Test Bank For Schools and Society-A Sociological Approach to Education 5th Edition by Jeanne H. Ballantine , Joan Z. Spade Test Bank

$45.00
Test Bank For Schools and Society-A Sociological Approach to Education 5th Edition by Jeanne H. Ballantine , Joan Z. Spade Test Bank

Test Bank For Schools and Society-A Sociological Approach to Education 5th Edition by Jeanne H. Ballantine , Joan Z. Spade Test Bank

$45.00
Test Bank For Schools and Society-A Sociological Approach to Education 5th Edition by Jeanne H. Ballantine , Joan Z. Spade Test Bank

Test Bank For Schools and Society-A Sociological Approach to Education 5th Edition by Jeanne H. Ballantine , Joan Z. Spade Test Bank

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Test Bank For Schools and Society-A Sociological Approach to Education 5th Edition by Jeanne H. Ballantine , Joan Z. Spade

Ballantine and Spade, Schools and Society 5th EditionInstructor Resource

  1. Why are racially segregated schools still shown to be unequal in student achievement? What accounts for the differences in achievement levels between schools?

Correct Answer:

Varies

  1. How is educational tracking related to the selection function of schools?

Correct Answer:

Varies

  1. What is the difference between “within-school segregation” and “between school segregation”? Give two examples for each.

Correct Answer:

Varies

  1. Explain why middle-class children participate in more activities outside of school than their working class peers?

Correct Answer:

Varies

  1. Explain what is meant by the “duality” between students and courses.

Correct Answer:

Varies

  1. What are the limitations of previous explanation of racial inequality in educational outcomes and what does Persell propose instead?

Correct Answer:

Varies

  1. Describe what is meant by the black-white racial gap in education and provide practices or policies that you would recommend to decrease this gap.

Correct Answer:

Varies

  1. Describe what is meant by the two dilemmas Mickelson describes in her article and provide practices or policies that you think can be used to try to resolve one of these dilemmas.

Correct Answer:

Varies

  1. The practice of offering courses at different levels of difficulty within subject area is an example of:

  1. Between-school inequality

*b. Within-school inequality

  1. Horizontal curriculum
  2. None of the above

  1. Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas stated that:

  1. Religion couldn’t be practiced in school

*b. Racially separated schools are inherently unequal

  1. Parents have the right to homeschool their children
  2. All of the above
  3. None of the above

  1. According to Logan, Minda, and Adar, studies have shown that:

  1. Black students attend schools with a less experienced teaching staff than do white students.
  2. Hispanic students attend public schools in which most of the children are below the poverty line.
  3. The largest central city school are 70% black and Hispanic

*d. All of the above

  1. None of the above

  1. According to Logan, Minda, and Adar, when controlling for all other variables, it’s shown that ________ is the greatest indicator of a school’s achievement level.

  1. Poverty level

*b. Racial Composition

  1. Location
  2. A and C only
  3. None of the above

  1. According to Ferrare, organization of course-taking corresponds to primary divisions of:

  1. Race
  2. Gender
  3. Class
  4. None of the above

*e. All of the above

  1. According to Ferrare, patterns of courses taking for courses like art, keyboarding, and music are considered to be:

  1. Vertically organized

*b. Horizontally organized

  1. Vocationally organized
  2. Organized according to postsecondary trajectories
  3. None of the above

  1. What is not a reason that middle-class parents gave when asked why they support their children in structured activities:

  1. Their children are interested in the activities
  2. It helps increase their children’s academic skills

*c. It keeps them safe and out of trouble

  1. It lets them socialize more with their peers
  2. None of these

  1. Bennett, Lutz, Jayaram found that:

  1. Working-class students are more likely to be involved in religious activities
  2. Middle-class students are more likely to be involved in hobby activities
  3. Middle-class students are far less likely to be involved in youth development activities

*d. All of the above

  1. None of the above

  1. Morris in the article “Rednecks, Rutters and Rithmetic,” felt hegemonic masculinity was related to:

  1. Academic nonchalance
  2. Physical toughness
  3. School engagement
  4. Academic achievement

*e. None of the above

  1. Which of the following is NOT an explanation of racial inequality in educational achievement as described by Persell?

*a. Political explanations

  1. Genetic explanations
  2. Structural explanations
  3. Cultural explanations
  4. None of the above

  1. As described in the Persell article, Hernstein and Murray’s Bell Curve provides an argument in support of __________ explanations for racial inequality in education.

*a. Genetic

  1. Structural
  2. Cultural
  3. Economic
  4. None of the above

  1. Tracking and ability grouping influences students’ exposure to the:

*a. Formal curriculum

  1. Hidden curriculum
  2. Informal curriculum
  3. Vertical curriculum
  4. None of the above

  1. According to Mickelson, males continue to outnumber women in ___________ programs.

  1. English
  2. Nursing

*c. Engineering

  1. Sociology
  2. None of the above

  1. Which is NOT an explanation used by Mickelson for the gender gap in education?

  1. Labor discrimination no longer exists

*b. Women are not as educated as men

  1. Women expect returns on schooling from spouse’s occupational success
  2. Women are socialized to respond to external validation
  3. All of the above

  1. One of the reasons Mickelson gives for why boys don’t do as well in schools as girls is:

  1. Females attend better schools
  2. Females are socialized to believe they are smarter

*c. Males get better jobs and higher pay regardless of how well they do in school

  1. Males are more focused on sexuality and competition than females
  2. None of the above

  1. Minorities often attend different schools than majorities.

*a. True

  1. False

  1. Studies have found that immigrant students typically have lower educational outcomes than native born students.

  1. True

*b. False

  1. According to Ferrare, a typical contemporary high school in the United States will unequally distribute students into curricular positions that are associated with gender.

  1. True

*b. False

  1. Middle-class parents like to have their children engage in activities because of the future opportunities that it could give to them.

  1. True

*b. False

  1. Outside of school, working-class children are more likely to be engaged in religious based activities than their middle-class peers.

*a. True

  1. False

  1. Schools always serve to level class differences by offering structured activity participation that are tied to individual schools.

  1. True

*b. False

  1. Students in the Texas high school studied by Morris used “rutter” as a positive identity and “redneck” as a negative identity.

  1. True

*b. False

  1. According to Persell, Black students value education at least as much as White students.

*a. True

  1. False

  1. Academic achievement of Blacks is more likely to be influenced by the racial composition of the school/community than is academic achievement for Whites.

*a. True

  1. False

  1. Mickelson finds that males from higher social class backgrounds do just as well as females in terms of academic achievement.

*a. True

  1. False

  1. Mickelson reported that males do better than females on SAT tests.

*a. True

  1. False
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