Test Bank Contemporary Human Geography, 4th Edition James M. Rubenstein

$35.00
Test Bank Contemporary Human Geography, 4th Edition James M. Rubenstein

Test Bank Contemporary Human Geography, 4th Edition James M. Rubenstein

$35.00
Test Bank Contemporary Human Geography, 4th Edition James M. Rubenstein

Test Bank Contemporary Human Geography, 4th Edition James M. Rubenstein

Contemporary Human Geography, 4e (Rubenstein)

Chapter 1 This Is Geography

1) Which of the following do geographers NOT do?

  1. A) They identify the location of important places.
  2. B) They organize material chronologically.
  3. C) They explain why one human activity is found near another.
  4. D) They ask where and why.
  5. E) They organize material spatially.

Answer: B

Diff: 1

Section: 1.1 Welcome to Geography

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.1 Compare and contrast geography and history in terms of what geographers and historians do.

2) To explain why different places are interrelated, geographers have three basic concepts

  1. A) place, region and connection.
  2. B) place, region and space.
  3. C) place, scale and space.
  4. D) scale, space and connection.
  5. E) scale, space and region.

Answer: D

Diff: 1

Section: 1.1 Welcome to Geography

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.2 Summarize geography's five most basic concepts.

3) History and geography differ in one especially important matter.

  1. A) History is a much older discipline than geography.
  2. B) A geographer can travel to a different place, but a historian cannot travel back in time.
  3. C) A geographer is limited because most places are inaccessible.
  4. D) History is constantly changing, but geography remains static.
  5. E) Geography studies from a temporal perspective while history examines events from a spatial perspective.

Answer: B

Diff: 1

Section: 1.1 Welcome to Geography

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS17 How to apply geography to interpret the past

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.1 Compare and contrast geography and history in terms of what geographers and historians do.

4) The first person to use the word geography was

  1. A) Aristotle.
  2. B) Eratosthenes.
  3. C) Strabo.
  4. D) Thales of Miletus.
  5. E) Thucydides.

Answer: B

Diff: 1

Section: 1.2 Ancient and Medieval Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS17 How to apply geography to interpret the past

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.3 Trace the development of geography in the ancient world through the Middle Ages to the Age of Exploration.

5) Who was the first to conclude the Earth was spherical based upon empirical evidence?

  1. A) Aristotle
  2. B) Anaximander
  3. C) Strabo
  4. D) Ptolemy
  5. E) Pei Xiu

Answer: A

Diff: 1

Section: 1.2 Ancient and Medieval Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS17 How to apply geography to interpret the past

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.3 Trace the development of geography in the ancient world through the Middle Ages to the Age of Exploration.

6) The science of taking measurements of the Earth's surface is known as

  1. A) demography.
  2. B) photogrammetry.
  3. C) topography.
  4. D) geotagging.
  5. E) meteorology.

Answer: B

Diff: 1

Section: 1.3 Contemporary Geographic Tools

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.4 Identify contemporary analytic tools of geographers, including remote sensing, GPS, and GIS.

7) GIS stands for

  1. A) General Information System.
  2. B) Geocoded Information Satellite.
  3. C) Geographic Information System.
  4. D) Geographic Intended Science.
  5. E) Geotagged Informative Situation.

Answer: C

Diff: 1

Section: 1.3 Contemporary Geographic Tools

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.4 Identify contemporary analytic tools of geographers, including remote sensing, GPS, and GIS.

8) A map that overlays data from one source on top of a map provided by a mapping service (such as Google Maps) is known as a

  1. A) mashup.
  2. B) VGI.
  3. C) GPS.
  4. D) GIS.
  5. E) citizen science project.

Answer: A

Diff: 1

Section: 1.3 Contemporary Geographic Tools

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.5 Describe the role of Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) and mashups in contemporary geography.

9) A computer system that stores, organizes, queries, analyzes, and displays geographic data is known as a

  1. A) GIS.
  2. B) GPS.
  3. C) remote sensing system.
  4. D) USGS.
  5. E) mashup.

Answer: A

Diff: 1

Section: 1.3 Contemporary Geographic Tools

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.4 Identify contemporary analytic tools of geographers, including remote sensing, GPS, and GIS.

10) The acquisition of data about Earth's surface from a satellite orbiting the planet or from another long-distance method is

  1. A) GIS.
  2. B) GPS.
  3. C) remote sensing.
  4. D) aerial photography.
  5. E) USGS.

Answer: C

Diff: 1

Section: 1.3 Contemporary Geographic Tools

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.4 Identify contemporary analytic tools of geographers, including remote sensing, GPS, and GIS.

11) Map scale is

  1. A) the system used by geographers to transfer locations from a globe to a map.
  2. B) the extent of spread of a phenomenon over a given area.
  3. C) the difference in elevation between two points in an area.
  4. D) the relationship between the length of a feature's size on a map to its actual size on Earth.
  5. E) the ratio of the largest to smallest areas on a map.

Answer: D

Diff: 1

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO3 Read and interpret graphs and data

Learning Outcome: 1.6 Explain three ways of representing scale on a map: ratio scales; written scales; and graphic scales.

12) 1:24,000 is an example of what kind of scale?

  1. A) bar line
  2. B) metric scale
  3. C) graphic scale
  4. D) written scale
  5. E) ratio or fractional scale

Answer: E

Diff: 1

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO4 Demonstrate the quantitative skills needed to succeed in Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.6 Explain three ways of representing scale on a map: ratio scales; written scales; and graphic scales.

13) What is the major problem cartographers face when making a map of the world?

  1. A) scale
  2. B) size
  3. C) distortion
  4. D) location
  5. E) place

Answer: C

Diff: 1

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO3 Read and interpret graphs and data

Learning Outcome: 1.7 Discuss how map projections are used to solve the problem of distortion in flat maps.

14) Which of the following cannot happen as a result of distortion when making a map of the world?

  1. A) The shape of an area can be distorted, so that an area may appear elongated or squat.
  2. B) The distance between two points may increase of decrease.
  3. C) The relative size of different areas may be altered, so that one area may appear larger than another on a map when in reality it is smaller.
  4. D) The direction from one place to another can be distorted.
  5. E) An area which is north of another area may appear to be south of that same area on a map.

Answer: E

Diff: 1

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.7 Discuss how map projections are used to solve the problem of distortion in flat maps.

15) If the scale of a map is 1:100,000, then 1 centimeter on the map represents ________ on Earth's surface.

  1. A) 1 kilometer
  2. B) 10 kilometers
  3. C) 10,000 kilometers
  4. D) 100,000 kilometers
  5. E) It depends on the size of the map.

Answer: A

Diff: 2

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO4 Demonstrate the quantitative skills needed to succeed in Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.6 Explain three ways of representing scale on a map: ratio scales; written scales; and graphic scales.

16) In terms of map scale, a ratio of 1:2,000,000 means

  1. A) 1 unit on the map represents 2 million of the same unit on the ground.
  2. B) 1 unit on the ground represents 2 million of the same unit on the map.
  3. C) the ratio between the smallest and largest features on the map.
  4. D) the ratio between the largest and smallest features on the map.
  5. E) the number of maps in print.

Answer: A

Diff: 2

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO4 Demonstrate the quantitative skills needed to succeed in Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.6 Explain three ways of representing scale on a map: ratio scales; written scales; and graphic scales.

17) Which map has the largest scale?

  1. A) 1/10,000,000
  2. B) 1/1,000,000
  3. C) 1/240,000
  4. D) 1/100,000
  5. E) 1/24,000

Answer: E

Diff: 2

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO4 Demonstrate the quantitative skills needed to succeed in Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.6 Explain three ways of representing scale on a map: ratio scales; written scales; and graphic scales.

18) Compared to a globe, Greenland would appear on a Mercator Projection as

  1. A) in the opposite hemisphere.
  2. B) relatively small as compared to Africa.
  3. C) relatively large as compared to Africa.
  4. D) possessing much more topographical features.
  5. E) exactly the same relative size to the other land masses.

Answer: C

Diff: 2

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO3 Read and interpret graphs and data

Learning Outcome: 1.7 Discuss how map projections are used to solve the problem of distortion in flat maps.

19) The following projection is a

  1. A) Mercator Projection.
  2. B) Robinson Projection.
  3. C) Goode Holmosine Projection.
  4. D) Gall-Peters Projection.
  5. E) mashup projection.

Answer: A

Diff: 2

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO3 Read and interpret graphs and data

Learning Outcome: 1.7 Discuss how map projections are used to solve the problem of distortion in flat maps.

20) You have a fractional scale of 1:100,000. Which of the following written scales is correct?

  1. A) one inch equals one mile
  2. B) one foot equals one mile
  3. C) one centimeter equals one meter
  4. D) one centimeter equals one kilometer
  5. E) one centimeter equals one hundred kilometers

Answer: D

Diff: 2

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO4 Demonstrate the quantitative skills needed to succeed in Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.6 Explain three ways of representing scale on a map: ratio scales; written scales; and graphic scales.

21) The following projection is a

  1. A) Mercator Projection.
  2. B) Robinson Projection.
  3. C) Goode Holmosine Projection.
  4. D) Gall-Peters Projection.
  5. E) mashup projection.

Answer: B

Diff: 2

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO3 Read and interpret graphs and data

Learning Outcome: 1.7 Discuss how map projections are used to solve the problem of distortion in flat maps.

22) You are making a map of Africa. The land area of Africa is enormous in size. Which of the following maps scales would be appropriate to use?

  1. A) 1/1000
  2. B) 1/10
  3. C) 1/10,000,000
  4. D) 1/24,000
  5. E) 10/1

Answer: C

Diff: 3

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO4 Demonstrate the quantitative skills needed to succeed in Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.6 Explain three ways of representing scale on a map: ratio scales; written scales; and graphic scales.

23) There are 12 inches in a foot and 5280 feet in a mile. Your map has a written scale of "one inch equals one mile". What is the fractional scale?

  1. A) 1/12
  2. B) 1/1000
  3. C) 1/5280
  4. D) 1/63360
  5. E) 1/440

Answer: D

Diff: 3

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO4 Demonstrate the quantitative skills needed to succeed in Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.6 Explain three ways of representing scale on a map: ratio scales; written scales; and graphic scales.

24) Greenwich Mean Time is measured from

  1. A) 0 degrees latitude.
  2. B) 0 degrees longitude.
  3. C) 90 degrees latitude.
  4. D) 180 degrees longitude.
  5. E) 90 degrees longitude.

Answer: B

Diff: 1

Section: 1.5 The Geographic Grid

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.11 Explain how we use longitude to establish time zones.

25) The International Date Line mostly follows

  1. A) 0 degrees latitude.
  2. B) 0 degrees longitude.
  3. C) 90 degrees latitude.
  4. D) 180 degrees longitude.
  5. E) 90 degrees longitude.

Answer: D

Diff: 1

Section: 1.5 The Geographic Grid

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.9 Compare and contrast the characteristics of both latitude lines and longitude lines.

26) Where would you be located if you experienced exactly 12 hours of daylight?

  1. A) North Pole
  2. B) 0° longitude
  3. C) Equator
  4. D) anywhere on the planet except the poles
  5. E) Greenwich, England

Answer: C

Diff: 1

Section: 1.5 The Geographic Grid

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.9 Compare and contrast the characteristics of both latitude lines and longitude lines.

27) Time changes by one hour for each 15° degree change in longitude; this is because

  1. A) it was determined by how fast 17th century ships could travel.
  2. B) 15° insures that major population centers have unique time zones.
  3. C) early navigation instruments did not allow better accuracy than 15 degrees.
  4. D) 15° was chosen arbitrarily.
  5. E) twenty-four latitude lines were chosen so that 24 hours represents a 360° revolution around the planet.

Answer: E

Diff: 1

Section: 1.5 The Geographic Grid

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO4 Demonstrate the quantitative skills needed to succeed in Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.12 Summarize the historical search in England in the 1700s for a way to measure longitude accurately.

28) You have a geographic coordinate of 65°N, 100°E. What is the only continent where this geographic location could be found?

  1. A) Asia
  2. B) South America
  3. C) Antarctica
  4. D) Australia
  5. E) North America

Answer: A

Diff: 2

Section: 1.5 The Geographic Grid

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO3 Read and interpret graphs and data

Learning Outcome: 1.10 Explain how latitude and longitude are used to locate points on Earth's surface.

29) Denver, Colorado is located at approximately

  1. A) 40°N, 100°S.
  2. B) 40°S, 100°E.
  3. C) 40°N, 100°W.
  4. D) 40°N, 100°E.
  5. E) 40°S, 100°W.

Answer: C

Diff: 2

Section: 1.5 The Geographic Grid

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO3 Read and interpret graphs and data

Learning Outcome: 1.10 Explain how latitude and longitude are used to locate points on Earth's surface.

30) The name given to a portion of Earth's surface is known as

  1. A) location.
  2. B) site.
  3. C) situation.
  4. D) toponym.
  5. E) jargon.

Answer: D

Diff: 1

Section: 1.6 Place: A Unique Location

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS4 The physical and human characteristics of places

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.13 Explain how geographers can use characteristics such as location, site, situation and toponyms to describe the unique nature of place.

31) Site identifies a place by its

  1. A) location relative to other objects.
  2. B) mathematical location on Earth's surface.
  3. C) nominal location.
  4. D) unique physical characteristics.
  5. E) primary dimensions.

Answer: D

Diff: 1

Section: 1.6 Place: A Unique Location

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.13 Explain how geographers can use characteristics such as location, site, situation and toponyms to describe the unique nature of place.

32) Situation identifies a place by its

  1. A) location relative to other objects.
  2. B) mathematical location on Earth's surface.
  3. C) nominal location.
  4. D) unique physical characteristics.
  5. E) primary dimensions.

Answer: A

Diff: 1

Section: 1.6 Place: A Unique Location

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.13 Explain how geographers can use characteristics such as location, site, situation and toponyms to describe the unique nature of place.

33) An area distinguished by one or more distinctive characteristics is a(n)

  1. A) biome.
  2. B) landscape.
  3. C) region.
  4. D) uniform unit.
  5. E) ecosystem.

Answer: C

Diff: 1

Section: 1.7 Region: A Unique Area

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS5 That people create regions to interpret Earth's complexity

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.15 Classify regions as functional, formal, or vernacular.

34) Which is NOT an example of a functional region?

  1. A) the circulation area of a newspaper
  2. B) the area of dominance of a television station
  3. C) the market area of a supermarket
  4. D) the area dominated by a particular crop
  5. E) the area served by a sports franchise

Answer: D

Diff: 1

Section: 1.7 Region: A Unique Area

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS5 That people create regions to interpret Earth's complexity

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.15 Classify regions as functional, formal, or vernacular.

35) The state of Montana is BEST considered a formal region because

  1. A) only one language is spoken everywhere in the region.
  2. B) the same state laws apply everywhere in the region.
  3. C) the climate is the same everywhere in the region.
  4. D) it is a part of the United States.
  5. E) the whole state is mountainous.

Answer: B

Diff: 1

Section: 1.7 Region: A Unique Area

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS5 That people create regions to interpret Earth's complexity

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.15 Classify regions as functional, formal, or vernacular.

36) A formal region defines an area

  1. A) which has a centralized government.
  2. B) which has variation in human or physical geographic characteristics.
  3. C) in which everyone shares in common one or more distinctive characteristics.
  4. D) which is connected by established transportation routes.
  5. E) which is organized around a node.

Answer: C

Diff: 1

Section: 1.7 Region: A Unique Area

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS5 That people create regions to interpret Earth's complexity

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.15 Classify regions as functional, formal, or vernacular.

37) Which of the following is NOT a characteristic which can be used to define a formal region?

  1. A) a common language
  2. B) the production of a specific crop throughout the region
  3. C) the practicing of a specific religious faith
  4. D) the service area of an Internet provider
  5. E) a specific cultural taboo practiced by the vast majority within the region

Answer: D

Diff: 1

Section: 1.7 Region: A Unique Area

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS5 That people create regions to interpret Earth's complexity

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.15 Classify regions as functional, formal, or vernacular.

38) The Midwest of the United States is an example of a

  1. A) formal region.
  2. B) uniform region.
  3. C) cultural landscape.
  4. D) functional region.
  5. E) vernacular (or perceptual) region.

Answer: E

Diff: 1

Section: 1.7 Region: A Unique Area

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS5 That people create regions to interpret Earth's complexity

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.15 Classify regions as functional, formal, or vernacular.

39) Moving toward the Southern border of the United States, English becomes less common and Spanish is more often spoken. What type of region does this gradual change of language reflect?

  1. A) formal
  2. B) functional
  3. C) vernacular
  4. D) bilingual
  5. E) nodal

Answer: A

Diff: 2

Section: 1.7 Region: A Unique Area

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS5 That people create regions to interpret Earth's complexity

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.15 Classify regions as functional, formal, or vernacular.

40) To geographers, the spread of McDonald's around the world represents

  1. A) a popular fad.
  2. B) a unique taste in nearly every location.
  3. C) the relocation diffusion of restaurants.
  4. D) globalization.
  5. E) local diversity.

Answer: D

Diff: 1

Section: 1.8 Scale: From Global to Local

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS11 The patterns and networks of economic interdependence on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.16 Explain how the process of globalization impacts the cultural landscape, local diversity, and access to communication.

41) The Ford Motor Company has assembly plants in many countries, conducts product research on multiple continents and sells its vehicle around the world. Ford is an example of

  1. A) relocation diffusion.
  2. B) a transnational company.
  3. C) spatial association.
  4. D) geographic diversity.
  5. E) a corporate fad.

Answer: B

Diff: 1

Section: 1.8 Scale: From Global to Local

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS11 The patterns and networks of economic interdependence on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.17 Cite examples of changes in economy and culture occurring at global and local scales.

42) Income, life expectancy at birth and non-conforming liquor stores are displayed for Baltimore, Maryland. What spatial association is present?

  1. A) There is a spatial association between high income and low life expectancy at birth.
  2. B) Areas with high numbers of nonconforming liquor stores tend to have higher overall life expectancies.
  3. C) There is a spatial association between areas of low income, low life expectancy and high numbers of nonconforming liquor stores.
  4. D) There is a spatial association between low income and high life expectancy at birth.
  5. E) No spatial associations are present on the featured maps of Baltimore.

Answer: C

Diff: 3

Section: 1.8 Scale: From Global to Local

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS13 How the forces of cooperation and conflict among people influence the division and control of Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO3 Read and interpret graphs and data

Learning Outcome: 1.18 Explain how geographers use spatial association to study the relationships among features of a region.

43) The arrangement of a feature in space is known as its

  1. A) regional analysis.
  2. B) spatial analysis.
  3. C) spatial association.
  4. D) distribution.
  5. E) regional dissociation.

Answer: D

Diff: 1

Section: 1.9 Space: Distribution of Features

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.19 Define density, concentration, and pattern as properties of distribution across space.

44) The frequency with which something occurs in space is known as

  1. A) concentration.
  2. B) density.
  3. C) distribution.
  4. D) pattern.
  5. E) dispersion.

Answer: B

Diff: 1

Section: 1.9 Space: Distribution of Features

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.19 Define density, concentration, and pattern as properties of distribution across space.

45) The extent of a feature's spread over space is its

  1. A) concentration.
  2. B) density.
  3. C) distribution.
  4. D) pattern.
  5. E) diffusion.

Answer: A

Diff: 1

Section: 1.9 Space: Distribution of Features

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.19 Define density, concentration, and pattern as properties of distribution across space.

46) The three main properties of distribution are

  1. A) location, place, time.
  2. B) density, place, diffusion.
  3. C) location, diffusion, concentration.
  4. D) concentration, pattern, place.
  5. E) density, concentration, pattern.

Answer: E

Diff: 1

Section: 1.9 Space: Distribution of Features

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.19 Define density, concentration, and pattern as properties of distribution across space.

47) What has occurred with respect to the distribution of Major League Baseball teams from 1952 to 2018?

  1. A) The number of teams has increased, and as a result the density has also increased and the distribution has become more concentrated.
  2. B) The number of teams has increased, but as a result the density has decreased and the distribution has become more dispersed.
  3. C) The number of teams has increased, and as a result the density has also increased and the distribution has become more dispersed.
  4. D) The number of teams has decreased, and as a result the density has also decreased and the distribution has become more dispersed.
  5. E) The number of teams has decreased, but the density has increased and the distribution has become more concentrated.

Answer: C

Diff: 3

Section: 1.9 Space: Distribution of Features

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS18 How to apply geography to interpret the present and plan for the future

Global Science Standard: GSLO3 Read and interpret graphs and data

Learning Outcome: 1.20 Describe how patterns can vary in time and space.

48) Globally, the average income of women is roughly ________ that of men.

  1. A) 10%
  2. B) 25%
  3. C) 50%
  4. D) 75%
  5. E) 95%

Answer: C

Diff: 1

Section: 1.10 Space: Identity and Inequality

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS11 The patterns and networks of economic interdependence on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.21 Illustrate how distribution and patterns in space can vary according to gender, sexuality and ethnicity.

49) Global income has

  1. A) steadily decreased from 1980 to 2017.
  2. B) remained stable from 1980 to 2017.
  3. C) seen a reduction in the gap between developed countries and developing countries from 1980 to 2017.
  4. D) seen an increase in the gap between developed countries and developing countries from 1980 to 2017.
  5. E) declined precipitously in developed countries and declined by small amounts in developing countries from 1980 to 2017.

Answer: D

Diff: 2

Section: 1.10 Space: Identity and Inequality

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS11 The patterns and networks of economic interdependence on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO3 Read and interpret graphs and data

Learning Outcome: 1.22 Discuss the impact of electronic communications in the context of the inequality between core and periphery and the problem of uneven development.

50) The share of U.S. wealth held by the wealthiest 1% of the population is currently at roughly

  1. A) 1%.
  2. B) 5%.
  3. C) 10%.
  4. D) 15%.
  5. E) 40%.

Answer: E

Diff: 2

Section: 1.10 Space: Identity and Inequality

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS11 The patterns and networks of economic interdependence on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO3 Read and interpret graphs and data

Learning Outcome: 1.22 Discuss the impact of electronic communications in the context of the inequality between core and periphery and the problem of uneven development.

51) The spread of an underlying principle, such as a new technological innovation, is an example of

  1. A) expansion diffusion.
  2. B) stimulus diffusion.
  3. C) distance decay.
  4. D) space-time compression.
  5. E) spatial interaction.

Answer: B

Diff: 1

Section: 1.11 Connection: Diffusion and Interaction

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.23 Identify diffusion, hearth, and spatial interaction.

52) Which is a form of expansion diffusion?

  1. A) contagious
  2. B) relocation
  3. C) distance-decay
  4. D) syncretism
  5. E) hearth diffusion

Answer: A

Diff: 1

Section: 1.11 Connection: Diffusion and Interaction

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.23 Identify diffusion, hearth, and spatial interaction.

53) The process by which a group's cultural features are altered to resemble those of another group is known as

  1. A) assimilation.
  2. B) acculturation.
  3. C) syncretism.
  4. D) spatial networking.
  5. E) distance-decay.

Answer: A

Diff: 1

Section: 1.11 Connection: Diffusion and Interaction

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS12 The processes, patterns, and functions of human settlement

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.24 State three ways in which cultural groups can change as a result of connections across space.

54) The process of changes in culture that result from the meeting of two groups is known as

  1. A) assimilation.
  2. B) acculturation.
  3. C) syncretism.
  4. D) spatial networking.
  5. E) distance-decay.

Answer: B

Diff: 1

Section: 1.11 Connection: Diffusion and Interaction

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS12 The processes, patterns, and functions of human settlement

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.24 State three ways in which cultural groups can change as a result of connections across space.

55) The combination of elements of two groups into a new cultural feature is known as

  1. A) assimilation.
  2. B) acculturation.
  3. C) syncretism.
  4. D) spatial networking.
  5. E) distance-decay.

Answer: C

Diff: 1

Section: 1.11 Connection: Diffusion and Interaction

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS12 The processes, patterns, and functions of human settlement

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.24 State three ways in which cultural groups can change as a result of connections across space.

56) A cultural innovation originates at a node known as a(n)

  1. A) diffusion.
  2. B) distance-decay.
  3. C) hearth.
  4. D) assimilation.
  5. E) network.

Answer: C

Diff: 1

Section: 1.11 Connection: Diffusion and Interaction

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.25 Describe the role of networks, distance decay, and space-time compression in spatial interactions.

57) The reduction in the time it takes to diffuse something to a distant place is known as

  1. A) relocation diffusion.
  2. B) distance-decay theory.
  3. C) space-time compression.
  4. D) acculturation.
  5. E) expansion diffusion.

Answer: C

Diff: 1

Section: 1.11 Connection: Diffusion and Interaction

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.25 Describe the role of networks, distance decay, and space-time compression in spatial interactions.

58) New York is a center of global fashion. A global elite living in Tokyo or Los Angeles will be quicker to adopt a new fashion than a poor resident of New York. This is an example of what type of diffusion?

  1. A) contagious
  2. B) hierarchical
  3. C) stimulus
  4. D) fashion
  5. E) distance-decay

Answer: B

Diff: 2

Section: 1.11 Connection: Diffusion and Interaction

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.23 Identify diffusion, hearth, and spatial interaction.

59) The concept of space-time compression means

  1. A) as an object moves faster through space, time slows for that object.
  2. B) people no longer have time to read books.
  3. C) today it is harder than ever to keep track of what is happening in distant places.
  4. D) distant places in the world are becoming effectively closer together because connections are faster.
  5. E) there is more space in smaller places than ever.

Answer: D

Diff: 2

Section: 1.11 Connection: Diffusion and Interaction

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.25 Describe the role of networks, distance decay, and space-time compression in spatial interactions.

60) The Caribbean islands of Trinidad and Tobago are populated by people who came from India who brought with them their Hindu faith and various languages from South Asia. This is an example of

  1. A) contagious diffusion.
  2. B) relocation diffusion.
  3. C) hierarchical diffusion.
  4. D) expansion diffusion.
  5. E) stimulus diffusion.

Answer: B

Diff: 2

Section: 1.11 Connection: Diffusion and Interaction

Bloom's Taxonomy: Applying/Analyzing

National Geography Standard: NGS12 The processes, patterns, and functions of human settlement

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.24 State three ways in which cultural groups can change as a result of connections across space.

61) For May 2002, how would you best explain the map color difference between the cities of Nantes and Paris?

  1. A) A higher percentage of people in Paris as compared to Nantes possessed Euro coins that were issued by a country other than France.
  2. B) A higher density of people in Paris as compared to Nantes possessed Euro coins that were issued by a country other than France.
  3. C) People in Nantes possessed fewer coins that were issued by a country other than France, as compared to Paris, probably because they tended to use credit cards more.
  4. D) People in Nantes possessed more coins that were issued by a country other than France, as compared to Paris, probably because they tended to use credit cards less.
  5. E) A lower density of people in Paris as compared to Nantes possessed Euro coins that were issued by a country other than France.

Answer: A

Diff: 3

Section: 1.11 Connection: Diffusion and Interaction

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO3 Read and interpret graphs and data

Learning Outcome: 1.25 Describe the role of networks, distance decay, and space-time compression in spatial interactions.

62) Of the four major Earth systems, which one is composed of living organisms?

  1. A) atmosphere
  2. B) hydrosphere
  3. C) lithosphere
  4. D) biosphere
  5. E) cryosphere

Answer: D

Diff: 1

Section: 1.12 Connection: Sustainability

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS7 The physical processes that shape the patterns of Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO5 Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of science on society.

Learning Outcome: 1.26 Explain how the three aspects of sustainability are connected to each other.

63) An ecosystem is best described as

  1. A) a system that is composed of nonliving or inorganic matter.
  2. B) a system composed of living organisms.
  3. C) a group of living organisms and the abiotic spheres with which they interact.
  4. D) all living organisms in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere.
  5. E) a group of living plants and the soil types that is present.

Answer: C

Diff: 1

Section: 1.12 Connection: Sustainability

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS8 The characteristics and spatial distribution of ecosystems and biomes on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.28 Explain how the ecosystems that make up the biosphere interact with Earth's abiotic systems.

64) The use of Earth's resources in ways that ensure their availability in the future is known as

  1. A) environmental determinism.
  2. B) an ecosystem.
  3. C) sustainability.
  4. D) an environmental pillar.
  5. E) conservation.

Answer: C

Diff: 1

Section: 1.12 Connection: Sustainability

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS8 The characteristics and spatial distribution of ecosystems and biomes on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO5 Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of science on society.

Learning Outcome: 1.26 Explain how the three aspects of sustainability are connected to each other.

65) Earth's crust and the adjacent portion of the upper mantle belong to the

  1. A) atmosphere.
  2. B) biosphere.
  3. C) hydrosphere.
  4. D) lithosphere.
  5. E) three pillars of sustainability.

Answer: D

Diff: 1

Section: 1.12 Connection: Sustainability

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS8 The characteristics and spatial distribution of ecosystems and biomes on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO5 Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of science on society.

Learning Outcome: 1.27 Identify the four spheres of the Earth system.

66) According to environmental determinism,

  1. A) the physical environment causes social development.
  2. B) the physical environment sets limits on human actions.
  3. C) people can adjust to the physical environment.
  4. D) people can choose a course of action from many alternatives offered by the physical environment.
  5. E) people determine their physical environment.

Answer: A

Diff: 1

Section: 1.13 Humans and Their Environment

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS15 How physical systems affect human systems

Global Science Standard: GSLO5 Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of science on society.

Learning Outcome: 1.29 Compare and contrast environmental determinism and possibilism.

67) The concept that the physical environment limits human actions, but that people have the ability to adjust to the physical environment is

  1. A) climate.
  2. B) environmental determinism.
  3. C) possibilism.
  4. D) spatial association.
  5. E) cultural relativism.

Answer: C

Diff: 1

Section: 1.13 Humans and Their Environment

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS15 How physical systems affect human systems

Global Science Standard: GSLO5 Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of science on society.

Learning Outcome: 1.29 Compare and contrast environmental determinism and possibilism.

68) The vast majority (80%) of California's water supply is for

  1. A) agriculture.
  2. B) residential usage.
  3. C) private businesses.
  4. D) sale to neighboring states like Arizona and Nevada.
  5. E) diversion to Mexico.

Answer: A

Diff: 1

Section: 1.13 Humans and Their Environment

Bloom's Taxonomy: Remembering/Understanding

National Geography Standard: NGS15 How physical systems affect human systems

Global Science Standard: GSLO5 Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of science on society.

Learning Outcome: 1.30 Evaluate sustainability and environmental modifications of ecosystems in the Netherlands and California.

69) Why do the people of the Netherlands have a big stake in curtailing global warming?

  1. A) They don't have enough fresh drinking water.
  2. B) A rise of the sea level would threaten their dike systems and could cause a significant loss of land created from polders and developed infrastructure.
  3. C) They welcome global warming because it is so cold there.
  4. D) They rely on wind energy, and global warming might change the direction and intensity of the wind.
  5. E) They are responsible for causing much of the global warming and feel responsible.

Answer: B

Diff: 3

Section: 1.13 Humans and Their Environment

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS15 How physical systems affect human systems

Global Science Standard: GSLO5 Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of science on society.

Learning Outcome: 1.30 Evaluate sustainability and environmental modifications of ecosystems in the Netherlands and California.

70) Discuss the differences between the disciplines of history and geography.

Answer: Varies

Diff: 3

Section: 1.1 Welcome to Geography

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.1 Compare and contrast geography and history in terms of what geographers and historians do.

71) What are the some of the contemporary tools used in analytical mapping? Identify at least three tools in your response which are used by geographers to collect and/or analyze geographic data.

Answer: Varies

Diff: 3

Section: 1.3 Contemporary Geographic Tools

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO7 Demonstrate the ability to make connections between concepts across Geography

Learning Outcome: 1.4 Identify contemporary analytic tools of geographers, including remote sensing, GPS, and GIS.

72) You are creating a map of the entire continent of Africa. Would a small scale or a large scale be more appropriate? Why?

Answer: Varies

Diff: 3

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.6 Explain three ways of representing scale on a map: ratio scales; written scales; and graphic scales.

73) Why is a Mercator Projection a poor choice for a map of high-latitude regions of the world?

Answer: Varies

Diff: 3

Section: 1.4 Interpreting Maps

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS1 How to use maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technologies, and spatial thinking to understand and communicate information

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.7 Discuss how map projections are used to solve the problem of distortion in flat maps.

74) Explain the difference between site and situation when discussing location.

Answer: Varies

Diff: 3

Section: 1.6 Place: A Unique Location

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.13 Explain how geographers can use characteristics such as location, site, situation and toponyms to describe the unique nature of place.

75) Discuss the concept of a region in geography.

Answer: Varies

Diff: 3

Section: 1.7 Region: A Unique Area

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS5 That people create regions to interpret Earth's complexity

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.15 Classify regions as functional, formal, or vernacular.

76) List each type of region described in the textbook and give an example of each.

Answer: Formal, functional and vernacular. Examples will vary.

Diff: 3

Section: 1.7 Region: A Unique Area

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS5 That people create regions to interpret Earth's complexity

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.15 Classify regions as functional, formal, or vernacular.

77) Discuss the differences between the three properties of distribution: density, concentration and pattern.

Answer: Varies

Diff: 3

Section: 1.9 Space: Distribution of Features

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.23 Identify diffusion, hearth, and spatial interaction.

78) Describe the differences between contagious, hierarchical and relocation diffusion. Please ensure you give an example of each in your response.

Answer: Varies

Diff: 3

Section: 1.11 Connection: Diffusion and Interaction

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS3 How to analyze the spatial organization of people, places, and environments on Earth's surface

Global Science Standard: GSLO2 Demonstrate the ability to think critically and employ critical thinking skills

Learning Outcome: 1.23 Identify diffusion, hearth, and spatial interaction.

79) Define what is sustainability, making sure to address the Three Pillars of Sustainability in your response.

Answer: Varies

Diff: 3

Section: 1.12 Connection: Sustainability

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS15 How physical systems affect human systems

Global Science Standard: GSLO5 Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of science on society.

Learning Outcome: 1.26 Explain how the three aspects of sustainability are connected to each other.

80) What are the main differences between the environmental determinist and possibilist approaches to cultural ecology?

Answer: Varies

Diff: 3

Section: 1.13 Humans and Their Environment

Bloom's Taxonomy: Evaluating/Creating

National Geography Standard: NGS15 How physical systems affect human systems

Global Science Standard: GSLO5 Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of science on society.

Learning Outcome: 1.29 Compare and contrast environmental determinism and possibilism.

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