Test Bank for Visualizing Human Geography 3rd Edition by Alyson L. Greiner

$35.00
Test Bank for Visualizing Human Geography 3rd Edition by Alyson L. Greiner

Test Bank for Visualizing Human Geography 3rd Edition by Alyson L. Greiner

$35.00
Test Bank for Visualizing Human Geography 3rd Edition by Alyson L. Greiner

Test Bank for Visualizing Human Geography 3rd Edition by Alyson L. Greiner

At Home in a Diverse World, 3rd Edition

Package Title: Testbank

Course Title: Visualizing Human Geography, 3rd Edition Chapter Number: 01

Question Type: Multiple Choice

  1. The world geography means:

A) to write about the sun.

B) to write about the stars.

C) to write about Earth.

D) to write about Mars.

E) to write about Venus.

Answer: C Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. Physical geography focuses primarily on:

A) social dynamics.

B) cultural dynamics.

C) language dynamics.

D) environmental dynamics.

E) music dynamics.

Answer: D Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography.

Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. An important subfield within human geography that studies the relationship between people and the natural environment is:

A) cultural ecology.

B) physical geography.

C) sociology.

D) urban geography.

E) environmental ecology.

Answer: A

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. A body of thought that emphasizes that humans and nonhumans are linked together in a dynamic set of relations that, in turn, influence human behavior is known as:

A) cultural ecology.

B) possibilism.

C) connectivity.

D) environmental determinism.

E) actor-network theory.

Answer: E Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. What makes actor-network theory so radical is that it challenges the idea that:

A) people have social networks.

B) people understand their environment.

C) people cannot live in isolation.

D) people have free will.

E) people do not have access to resources.

Answer: D Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. Reactions against environmental determinism in the early 20th century gave rise to , the view that people use their creativity to decide how to respond to the conditions or constraints of a particular natural environment.

A) political ecology

B) cultural ecology

C) possibilism

D) nature-culture dualism

E) cultural landscape Answer: C

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. Regional analysis involves:

A) studying the sameness of regions.

B) studying the distinctiveness of regions.

C) identifying environmental determinism.

D) all of the above.

E) none of the above.

Answer: B Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. A formal region is:

A) derived from people’s sense of identity and attachment to different areas.

B) nonexistent in developing nations.

C) an area that possesses one or more unifying cultural or physical traits.

D) an area unified by a specific social, cultural, or economic activity.

E) an area that possesses only one specific cultural trait.

Answer: C Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography.

Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. A functional region is:

A) derived from people’s sense of identity and attachment to different areas.

B) non-existent in developing nations.

C) an area that possesses one or more unifying cultural or physical traits.

D) an area unified by a specific social, political, or economic activity.

E) an area that possesses only one specific cultural trait.

Answer: D Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. Which of the following: statements about culture is

incorrect?

A) Culture is a social creation that reflects diverse economic, historical, political, and environmental factors.

B) Culture is dynamic, not fixed, and can be contested.

C) Culture is a complex system.

D) Culture is never tied to politics.

E) Culture shapes and influences people.

Answer: D Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. A location distinguished by specific physical and cultural characteristics is a

A) place.

B) space.

C) site.

D) situation.

E) culture.

Answer: A Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. is the product of spatial and social processes.

a) Spatial variation

b) Relative space

c) Relational space

d) Spatial association

Answer: C Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. refers to the degree in which two or more

phenomena share similar distributions.

A) Spatial variation

B) Distribution

C) Spatial association

D) Spatial diffusion

E) Globalization Answer: C

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. The most common type of relocation diffusion is:

A) globalization.

B) migration.

C) complimentarity.

D) spatial interaction.

E) spatial variation.

Answer: B

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. The tapering off of a process, pattern, or event over a distance is known as:

A) intervening opportunity.

B) transferability.

C) distance decay.

D) mobility.

E) time-space convergence.

Answer: C Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that

form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. The sociologist Anthony Giddens argues that the same technological innovations that lead to time-space convergence also create:

A) spatial diffusion.

B) globalization.

C) distance decay.

D) time-space expressions

E) time-space distanciation.

Answer: E Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. Although the first GPS satellite was put into orbit in the , GPS did not provide global coverage until

.

A) 1960s; 1990

B) 1970s; 1995

C) 1970s;

1990

D) 1980s;

1995

E) 1990s;

2000

Answer: B

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Describe the tools human geographers use and how they apply them.

Section Reference: Geographical Tools

  1. Acquiring information about something that is located at a distance from you is known as:

A) geographic information systems.

B) global positioning systems.

C) remote sensing.

D) geographic scale.

E) relocation diffusion.

Answer: C Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Describe the tools human geographers use and how they apply them.

Section Reference: Geographical Tools

  1. The borders of a tend to be highly contested

since people often have very personal reasons for perceiving an area a certain way.

A) perceptual regions

B) formal regions

C) functional regions

D) transitional regions

E) peripheral regions Answer: A

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. The significance of the reconceptualization of culture is that it:

A) aims to promote multiculturalism.

B) seeks to make the practice of human geography even more vigorous.

C) strives to foster intercultural communication.

D) maintains harmony among all cultures in the world.

E) enhances the cultural experience.

Answer: B Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

Question Type: True/False

  1. Nature is the physical environment; it is external to people and does not include them.

Answer: True. Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. Cultural ecology is an important subfield within human geography which studies the relationship between people and the natural environment.

Answer: True Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. The intellectual roots of environmental determinism can be traced back to the ancient Romans, who speculated that human diversity resulted from both climatic and locational factors.

Answer: False

Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. Understanding how and why the South differs from New England culturally, economically, and politically is an example of regional analysis.

Answer: True Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. Relative space is not fixed. Instead, it varies depending on our frame of reference.

Answer: True Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. Distribution is the arrangement of phenomena on or near Earth’s surface

Answer: True Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that

form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. The term spatial diffusion was first coined by geographer Edward Ullman in 1954.

Answer: False Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. Like the friction of distance, intervening opportunities can alter the spatial interaction between places.

Answer: True Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. Globalization propels and is propelled by spatial interaction.

Answer: True Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that

form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. An intertwining opportunity is a different location that can provide a desired good more economically.

Answer: False Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that

form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. The diffusion of H1N1 flu since April 2009 provides a good example of spatial diffusion.

Answer: True Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. Hierarchical diffusion is completely random.

Answer: False Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. Geographers recognize four different types of diffusion: relocation, contagious, hierarchical, and simultaneous.

Answer: False Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. The term geoslavery has been coined to reflect issues that have been raised due to GPS technology.

Answer: True Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Describe the tools human geographers use and how they apply them.

Section Reference: Geographical Tools

  1. The most common system used for indirect georeferencing is latitude and longitude.

Answer: False Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Describe the tools human geographers use and how they apply them

Section Reference: Geographical Tools

  1. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology can help solve social problems.

Answer: True Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Describe the tools human geographers use and how they apply them

Section Reference: Geographical Tools

  1. Environmental determinism prevailed among American geographers during the early 20th century and then fell quickly into disfavor.

Answer: True Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography.

Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. Possibilism is not one of the four ways that geographers conceptualize the relationship between people and nature.

Answer: False Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

Question Type: Essay

  1. Explain the basis for the nature-culture dualism.

Potential Answer: Page 4

  • Nature is the physical environment, it is external to people and does not include them. People, because of their capacity for intellectual and moral development, are the bearers of culture, and it is culture that distinguishes people from nature. When understood in this way, these concepts yield a dualistic framework that sets nature and culture in opposition to one another. This nature-culture dualism has had a

significant impact on ways of thinking about social differences.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. Compare and contrast formal, functional, and perceptual regions.

Potential Answer: Page 6

  • A formal region is an area that possesses one or more unifying physical or cultural traits. A functional region is unified by a specific economic, political, or social activity. Every functional region has at least one node, usually the business, office, or entity that coordinates the activity. In contrast to both formal and functional regions, perceptual regions derive from people’s sense of identity and attachment to different areas. The borders of perceptual regions tend to be highly variable since people often have very personal reasons for perceiving an area in a certain way.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. Explain the recent reconceptualization of culture.

Potential Answer: Pages 7-8

  • Recently, certain geographers have stressed the point that we should think of culture as an abstract concept, not as a material item or collection of cultural traits. Therefore, culture is a social construction that reflects diverse economic, historical, political, social, and environmental factors. Culture is dynamic, not fixed, and can be contested. This is illustrated by the phrase “culture wars.” Culture is a complex system. Through interactions with one another, people create and express culture, and in turn, culture shapes and influences people.

Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. What is the relationship between globalization, spatial interaction, and time-space convergence?

Potential Answer: Pages 13, 15-16

  • Globalization propels and is propelled by spatial interaction-the connections and relations that develop among places and regions as a result of the movement or flow of people, goods, or information.
  • Technological innovations in transportation and communication have made it possible to reduce the friction of distance. When this happens, places seem to become closer together in both time and space, which is known as time-space convergence. Time-space convergence highlights the important of relative distance. Absolute distance refers to the physical measure of separation between points or places in meters or feet, relative distance expresses the separation between points or places in terms of time, cost, or some other measure. Globalization does not alter the absolute distance between places, but it can change their accessibility, more places become interconnected. Moreover, globalization can reduce the friction of distance, bringing about a change in our sense of relative distance and making it seem as though distant places have become closer together.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. Why is it important for geographers to distinguish between site and situation factors? Provide examples of site and situation factors.

Potential Answer: Pages 8-9

  • Site is the physical characteristic of a place, such as its topography, vegetation, and water resources. Situation is the geographic context of a place, including its political, economic, social, or other characteristics. By considering site and situation, we

can make sense of the location and context of any place.

  • Example: Istanbul, Turkey - Physically, Istanbul occupies a hilly site adjacent to a deep harbor and has grown on both sides of the Bosporus, a narrow and strategic waterway that connects the Mediterranean and Black seas. By virtue of its situation, Istanbul straddles the regions of Europe and Asia. Istanbul’s growth as a major port stems from attributes of its site and situation along an important strait.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. Compare and contrast the four different types of diffusion. Cite examples for each type of diffusion.

Potential Answer: Page 11

  • Geographers recognize four different types of diffusion: relocation, contagious, hierarchical, and stimulus. Migration is the most common type of relocation diffusion. Contagious diffusion occurs when a phenomenon, such as the common cold, spreads randomly from one person to another. In contrast, hierarchical diffusion occurs in a top-down or rank- order manner. See Figure 1.9 for an explanation of hierarchical diffusion. Stimulus diffusion occurs when the spread of an idea, a practice, or other phenomenon prompts a new idea or innovation. A great deal of stimulus diffusion affects the production and marketing of goods. We can see this readily in the automobile and fast-food industries, for example.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. What are the three factors that influence spatial interaction? Describe each of these in detail and use examples to highlight their significance to spatial interaction.

Potential Answer: Pages 14-15

  • Complementarity exists when one place or region can supply the demand for resources or goods in another place or region. In other words, complementarity provides a basis for trade. Leading coffee producers, such as Brazil, Colombia, and Indonesia, help satisfy the demand for coffee in major consuming regions, such as Western Europe and North America, and create a condition of complementarity. Spatial interaction as a result of complementarity can involve short or long distances. Complementarity also exists when people travel from their homes to a movie theater or a gas station.

  • A second factor that influences spatial interaction is transferability—the cost of moving a good and the ability of the good to withstand that cost. High-value goods that are not bulky and can be easily transported, such as jewelry, have high transferability. Low-value, bulky goods, such as rocks or hay, have low transferability. In general, goods with low transferability are more likely to be used near their source. Transferability is affected by the friction of distance, or the way that distance can impede movement or interaction between places.

  • An intervening opportunity is a different location that can provide a desired good more economically. Like the friction of distance, intervening opportunities can alter the spatial interaction between places. If you usually stop at the same gas station to fill up your car but decide to frequent another gas station because you have noticed it has lower prices, you have taken advantage of an intervening opportunity. Intervening opportunities are important because they help reconfigure the flows and relations between places.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. How does a geographer measure the human body using geographical tools? Why is this important?

Potential Answer: Page 17

  • Geographers use observational scale to study the human body as the most detailed levels of analysis. The body or self-constitutes an important scale because it provides a basis for personal and individual identity.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. What are some of the major criticisms of Global Positioning System (GPS) technology?

Potential Answer: Pages 20-21

  • GPS technology raises a host of thorny ethical questions. Often there is a fine line between a service and surveillance. Law enforcement officials can use GPS to track the locations of parolees, and parents can use it to know the whereabouts of their kids. Geographers Jerome Dobson and Peter Fisher coined the term geoslavery to refer to “a practice in which one entity, the master, coercively or surreptitiously monitors and exerts control over the physical location of another individual, the slave” (2003, pp. 47–48).

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Describe the tools human geographers use and how they apply them. Section Reference: Geographical Tools

Question Type: Short Answer

  1. is the movement of a phenomenon across space and over time.

Answer: Spatial diffusion Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. Globalization propels and is propelled by

, the connections and relations that develop among places and regions as a result of the movement or flow of people, goods, or information.

Answer: Spatial Interaction Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that

form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. The degree to which two or more phenomena share similar distributions is known as .

Answer: Spatial Association Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. When one place or region can supply the demand for resources or goods in another place or region this is called.

Answer: Complementarity Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. is data tied to locations on Earth.

Answer: Georeferenced Data Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Describe the tools human geographers use and how they apply them.

Section Reference: Geographical Tools

  1. The cost of moving a good and the ability of the good to withstand that cost is called .

Answer: Transferability Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. Complementarity stems from .

Answer: Spatial Variation Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. involves studying the

distinctiveness of regions.

Answer: Regional Analysis Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. The phrase “ ” stems from the idea that culture is dynamic, not fixed, and can be contested.

Answer: Culture Wars Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. A word which means the physical characteristics of a place, such as its topography, vegetation, and water resources is .

Answer: Site

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. Figure 1.3 depicts a in the United Arab Emirates as an example of an extreme cultural landscape.

A) amusement park

B) winery

C) ski-resort

D) nightclub

E) beach Answer: C

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography


  1. In Figure 1.8b high poverty rates in Vietnam coincide with

A) mudslides

B) uneven mountain ranges

C) flooding

D) high forest cover

E) monsoons

Answer: D Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. The actor-network theory represents that our surroundings have no influence on us, as illustrated in

Figure 1.2.

Answer: False Difficulty: Hard

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography


  1. The billboard shown in Figure 1.4c is located in Chickasaw Country. This regions is a formal region.

Answer: False Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objectives: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. Power, identity, and class are invisible dimensions in the establishment of the gated community depicted in Figure

1.5

Answer: True Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

  1. Istanbul’s growth as a major port stems from attributes of its site and situation along an important strait, as


seen in Figure 1.6.

Answer: True Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. In Figure 1.8a, the spatial variation of closed forests in Vietnam changes markedly from east to west across the


country.

Answer: False Difficulty: Medium

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer


  1. Figure 1.9b reflects Chicago and Baltimore as fashion industry hubs.

Answer: False Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer Question Type: Essay

  1. How does the existence of a mountain-themed resort facility in United Arab Emirates in Figure 1.3 reflect the

concept of human agency?

Potential Answer: Pages 5-6

  • The mountain-themed resort is an example of humans as modifiers, where nature is a social construction—an invented concept derived from shared perceptions and understandings. This perspective acknowledges that people shape the natural environment through their practices and their ideas about what nature is or should be.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography


  1. What are the site and situation factors in Figure 1.6b that have contributed to Istanbul’s economy?

Potential Answer: Pages 8-9

  • Physically, Istanbul occupies a hilly site adjacent to a deep harbor and has grown on both sides of the Bosporus, a narrow and strategic waterway that connects the Mediterranean and Black seas. By virtue of its situation, Istanbul straddles the regions of Europe and Asia. Istanbul’s growth as a major port stems from attributes of its site and situation along an important strait.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. Based on Figure 1.13, think about the body as a personal space and a scale. Do you think these are

components we can control?

Potential Answer: Page 17 Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Explain the five main concepts that form the basis of geographical inquiry.

Section Reference: Thinking Like a Human Geographer

  1. Using the tools presented in Figure 1.14d, how could a geographer assess post-earthquake damage?

Potential Answer: Page 18

  • A geographer could use remotely sensed imagery to identify structural damage across the affected area, because building collapse produces an identifiable textural signature not present in areas where buildings have not collapsed. The collapse of building changes the cultural landscape, in effect creating more edges. Using these textural signatures, geographers can then create maps identifying regions with significant percentages of collapsed buildings. Identifying high-damage areas is essential to relief coordination following a natural disaster.
  • Visually, we can see this pattern in the more chaotic and brighter appearance of the images, but the use of software to detect these changes speeds up the analytical process.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Describe the tools human geographers use and how they apply them.

Section Reference: Geographical Tools


  1. What spatial associations in disease incidence can you identify from Figure 1.18b?

Potential Answer: Page 21

  • West Nile virus is more concentrated in the western part of the state and associated with agriculture and row crops.

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Describe the tools human geographers use and how they apply them.

Section Reference: Geographical Tools


  1. What other analogies besides a lawn could you substitute in Figure 1.2 to represent actor-network theory?

Answer:

Difficulty: Easy

Learning Objective: Discuss the scope of human geography. Section Reference: Introducing Human Geography

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