Test Bank Marriages and Families Changes, Choices, and Constraints 9th Edition Nijole V. Benokraitis A+

$35.00
Test Bank Marriages and Families Changes, Choices, and Constraints 9th Edition Nijole V. Benokraitis A+

Test Bank Marriages and Families Changes, Choices, and Constraints 9th Edition Nijole V. Benokraitis A+

$35.00
Test Bank Marriages and Families Changes, Choices, and Constraints 9th Edition Nijole V. Benokraitis A+

1.1 Quick Quiz

  1. According to Social Security laws, which of the following is true of employee health care benefits?
    1. They do not cover a worker’s dependent parents.
    2. They cover a worker’s children.
    3. They cover a worker’s child born out of wedlock.
    4. They cover unmarried partners who have long-term committed relationships.

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.1 Explain how traditional and contemporary definitions of family differ.

Topic: What Is a Family?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. __________ are nonrelatives who are accepted as part of the family because they have strong bonds with biological family members and provide important services and care.
    1. Fictive kin
    2. Blood kin
    3. Primary groups
    4. Secondary groups

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.1 Explain how traditional and contemporary definitions of family differ.

Topic: What Is a Family?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. A marriage in which the couple must follow procedures specified by the state or other jurisdiction, such as buying a license, is called a __________.
    1. ceremonial marriage
    2. common-law marriage
    3. nonceremonial marriage
    4. domestic partnership

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.2 Describe five ways that families are similar worldwide.

Topic: How Are Families Similar Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. A __________ is a small group of people who are characterized by close, long-lasting, intimate, and face-to-face interaction.
    1. primary group
    2. secondary group
    3. kinship group
    4. blood family group

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.2 Describe five ways that families are similar worldwide.

Topic: How Are Families Similar Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. The family into which a person is adopted or raised is called the family of __________.
    1. orientation
    2. procreation
    3. emplacement
    4. origin

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. Scholars who embrace the __________ perspective, argue that multi-generational households and the ability to leave unhappy family situations are benefits of modern family structures.
    1. family resiliency
    2. family declining
    3. family change
    4. family disappearance

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.5 Compare the three perspectives on why families are changing.

Topic: Three Perspectives on the Changing Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. During a debate about the changing nature of families, Jim states that family problems are more prevalent today. However, Ryan believes otherwise and argues that family issues have always existed. Which of the following is an accurate statement that strengthens Ryan’s argument?
    1. Out of wedlock births, domestic violence, and desertion by a parent or spouse were experienced rarely in the past.
    2. Domestic violence occurred in the past but was mostly invisible in society.
    3. Teenage pregnancy rates were lower in the 1950s than they are today.
    4. Historical data about families in the past indicate that families were stronger then than they are now.

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.4 Describe five myths about families and distinguish between functional and dysfunctional myths.

Topic: Some Myths about the Family

Difficulty Level: Difficult

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. Martha and Peter have been in a committed relationship for the past 8 years. They care for each other and share all domestic and financial responsibilities. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, which of the following is true of their living arrangement?
    1. It is a nonfamily household.
    2. It is family household.
    3. It is an illegal arrangement.
    4. It is a fictive household.

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.6 Explain how U.S. families have been changing in terms of demographic characteristics and racial-ethnic diversity.

Topic: How Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Joe and Jenny, two software professionals who loved to party and travel, were married for just over two years when they filed for divorce. Their families and friends took a micro-level perspective of their separation. Which of the following best represents their perspective?
    1. The divorce was a result of technological advancements, the Internet, and online social networking.
    2. The divorce was a result of popular culture including television, pop music, magazines, and movies, which are major sources of misinformation about family life.
    3. The divorce was a result of women’s movements, which transformed Jenny by making her less financially dependent on Joe.
    4. The divorce was a result of their unrealistic and immature decisions regarding their lifestyle.

Answer: D

Learning Objective: 1.7 Explain how macro-level constraints affect families’ micro-level choices.

Topic: Why Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Which of the following is a reason why the text adopts a cross-cultural or global view to understand families?
    1. It challenges our notion that U.S. families are the norm.
    2. It helps students maintain a more homogeneous family.
    3. It encourages students to have an ethnocentric belief in the superiority of their own culture.
    4. It helps companies limit the kinds of family forms they are willing to support with company policy.

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.8 Explain why multicultural, cross-cultural, and global perspectives are important in understanding families.

Topic: A Multicultural, Cross-Cultural, and Global Perspective on the Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

1.2 Test Questions

  1. According to the text a __________ is a unit made up of two or more people who are related by blood, marriage, or adoption; live together; form an economic unit; and bear and raise children.
    1. consanguineal family
    2. traditional family
    3. nurtured family
    4. affiant family

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.1 Explain how traditional and contemporary definitions of family differ.

Topic: What Is a Family?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. Lisa and James volunteer as a host family in a foreign exchange student program at the local university. They provide accommodation, food, and a family environment to an exchange student. They volunteer to experience a new culture and at the same time provide a new cultural experience to the student. The relationship between them and the exchange student exemplifies a(n) __________.
    1. fictive kinship
    2. lineal kinship
    3. affiant kinship
    4. consanguineal kinship

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.1 Explain how traditional and contemporary definitions of family differ.

Topic: What Is a Family?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Which of the following is a difference between traditional and current definitions of the family?
    1. Unlike current definitions of the family, traditional definitions encompass fictive kin.
    2. Unlike traditional definitions of the family, current definitions exclude child-free couples.
    3. Unlike traditional definitions of the family, current definitions do not explicitly include marriage and procreation.
    4. Unlike current definitions of the family, traditional definitions include diverse groups such as foster parents and their charges.

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.1 Explain how traditional and contemporary definitions of family differ.

Topic: What Is a Family?

Difficulty Level: Difficult

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. __________ refer to culturally defined rules for behavior.
    1. Roles
    2. Accommodations
    3. Norms
    4. Taboos

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.2 Describe five ways that families are similar worldwide.

Topic: How Are Families Similar Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. __________ refers to the cultural norms and laws that forbid sexual intercourse between close blood relatives, such as brother and sister, father and daughter, uncle and niece, or grandparent and grandchild.
    1. Menstrual taboo
    2. Endogamy
    3. Incest taboo
    4. Polygamy

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.2 Describe five ways that families are similar worldwide.

Topic: How Are Families Similar Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. Which of the following is characteristic of a primary group?
    1. impersonal relationships
    2. few emotional ties to one another
    3. close, intimate interaction
    4. similar standing or rank based on wealth

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.2 Describe five ways that families are similar worldwide.

Topic: How Are Families Similar Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. Co-workers in the sales department of a company work closely together. These members of the sales department together make up a __________ group.
    1. familial
    2. primary
    3. tertiary
    4. secondary

Answer: D

Learning Objective: 1.2 Describe five ways that families are similar worldwide.

Topic: How Are Families Similar Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Jim and Lara, a couple, have lived together for a period of 10 years. Most of their friends and family members consider their relationship as socially acceptable. They also file a joint tax return. However, they do not have a marriage license nor have they been married by an authorized official. This is an example of a(n) __________.
    1. open marriage
    2. common-law marriage
    3. ceremonial marriage
    4. procedural marriage

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.2 Describe five ways that families are similar worldwide.

Topic: How Are Families Similar Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. While being legally married to Cassie, James married Lisa, too. James has engaged in __________.
    1. hypergamy
    2. homogamy
    3. bigamy
    4. endogamy

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.2 Describe five ways that families are similar worldwide.

Topic: How Are Families Similar Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. __________ refers to a cultural practice that requires marrying outside one’s group, such as not marrying one’s relatives.
    1. Bigamy
    2. Exogamy
    3. Endogamy
    4. Homogamy

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.2 Describe five ways that families are similar worldwide.

Topic: How Are Families Similar Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. Which of the following is a similarity between ceremonial marriage and common-law marriage?
    1. Both of them require partners to meet certain minimum age requirements.
    2. Both of these allow the partners to practice bigamy.
    3. Both of them require partners to follow procedures specified by the state or other jurisdiction.
    4. Both of them recognize couples as married if they have been living together for a certain period of time.

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.2 Describe five ways that families are similar worldwide.

Topic: How Are Families Similar Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. Sue and Fred could not have biological children, so they legally adopted a three-year-old boy named Mark. For Mark, Sue and Fred would be his __________.
    1. family of orientation
    2. family of origin
    3. fictive family
    4. family of procreation

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. The family a person forms by marrying and having or adopting children is referred to as the __________.
    1. nuclear family
    2. extended family
    3. family of procreation
    4. family of orientation

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Remember The Facts

  1. A network of people who are related by marriage, blood, or adoption is known as a(n) __________.
    1. neolocal system
    2. extended system
    3. kinship system
    4. nuclear system

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. A household made up of married parents and their biological or adopted children is called a(n) __________.
    1. nuclear family
    2. extended family
    3. joint family
    4. stepfamily

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. In a __________ residence pattern, newly married couples live with the husband’s family.
    1. neolocal
    2. patrilocal
    3. matrilocal
    4. co-local

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. Since the early 1990s, the tendency for young married adults to live with the parents of either the wife or husband, or sometimes with the grandparents of one of the partners has increased. Which of the following is an accurate reason for this?
    1. Children are now most likely to be staying in two-parent households as divorce rates have declined.
    2. At least half of all young couples can’t afford a medium-priced house.
    3. Most families are now self-sufficient as most couples are employed.
    4. Most young adults now do not like staying in multigenerational households.

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. In a __________ family system, the oldest females control cultural, political, and economic resources and, consequently, have power over males.
    1. patriarchal
    2. matriarchal
    3. nuclear
    4. neolocal

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. Jim has a strong-minded father who makes all the family decisions alone, without consulting the other family members. Jim’s family follows a __________ family system.
    1. neolocal
    2. patriarchal
    3. egalitarian
    4. matriarchal

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Which of the following is true of the egalitarian family system?
    1. Important family decisions are made by the eldest woman in the household.
    2. Women are marginalized and oppressed in such households.
    3. Both spouses share equal duties and responsibilities in such households.
    4. Important family decisions are made by the eldest man in the household.

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. Maria has been married four times over a period of 22 years. None of her marriages lasted more than a few years. However, she was never married to more than one person at a time. In this scenario, Maria has engaged in __________.
    1. endogamy
    2. polyandry
    3. polygyny
    4. serial monogamy

Answer: D

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. A woman who has two or more husbands practices __________.
    1. polyandry
    2. exogamy
    3. polygyny
    4. endogamy

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. In his community, Oscar is legally allowed to have two wives. What form of marriage exists in this community?
    1. polygyny
    2. polyandry
    3. monogamy
    4. serial monogamy

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Which of the following is true of polyandry?
    1. It is more common than polygyny in many societies.
    2. It exists in societies in which there is a shortage of men.
    3. It is a practice in which one man marries two or more women.
    4. It occurs when one man finds it difficult to provide for a family.

Answer: D

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. Which of the following is a myth about families in the past?
    1. Teenage pregnancy rates in the past were negligible compared with rates today.
    2. Until the 1970s, few people ever talked about child abuse, domestic violence, or divorce.
    3. Many families lived in silent misery and quiet desperation in the past.
    4. Parents spend more time with their children today than they did in the past.

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.4 Describe five myths about families and distinguish between functional and dysfunctional myths.

Topic: Some Myths about the Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. Which of the following is a common myth about what is natural in families in the Western world?
    1. that unmarried committed relationships are natural
    2. that motherhood is natural for women
    3. that remaining single or not marrying is natural
    4. that homosexuality is natural

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.4 Describe five myths about families and distinguish between functional and dysfunctional myths.

Topic: Some Myths about the Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. Which of the following statements is true regarding the self-sufficiency of the American family?
    1. Few families—past or present—have been entirely self-sufficient.
    2. Most families in the past were entirely self-sufficient.
    3. Middle-class families tend to prosper because they are the most self-sufficient.
    4. Only the poorest families tend to need help from the government.

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.4 Describe five myths about families and distinguish between functional and dysfunctional myths.

Topic: Some Myths about the Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. The myth that the family is a “haven in a heartless world” portrays an image where the family __________.
    1. is mostly self-sufficient
    2. has some health or economic problems to deal with
    3. does not have to worry about raising children
    4. always provides love, nurturance, and emotional support

Answer: D

Learning Objective: 1.4 Describe five myths about families and distinguish between functional and dysfunctional myths.

Topic: Some Myths about the Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. Maria's family is Catholic and insists that Maria marry a man who is also from a Catholic family. This practice of marrying within a certain group is referred to as __________.
    1. exogamy
    2. polygamy
    3. bigamy
    4. endogamy

Answer: D

Learning Objective: 1.2 Describe five ways that families are similar worldwide.

Topic: How Are Families Similar Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Monty believes that families today are in crisis because he hears news reports of divorce, out of wedlock birth, and family violence. Monty says that such events never occurred in the past, and the changes in gender roles are to blame. He is buying into which of the following myths?
    1. myths about the past
    2. myths about what is natural
    3. myths about the self-sufficient family
    4. myths of the family as a loving refuge

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.4 Describe five myths about families and distinguish between functional and dysfunctional myths.

Topic: Some Myths about the Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. Alexis is of the opinion that very few families, either in the past or in the present, can be called self-sufficient. Which of the following is an accurate statement that supports Alexis’s opinion?
    1. Families have prospered since the 1970s because of their savings and individual enterprises.
    2. A majority of people who have reached retirement are leading comfortable lives despite not being eligible for Medicare and Social Security.
    3. Many individuals in the middle class are likely to have collected unemployment payments after being laid off.
    4. The government provides no tax cuts for middle-income and affluent families.

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.4 Describe five myths about families and distinguish between functional and dysfunctional myths.

Topic: Some Myths about the Family

Difficulty Level: Difficult

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. Mei argues that families can also be a physically and psychologically taxing setting in society. Which of the following is an accurate statement that supports her claim?
    1. Young adults now tend to have a very realistic perspective about families and thus have fewer conflicts.
    2. Many parents experience stress while balancing the demands of work and family responsibilities.
    3. Most young adults now are more economically sound and also appreciate the benefits of multigenerational households.
    4. Most families are now becoming egalitarian, where both the parents equally participate in all the tasks.

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.4 Describe five myths about families and distinguish between functional and dysfunctional myths.

Topic: Some Myths about the Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. Which of the following is true of functional myths?
    1. Myths are functional when they disrupt a family.
    2. Functional myths can help us maintain emotional balance during crises.
    3. Functional myths tend to create misery in us.
    4. Functional myths divert our attention from social problems that lead to family crises.

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.4 Describe five myths about families and distinguish between functional and dysfunctional myths.

Topic: Some Myths about the Family

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. During a debate about the impact of myths on family, Charles states that myths are always dysfunctional. However, Dimitra disagrees and states that myths can be functional as well. Which of the following is an accurate statement that supports Dimitra’s position.
    1. Myths can make us pay more attention to widespread social problems that lead to family crises.
    2. Myths have induced generation of social policies such as child-support legislation.
    3. Myths deprive us of the hope that we can improve marriage and family life.
    4. Myths tend to provide unrealistic expectations regarding family life.

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.4 Describe five myths about families and distinguish between functional and dysfunctional myths.

Topic: Some Myths about the Family

Difficulty Level: Difficult

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. Which of the following statements supports the “family is declining” perspective?
    1. Men and women wait to get married until they are older and more mature.
    2. Adults who are financially deprived should not have children.
    3. Fewer adults are married now than in the past.
    4. Parents now have less control over their adult married children.

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.5 Compare the three perspectives on why families are changing.

Topic: Three Perspectives on the Changing Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. Which of the following is true of those who adhere to the "family is declining" school of thought?
    1. They state that as soon as an individual realizes that she or he is unhappy in a marriage, she or he should leave.
    2. They believe that financial success is the most important factor in keeping families together.
    3. They assume that marital partners should increase their sense of entitlement and decrease their sense of duty.
    4. They believe that people give up on marriage too quickly when there are problems.

Answer: D

Learning Objective: 1.5 Compare the three perspectives on why families are changing.

Topic: Three Perspectives on the Changing Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. Adrian agrees with the school of thought which suggests that the family is changing but is not declining. Which of the following opinions is Adrian most likely to hold?
    1. Marriage should exist for the sake of children and not just adults.
    2. Family problems and divorces are very recent concepts.
    3. There is nothing wrong in spending money on therapists, lawyers, and expert witnesses in cases of marital conflicts.
    4. Gender roles are very different now compared to the past, and the family has been resilient despite this.

Answer: D

Learning Objective: 1.5 Compare the three perspectives on why families are changing.

Topic: Three Perspectives on the Changing Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. Dr. Kayne explains that family problems have always existed. She notes family studies published in the 1930s, for example, included issues such as divorce, desertion, and family crises resulting from discord, delinquency, and depression. She also notes that gender roles and economic shifts have changed family roles. What perspective is Dr. Kayne most likely to subscribe to?
    1. Family is changing, not declining.
    2. Family is denigrating.
    3. Family is more resilient than ever.
    4. Family is declining.

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.5 Compare the three perspectives on why families are changing.

Topic: Three Perspectives on the Changing Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Ralph believes that families now are happier than ever before and are more resilient. Which of the following is an accurate statement that strengthens Ralph’s point of view?
    1. Recent data show that fewer adults are married and more are divorced or remaining single.
    2. In the past, many white, poor families enjoyed a life that was both gentle and genteel.
    3. In the past, many people stayed in unhappy marriages because of strong social norms and legal divorce obstacles.
    4. Studies show that there has been a decrease in multigenerational relationships in families.

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.5 Compare the three perspectives on why families are changing.

Topic: Three Perspectives on the Changing Family

Difficulty Level: Difficult

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. Which of the following is true of those who believe that the family is changing, but not declining?
    1. They argue that family problems such as desertion and nonmarital births have always existed.
    2. They believe that the mother who works outside the home is a new phenomenon.
    3. They argue that the emergence of single-parent families is a new trend.
    4. They believe that divorces did not take place until the late twentieth century.

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.5 Compare the three perspectives on why families are changing.

Topic: Three Perspectives on the Changing Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. Many parents look forward to an empty nest; however, many nests are becoming more crowded according to the text. Which of the following is a reason for this?
    1. Most young adults with young children live with their parents
    2. There has been a decline in the number of neolocal families due to unemployment.
    3. Young adults today are more likely to live with their parents than with a spouse.
    4. Women now tend to prolong child rearing by keeping huge age differences among children.

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.6 Explain how U.S. families have been changing in terms of demographic characteristics and racial-ethnic diversity.

Topic: How Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. Which of the following best describes the empty-nest syndrome?
    1. It refers to living alone after a divorce.
    2. It refers to households where couples cannot biologically have children.
    3. It refers to the departure of grown children from the home.
    4. It refers to the rise of one-parent families.

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.6 Explain how U.S. families have been changing in terms of demographic characteristics and racial-ethnic diversity.

Topic: How Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. According to the Census Bureau, a __________ household consists of two or more people living together who are related through marriage, birth, or adoption.
    1. fictive
    2. cohabiting
    3. nonfamily
    4. family

Answer: D

Learning Objective: 1.6 Explain how U.S. families have been changing in terms of demographic characteristics and racial-ethnic diversity.

Topic: How Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. During a lecture on external influences on families, Dr. Lily argues that demographic changes have had far-reaching consequences on American family life. Which of the following is an accurate statement that supports Dr. Lily’s argument?
    1. As people tend to live longer, they are more likely than in the past to outlive a partner, resulting in the increasing number of singles.
    2. Most U.S. families continue to stay in nuclear households despite a significant increase in the rate of unemployment.
    3. The U.S. birthrate has increased, and there has been a significant increase in neolocal, nuclear households.
    4. Children now are more likely to be living in two-parent households due to a decline in the number of births to unmarried women.

Answer: A

Learning Objective: 1.6 Explain how U.S. families have been changing in terms of demographic characteristics and racial-ethnic diversity.

Topic: How Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. Dr. Haydar, a sociologist, studies the social interaction patterns of several tribes in specific settings. He focuses on the choices that individuals in a tribe make. In this scenario, Dr. Haydar is studying the tribe at the __________ perspective.
    1. macro-level
    2. micro-level
    3. global-level
    4. nuclear-level

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.7 Explain how macro-level constraints affect families’ micro-level choices.

Topic: Why Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. A social scientist who studies the Industrial Revolution and its urbanization effects to understand a society’s economy is using a __________.
    1. nuclear-level perspective
    2. cognitive-level perspective
    3. micro-level perspective
    4. macro-level perspective

Answer: D

Learning Objective: 1.7 Explain how macro-level constraints affect families’ micro-level choices.

Topic: Why Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Which of the following is a difference between micro- and macro-level perspectives on the family?
    1. Unlike the micro-level perspective, the macro-level perspective focuses only on the decisions taken by the family members.
    2. Unlike the macro-level perspective, the micro-level perspective focuses on external factors over which families have little control.
    3. Unlike the micro-level perspective, the macro-level perspective takes into account constraints such as economic forces and technology.
    4. Unlike the micro-level perspective, the macro-level perspective states that the economy has no role to play when it comes to divorces.

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.7 Explain how macro-level constraints affect families’ micro-level choices.

Topic: Why Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Difficult

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. __________ perspective is a social science perspective that focuses on large-scale patterns and processes that characterize society as a whole.
    1. Nuclear-level
    2. Cognitive-level
    3. Macro-level
    4. Micro-level

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.7 Explain how macro-level constraints affect families’ micro-level choices.

Topic: Why Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Bryan and Rachel’s household consists of Bryan’s parents, Rachel’s mother, and two teenage children. Bryan is the only working member of the family, and he provides financial support for the entire family. In this scenario, Bryan and Rachel can be described as the __________ generation.
    1. caregiver
    2. pillar
    3. sandwich
    4. traditional

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.7 Explain how macro-level constraints affect families’ micro-level choices.

Topic: Why Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Jamie’s dressing and eating habits are heavily influenced by television programs, Internet fads, and pop music videos. Moreover, she acts and talks like her favorite actress as well. In this scenario, Jamie’s behavior is most likely influenced by __________.
    1. religious beliefs
    2. family values
    3. social movements
    4. popular culture

Answer: D

Learning Objective: 1.7 Explain how macro-level constraints affect families’ micro-level choices.

Topic: Why Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Emily believes in the marriage movement and thinks that the movement is important to help restore the declining family. Which of the following is most likely to be one of Emily’s opinions?
    1. Women should be more than just homemakers for a marriage to be successful.
    2. Cohabiting couples can have happier family lives than married couples.
    3. Federal and state benefits for children born to unmarried low-income mothers should be reduced.
    4. Premarital counseling classes and marital skills programs are a waste of time and money as they do not help increase marital success.

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.7 Explain how macro-level constraints affect families’ micro-level choices.

Topic: Why Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. Measures that governments take in order to support the formation, or improve the well-being, of families are known as __________.
    1. legal structures
    2. family policy
    3. family structures
    4. social rules

Answer: B

Learning Objective: 1.7 Explain how macro-level constraints affect families’ micro-level choices.

Topic: Why Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Easy

Skill Level: Remember the Facts

  1. Which of the following measures directly addresses family policy?
    1. creating a poverty line
    2. improving housing facilities
    3. passing a new adoption law
    4. controlling substance abuse

Answer: C

Learning Objective: 1.7 Explain how macro-level constraints affect families’ micro-level choices.

Topic: Why Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Which of the following is an example of a direct family policy measure?
    1. providing information on disabilities
    2. identifying a clear financial poverty line
    3. increasing the density of health care centers
    4. passing a domestic violence law

Answer: D

Learning Objective: 1.7 Explain how macro-level constraints affect families’ micro-level choices.

Topic: Why Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. During a debate about families, Carlos states that it is important to have a cross-cultural and global perspective. Which of the following is an accurate statement that supports his argument?
    1. Many critics have observed that information and understanding about different cultures tend to foster conflicts.
    2. Studies show that there has been a significant rise in the number of endogamous marriages in the last few decades.
    3. The Internet has significantly reduced the need for us to learn and know about other societies and cultures.
    4. The world today is an international place where the changes facing families are not only national but also global.

Answer: D

Learning Objective: 1.8 Explain why multicultural, cross-cultural, and global perspectives are important in understanding families.

Topic: A Multicultural, Cross-Cultural, and Global Perspective on the Family

Difficulty Level: Difficult

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. Dave and Maya, a married couple, could not have biological children, and so they adopted Will. They live independently, without their parents. Identify the family structure of Dave and Maya. What are some other forms of family structures?

The ideal answer should include:

1) Dave and Maya have a nuclear family structure.

2) A nuclear family is one that is made up of a wife, a husband, and their biological or adopted children.

3) Other family forms include the extended family, single parent families and gay and lesbian families.

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Discuss the major residence patterns and identify which pattern is the most common across the world.

The ideal answer should include:

1) In a patrilocal residence pattern, newly married couples live with the husband’s family.

2) In a matrilocal residence pattern, newly married couples live with the wife’s family.

3) In a neolocal residence pattern, the couple sets up its own residence.

4) Around the world, the most common pattern is patrilocal.

Learning Objective: 1.3 Describe five ways families differ worldwide.

Topic: How Do Families Differ Worldwide?

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Understand the Concepts

  1. What are examples of different kinds of contemporary myths about families that can be dysfunctional?

The ideal answer should include:

1) Family is always a loving refuge.

2) Families are self-sufficient.

3) Families were better in the past.

4) Only specific family forms are natural.

Learning Objective: 1.4 Describe five myths about families and distinguish between functional and dysfunctional myths.

Topic: Some Myths about the Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Apply What You Know

  1. Some scientists contend that divorce can be a good thing. Provide an accurate explanation that supports this view.

The ideal answer should include:

1) In the past, many people stayed in unhappy marriages.

2) Powerful social norms and legal obstacles made it hard to leave abusive marriages.

3) Today, adults can more easily get a divorce due to general unhappiness as well as more serious problems in the marriage.

4) Finding a new relationship and being happier can lead to positive outcomes for everyone.

Learning Objective: 1.5 Compare the three perspectives on why families are changing.

Topic: Three Perspectives on the Changing Family

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Skill Level: Analyze It

  1. Frank believes that there is no need for people in the United States to study and understand culture that is different from white, middle-class American society. How would you counter his argument, based on what you have learned?

The ideal answer should include:

1) U.S. culture is not the norm across the world.

2) Racial and ethnic diversity is actually the norm in the Unities States.

3) U.S. businesses have identified understanding of different cultures as important to the working world.

4) Cultural beliefs and practices from across the world shape current families in the U.S.

Learning Objective: 1.8: Explain why multicultural, cross-cultural, and global perspectives are important in understanding families.

Topic: How Are U.S. Families Changing?

Difficulty Level: Difficult

Skill Level: Analyze It

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