that the manufacturers of the defective products were negligent.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 263

  1. In his books The Affluent Society and The New Industrial State, John Kenneth Galbraith argues that consumer wants are never created by advertising or sophisticated sales strategies.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 290

  1. Defenders of advertising claim that, despite criticisms, advertising enjoys protection under the first Amendment as a form of speech.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 292

  1. The doctrine of caveat emptor means that the law may be justifiably used to restrict the freedom of individuals for their own good.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 263

  1. Deceptive advertising is always legal because we have freedom of speech.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 286

  1. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) was established in 1914 to protect consumers against deceptive advertising.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 286

  1. Subliminal advertising is advertising that supposedly communicates at a level beneath our conscious awareness.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 286

  1. Anti-paternalism is often defended on the assumption that individuals know their own interests better than anyone else, and that they are fully informed and able to advance those interests.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 266

  1. Economists can prove, if we grant them enough assumptions, that free-market buying and selling lead to optimal results. One of those assumptions is that everyone has full and complete information, on the basis of which they then buy and sell.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 292

  1. When advertisers conceal facts, they suppress information that is unfavorable to their products.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 282

  1. A psychological appeal is one that aims to persuade by appealing primarily to reason and not to human emotional needs.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 281

  1. The FTC now follows the reasonable-person standard in matters of advertising, sales and marketing.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 287

  1. Due care is the idea that consumers and sellers do not meet as equals and that the consumer’s interests are particularly vulnerable to being harmed by the manufacturer, who has knowledge and expertise the consumer does not have.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 263

  1. Before the case of MacPherson v. Buick Motor Car in 1916, injured consumers could only recover damages from the retailer of the defective product.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 262

  1. Legal paternalism is the doctrine that the law should not be used to restrict the freedom of individuals for their own good.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 265

  1. One decisive case in the legal transition away from the reasonable-person standard in matters of advertising, sales and marketing was FTC v. Standard Education.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 287-288

  1. The FTC now follows the “modified” gullible consumer standard, and it protects consumers from ads that mislead significant numbers of people.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 287

  1. Business’s responsibility for understanding and providing for consumer needs derives from the fact that citizen-consumers are dependent on business to satisfy their needs.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 262

  1. Puffery is illegal.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 284

  1. Strict liability is the same thing as absolute liability.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 263

  1. The controversy over legal paternalism pits the values of individual freedom and autonomy against social welfare.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 266

  1. Businesses are never legally responsible for accidents that occur exclusively as a result of product misuse.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 264

  1. “Weasel words” are words used to evade or retreat from a direct or forthright statement.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 282

SHORT ANSWER

  1. What is the importance of the 1916 case of MacPherson v. Buick Motor Car?

ANS:

See referenced page.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 262

  1. What is due care?

ANS:

See referenced page.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 263

  1. What is the doctrine of caveat emptor?

ANS:

See referenced page.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 263

  1. What is the importance of Greenman v. Yuba Power Products?

ANS:

See referenced page.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 263

  1. What is an argument for strict product liability?

ANS:

See referenced page.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 263

  1. Regulations often benefit consumers, but not always. Name one reason that regulations can sometimes harm consumers.

ANS:

See referenced pages.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 264-265

  1. Give an example of manipulative pricing.

ANS:

See referenced pages.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 274-275

  1. Give an example of labeling or packaging that would be deceptive or misleading.

ANS:

See referenced page.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 279

  1. Give an example of deceptive ambiguity in advertising.

ANS:

See referenced pages.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 281-282

  1. What is subliminal advertising?

ANS:

See referenced page.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 286

ESSAY

  1. Defend the position that advertisers must use imagination and artistic content to address human needs.

ANS:

See referenced page.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 290

  1. Defend the position that advertising manipulates human needs and can create artificial ones.

ANS:

See referenced pages.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 290-292

  1. Why then is there concern about the ethics of advertising? If the consumer is responsible to make the decision, is there anything to justify restricting the advertiser? Justify and explain your answers.

ANS:

See referenced pages.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 289-292

  1. Should cigarette sales be legal? Justify your answer and consider possible objections to it.

ANS:

See referenced pages.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 265-266

  1. Thomas L. Carlson argues that there are four rules that must be followed for a sale to be ethical. What are they, and what objections can be raised against them?

ANS:

Review through chapter.

PTS: 1 REF: Reading 6.1

Chapter 7—The Environment

MULTIPLE CHOICE

  1. Which of the following is true concerning our environment today?
a.the Clean Air Act of 1970 has had no beneficial effects
b.animal waste from factory farms is good for the environment
c.the “greenhouse effect” is basically media hype
d.polluted air is a health risk

ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: p. 329

  1. An ecosystem
a.should never be tampered with.c.can be upset by human behavior.
b.can survive any human intervention.d.is independent of all other ecosystems.

ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: p. 331

  1. The “tragedy of the commons” is
a.the lack of a commons¾a common place where people can come together.
b.the failure to appreciate what we have in common with other species.
c.that cost-benefit analysis involves value judgments that we do not share in common.
d.that individual pursuit of self-interest can sometimes make everyone worse off.

ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: p. 332

  1. Some environmental regulations (like forbidding the burning of coal in cities) benefit each and every one of us because the air we all breather is cleaner. If an individual ignores the regulation and burns coal, while others obey the regulation, then he or she
a.violates our right to a livable environment.
b.is being a free rider.
c.displays an ignorance of ecology.
d.creates an externality.

ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: p. 333

  1. The moral theorist William T. Blackstone claims that the right to a livable environment
a.would solve the problem of how to conserve resources.
b.prevents the use of government regulation to control the actions of business.
c.is a fundamental human right.
d.implies that non-human animals have no genuine moral rights.

ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: p. 333

  1. Cost-benefit analysis
a.is influenced by value judgments.c.values costs over benefits.
b.considers only short-term effects.d.is a value-free social-scientific approach.

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 334

  1. Which environmental statement is true?
a.Tropical forests are the earth’s richest, oldest, and most complex ecosystems.
b.Because of technological breakthroughs, people living in developed countries put less strain on the environment than do people in poorer countries.
c.There are only about 1000 species of animals left in the world.
d.The United States consumes only its proportional share of the world’s irreplaceable natural resources.

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 343

  1. Concerning future generations,
a.all philosophers today reject the idea that future people have rights
b.utilitarianism dictates a radical reduction in population growth
c.future people have a right to be born
d.the social and environmental policies we adopt can affect who is born in the future

ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: p. 344

  1. According to the anthropocentric (or human-oriented) ethic of Baxter and others,
a.environmental preservation is inherently valuable.
b.the Grand Canyon is valuable only because people care about it.
c.we have a strong, almost absolute obligation to preserve species from extinction.
d.future people have no interests that we need to respect now.
e.nature has value in and of itself, apart from human beings.

ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: p. 346

  1. Which of the following is true of factory farms?
a.They are smaller these days than they used to be.
b.The people who run them are brutal.
c.Contrary to the critics, the animals in them rarely suffer.
d.They permit the mass production of meat at low prices.

ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: p. 349

  1. According to Shaw and Barry, utilitarians
a.focus on human well-being and ignore animal welfare.
b.oppose animal experimentation in principle.
c.should include nonhuman animal pleasures and pains in the overall utilitarian calculus.
d.are likely to favor factory farming.

ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: p. 347

  1. Which of the following is true of a regulatory approach to environmental problems?
a.It proceeds on a case-by-case basis, dealing with each company’s specific circumstances.
b.It gives companies an incentive to do more than the minimum required by law.
c.It requires the EPA or other body to determine the most effective, feasible pollution-control technology for each different industry.
d.It involves the use of pricing mechanisms.

ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: p. 338

  1. Animal manure
a.is not available in sufficient quantities to replenish agricultural land.
b.is a large source of pollution.
c.helps counteract the “greenhouse effect”.
d.is potentially more dangerous than nuclear power.

ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: p. 329

  1. “Pollution permits” are an example of which of the following methods of achieving our environmental goals?
a.pricing mechanismsc.a laissez-faire approach
b.government subsidiesd.regulations

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 341

  1. In consideration for the obligation to others,
a.we have no genuine moral obligations to future generations.
b.future people have a right to be born.
c.the U.S. uses more than its proportional share of the world’s resources.
d.environmental protection is always a static trade-off, with a fixed economic price to be paid for the gains we want.

ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: p. 343

  1. One truth about factory farms is
a.they rarely inflict any genuine suffering on animals.
b.most animals we eat are from them.
c.they are necessary to feed the world.
d.they are run by brutal people.

ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: p. 348

  1. According to the philosopher Joel Feinberg,
a.future generations of people have a right to be born.
b.future generations have no moral rights.
c.we have no duties to future generations.
d.the rights of future generations are contingent upon those people coming into existence.

ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: p. 344

  1. William F. Baxter addresses environmental ethics by noting
a.the best ethical position to adopt on environmental issues is a naturalistic position.
b.non-human animals have intrinsic value.
c.judgments about environmental problems ought to be people-oriented.
d.damage to geological “marvels” is inherently wrong and should be prevented.

ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: p. 346

  1. The philosopher Tom Regan
a.claims that no impartial morally sensitive person could approve of the treatment of animals in factory farms if he or she knew what was going on.
b.argues against the use of governmental regulations to control the actions of businesses.
c.believes that the FTC should be abolished.
d.denies that non-human animals have any moral rights.

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 348

  1. According to Holmes Rolston III,
a.naturalistic ethics ought to be abandoned.
b.some natural objects are morally considerable in their own right, apart from human interests.
c.all moral rights are derived from the interests of human beings.
d.nature has no value apart from human beings.

ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: p. 346

  1. A decade after wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone Park, their presence was discovered to
a.not change anything.c.have changed the behavior of elk.
b.have stabilized their own population.d.be disruptive.

ANS: C PTS: 1 REF: p. 330

  1. Business has considered the environment to be
a.a scarce commodity.c.a limited supply.
b.free and nearly limitless.d.costly.

ANS: B PTS: 1 REF: p. 331-332

  1. An assessment of costs and benefits inevitably involves
a.facts.c.false opinions.
b.monetary costs only.d.value judgments and factual uncertainties

ANS: D PTS: 1 REF: p. 334-335

  1. Which of the following is a drawback to the regulatory approach?
a.regulation can take away an industry’s incentive to do more than the minimum
b.regulation is an incentive to an industry to do more than the minimum
c.regulation does not apply to all equally
d.does not require polluters to use the strongest most feasible means of pollution control.

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 339-340

  1. A moral vegetarian
a.rejects eating meat based on moral grounds.
b.only eats animal that were raised humanely.
c.does not believe animals suffer.
d.the pleasure we get from eating a hamburger justifies the price the animals pay.

ANS: A PTS: 1 REF: p. 348

TRUE/FALSE

  1. The new discipline of “ecological economics” calculates the value of an ecosystem, not in terms of what people are willing to pay for it, but in terms of what it would cost to provide the benefits and services that the ecosystem now furnishes us.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 335

  1. Regulation is always the most effective way to allocate the costs of environmental protection.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 342

  1. Advocates of a “naturalistic ethic” believe that penguins are important only because people like them.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 346

  1. Cost-benefit analyses of rival environmental policies inevitably involve making value judgments about nonmonetary costs and benefits.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 335

  1. The word “ecology” refers to the science of the interrelationships among organisms and their environment.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 330

  1. The word “ecosystem” refers to a total ecological community, both living and non-living.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 330

  1. The disparity between private industrial costs and public social costs is what economists call an “internality.”

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 332

  1. Cost-benefit analysis is a device used to determine whether it’s worthwhile to incur a particular cost.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 334

  1. Tampering with the ecosystem always has injurious effects.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 331

  1. When it comes to the protecting animal interests, the United States is far ahead of Europe.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 349

  1. According to Jeremy Bentham, the question is not whether animals can feel pain, but whether they can talk and reason.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 347

  1. Advocates of a naturalistic ethic contend that some natural objects are morally considerable in their own right, apart from human interests.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 346

  1. Moral vegetarians are people who reject the eating of meat on moral grounds.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 348

  1. According to William F. Baxter, we ought to respect the “balance of nature” and “preserve the environment” even if doing so brings no benefit to human beings.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 346

  1. A moral of Garrett Hardin’s parable “The Tragedy of the Commons” is that there can be a difference between the private costs and the social costs of a business activity.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 332

  1. William T. Blackstone rejects the idea that each person has a human right to a livable environment on the grounds that it is technically infeasible.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 333

  1. Three approaches have gained the most attention when it comes to achieving our environmental goals: the use of regulations, incentives, and pricing mechanisms.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 338

  1. According to Joel Feinberg, we can predict various interests of future generations.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 344

  1. Thanks to the EPA, the federal government long ago eliminated the problem of potentially harmful pesticides and other chemical residues in food.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 328

  1. According to Cambridge University biologist Andrew Balmford, the loss of nature’s services is usually outweighed by the benefits of development.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 335

  1. An ordinary example of an ecosystem is a pond.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 330

  1. One of the attitudes prevalent in business that has led to increased environmental problems is the tendency to view the natural world as a free and unlimited good.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 332

  1. The international fishing industry as it exists today gives us good reason to reject the moral of Garrett Hardin’s “Parable of the Commons.”

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 332

  1. The rising affluence of people in the United States has meant a corresponding decrease in pollution and its attendant environmental problems in the United States.

ANS: F PTS: 1 REF: p. 343

  1. Any equitable solution to the problem of who should pay the bill for environmental cleanup should take into account responsibility as well as benefit.

ANS: T PTS: 1 REF: p. 336

SHORT ANSWER

  1. What is the meaning of “ecology”?

ANS:

See referenced page.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 330

  1. What’s an “externality”? Give an environmental example of an externality.

ANS:

See referenced page.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 332

  1. Explain a cost-benefit analysis, and how is it relevant to environmental issues?

ANS:

See referenced page.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 334

  1. What’s a “free rider”?

ANS:

See referenced page.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 333

  1. Briefly describe the two popular answers to the question of who should pay the costs of environmental protections and restorations.

ANS:

See referenced pages.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 336-338

ESSAY

  1. Is it appropriate to have a “valley of death” as described in Case 7.2? If you worked for one of the factories how would you justify the fumes? If you take an environmental view, how would confront the problem?

ANS:

See referenced pages.

PTS: 1 REF: Case 7.2

  1. Is it a moral right or privilege for human beings to live in a clean environment? Defend your answer.

ANS:

See referenced pages.

PTS: 1 REF: Chapter 7

  1. Does that fact that McDonald’s gave in to public opinion mean that all businesses should do the same? Is there ever a time that a business can tell environmentalists that they will not abide by the regulations or requests? Defend your answers.

ANS:

See referenced pages.

PTS: 1 REF: Chapter 7

  1. Are there any differences between environment ethics for humans and animals? Defend your answers.

ANS:

See referenced pages.

PTS: 1 REF: Chapter 7

  1. Would you propose an incentive based program to challenge companies to reduce their environmental liability? Give an example of how this can be done and whether it could ever be effective. Defend your answer.

ANS:

See referenced page.

PTS: 1 REF: p. 340

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